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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

G'day all!

 

I have just returned from a three day collecting trip to Beaumaris, a coastal suburb of Melbourne in Australia. This report acts as a pictorial overview of the trip and provides an insight into what collecting at this beach location is like. A similar trip was undertaken by@digit late last year (http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/70070-quick-trip-to-beaumaris-cliffs-australia/). I too had previously spent two days at this location in early 2016, during my first Victorian fossil hunting trip. Pictures of the finds from that trip can be found in this thread: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/61248-fossil-hunting-holiday-in-victoria-australia-dec-2015-jan-2016/

 

I decided to return to Beaumaris for a second time as i haven't been collecting for quite some time and i wanted to find more vertebrate material from this location, as i knew the potential that the site possesses and didn't manage to do it enough justice on my first trip here. All of these finds were collected on the shore across the three days that i spent here from the 14th through to the 16th of February. I spent most of that time rummaging on hands and knees in the beach shingle near the Beaumaris Motor Yacht Squadron. As mentioned my main goal was to collect vertebrate material and i was especially interested in finding shark teeth. The fossils come from the Beaumaris Sandstone formation and are between 5 and 6 million years old (latest Miocene or earliest Pliocene). Most of the vertebrate material is derived from a phosphatic nodule bed at the base of this formation, just above the unit contact with the underlying Gellibrand Marl. This nodule bed outcrops only at the very base of the cliffs and on the shore platform which is normally covered by the sea except at low tide. Because i was collecting loose material from the beach shingle a lot of the bones and teeth are heavily worn and fragmentary, but they are still very cool! Beaumaris is highly significant as it is one of the only places in Australia where you get fossils of both marine and terrestrial animals from this period of time, capturing a snapshot of almost the entire ecosystem from fish, birds and mammals to corals, gastropods, echinoids and many others. It is also one of the only places where you can collect vertebrate fossils so close to a major Australian city (only about 30 minutes drive from the centre of Melbourne). 

 

The Location: 

 

58a66f0843389_1-Location.thumb.JPG.df1790139c36948955703a40442329ba.JPG

 

58a66f15bc4a9_2-Location.thumb.JPG.85156a654ef86f9b147e510e1a1097a1.JPG

 

 

Fossil bones in-situ and in my hand (these are most likely from whales):

58a66f2896bab_3-WhaleBoneInSitu.thumb.JPG.eca1395e8133a6d073007c6aa7dde1bf.JPG

 

58a66f32ac4b5_4-WhaleBone.thumb.JPG.4d000484f4d9fa186157798bd9e68894.JPG

 

58a66f44343c7_5-WhaleBoneInSitu.thumb.JPG.ad30d9659f49dbb7055db5ce4671f59e.JPG

 

58a66f4d28c81_6-WhaleBone.thumb.JPG.c7f194f57df0bd474f209ae8de487b75.JPG

 

58a66f5f598ff_7-BoneInSitu.thumb.JPG.8eb841fd1666c8e76e9a83096c9214ea.JPG

 

58a66f676ca88_8-Bone.thumb.JPG.843cc3cd70adf5005fad9a29be6bd361.JPG

 

Many more pictures still to come!

 

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

Whale rib fragment in-situ on the beach:

58a671f5c36ec_9-WhaleRibInSitu.thumb.JPG.e51807e51abb265bee3d4c6399ff3baa.JPG

 

58a67200b81b4_10-WhaleRib.thumb.JPG.7cc379522768436c3f95957bb8623692.JPG

 

More in-situ bone fragments (likely cetacean):

58a67214e2908_11-BoneinSitu.thumb.JPG.880985c068fd7fe3f870c90355e690c7.JPG

 

58a6722332f6f_12-Bone.thumb.JPG.f60232e0208ee73720a74de6a7861aa4.JPG

 

58a67237129e7_13-SmallBoneinSitu.thumb.JPG.5d3317703dc8f69cc3f89c1525cd15b6.JPG

 

58a67243392c7_14-SmallBoneInSitu.thumb.JPG.ff502ab56cae7ffabe4acd94a156e0b9.JPG

 

58a67252420c7_15-SmallBoneInSitu.thumb.JPG.e6638c85e45da0c5bd88514bd5574a68.JPG

 

58a67260c0821_16-SmallBoneinSitu.thumb.JPG.2276d68369cae247a323d0a7499db3b7.JPG

 

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

Large fragment of whale bone in-situ on the shore:

58a672fe26f11_17-WhaleBoneinSitu.thumb.JPG.3e5a7fe73b4d13ce552eba19f876c5ae.JPG

 

Partial whale vertebral centrum (in-situ in the first photo, found at 1am!):

58a6730aa19ed_18-WhaleVertebrainSitu.thumb.JPG.d04a59935c1ca001c2937ab515456a64.JPG

 

58a67314c63cd_19-WhaleVertebra.thumb.JPG.8777bf9f19e93ce02c75bc5b6192c077.JPG

 

58a6731eba53f_20-WhaleVertebra.thumb.jpg.1eb9e6ab0bfe3713bf085d70190dc6c4.jpg

 

Another large whale bone fragment:

58a6732ab70ca_21-WhaleBoneFragment.thumb.JPG.5ba10d61a3267591719a799a65a9484d.JPG

 

Possibly a jaw fragment?:

58a673328420a_22-PossibleJawFragment.thumb.jpg.e9178a00c95823faca4cd96d629f7837.jpg

 

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

Extinct bullhead shark crushing teeth (Heterodontus cainozoicus):

58a673ef16297_23-InSituPortJacksonTooth.thumb.jpg.dd914b53518b49519ddbd543eff20adf.jpg

 

58a673ff471a4_24-InSituPortJacksonTooth.thumb.JPG.13fcec083882c056d463a125b51d1239.JPG

 

58a67408a6b04_25-PortJacksonTeeth.thumb.JPG.68c3b595b32ed296890ec5b7bb13a88e.JPG

 

Fish toothplate fragment:

58a67410a6be2_26-FishToothplate.thumb.JPG.549dc7bc1500c9626546efce020c1221.JPG

 

58a674174ac8b_27-FishToothplate.thumb.JPG.2fbb1ab85a868bdfae3bce980b2d7797.JPG

 

Diodon formosus (extinct toadfish) crushing teeth fragments:

58a674319c12b_30-Diodontoothfragments.thumb.JPG.e1b17b8c4dce5b4239678dbf5821b512.JPG

 

Fish vertebra:

58a67420aba3a_28-FishVertebra.thumb.JPG.6292eea2985731f1cec62f98a602899a.JPG

 

58a67427bf00e_29-FishVertebra.thumb.JPG.75899106779eabe6cba43e64ea82bec3.JPG

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

Shark tooth in-situ on the shore (Isurus oxyrinchus or Isurus desori?):

58a6751a06199_31-InSituSharkTooth.thumb.JPG.b0ce7164d3dc6ae5f232589fd62275bb.JPG

 

58a675219c148_32-SharkTooth.thumb.jpg.86a6ee05e9a951b337c44c429062b65c.jpg

 

58a6752986f9b_33-SharkTooth.thumb.JPG.4c6fc8138ae63806c16b7f478c1f7966.JPG

 

Galeocerdo aduncus tooth (extinct tiger shark) :

58a67533b5fbc_34-TigerSharkTooth.thumb.JPG.09f292205f90d9a622562c9759376ea3.JPG

 

A heavily worn Carcharodon hastalis tooth (extinct white shark and probable ancestor of the modern great white):

58a6753b530ff_35-HastalisTooth.thumb.JPG.31ec458106c740fefdd61ed7e8d6f288.JPG

 

58a675425ece0_36-HastalisTooth.thumb.JPG.3b9142993d3c888b8e8fa33f18a02331.JPG

 

All fish material collected on the trip:

58a6754c38630_37-AllFishMaterial.thumb.jpg.76dd4b181f802c6031dc1d78f94f1e0b.jpg

 

All other vertebrate material collected on the trip (most are cetacean bones):

58a67559affe6_38-AllMammalBoneMaterial.thumb.jpg.593387ef6b74c63fb326f3fb7ceb398f.jpg

 

Finally, the invertebrates!

 

Echinoids (Lovenia woodsi):

58a6756489fe4_39-Echinoids.thumb.JPG.343dc026978c88ddbffa1c6d2dca76a1.JPG

 

Gastropods, corals and a bivalve:

58a675704e98a_40-GastropodsCoralsandBivalve.thumb.JPG.a784704ce430318b4281b9cf337d4a8d.JPG

 

 

Thanks for checking out this report! 

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ynot    2,050
ynot

Nice finds from a beautiful location!

Thanks for sharing.

Tony

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Ash    77
Ash

Great post! Love the C. hastilis! That would have made the trip for me.

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Vieira    112
Vieira

Fantastic finds.

 

Thanks for sharing :dinothumb:

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Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

Great report and finds, Nathan!

Thanks for taking us along. 

In situ shots make me want to get out there. :)

Regards,

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digit    837
digit

Well done, Nathan! :1-SlapHands_zpsbb015b76:

 

When Tammy and I visited last October we had our search image set on Lovenia. I'm sure we likely overlooked some worn vertebrate (whale) bones but it is hard to be efficient at sussing out pretty little echinoids while also keeping an eye out for the telltale texture of a worn chunk of bone. As we were taking our finds away from Australia we didn't want to spend time hunting for any of the more rare finds from this locality (it would have complicated getting proper permission to export our finds).

 

I'm really glad you managed to make it back to Beaumaris and had the time (and the search image) to scour the beach shingle for the other items beyond Lovenia that can be found with a dedicated search. Your initial trip report on TFF was the basis for our collecting trip when we were in the Melbourne area. We wanted to indulge our passion for hunting while in Australia and the lovely Lovenia were a perfect quarry. Between Beaumaris echinoids and some opal that we found in Coober Pedy, we have lots of little reminders of our trip down under.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P.S.: In situ shots ROCK!

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Carl    510
Carl

WOW! I LOVE that kind of collecting. Why does Oz have to be so far away?

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Jesuslover340    143
Jesuslover340

Awesome finds! I like the bits of whale bone :D

Concerning the jaw piece...without more photos, I can't be sure, but the Vertebrate Paleontology of Australasia by Rich (pretty sure you have it) has a few figures of jaws from teleosteans from Beaumaris (page 383).

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Ludwigia    1,326
Ludwigia

Nice finds! Those echinoids are neat. Are they calcite inner molds?

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digit    837
digit

They are pretty little echis. I've seen some broken ones and it seems like these are the fossilized calcitic tests themselves as you can see the thin eggshell like layer in cross section which is filled with a sandy limestone matrix they they have been buried in. Here's a nice reference to the fossils found at this locality:

 

http://www.marinecare.org.au/images/Fossils_of_Beaumaris_Feb_2015.pdf

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

 

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101

Thank you everyone for the kind words!

 

@Jesuslover340- Yes i have that book (well, a borrowed copy). I was surprised to see that jaw number I on that page is a perfect match with the fish jaw i got at Beaumaris last year (below)! Still not sure about the find in this thread though, or whether it is even a jaw at all. I might make a separate ID thread for it later. 

 

58a7c5eb90125_jaw1.jpg.513c20060c322478f7edeabb02e55b5d.jpg

 

58a7c5f315739_jaw2.jpg.595414de598c24deac7cabc54f038883.jpg

 

 

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Jesuslover340    143
Jesuslover340

@Paleoworld-101 , sorry I couldn't help much on the one piece, but at least I inadvertently helped identify another! :P

Great book; should definitely get a copy if you don't have one!

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Paleoworld-101    95
Paleoworld-101
On 18/02/2017 at 4:10 PM, Jesuslover340 said:

@Paleoworld-101 , sorry I couldn't help much on the one piece, but at least I inadvertently helped identify another! :P

Great book; should definitely get a copy if you don't have one!

 

Too bad it wasn't more specific though, 'teleost'... so it's narrowed down to only 96 percent of fish diversity :P

 

I want an updated edition to be released! That would be amazing. 

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Jesuslover340    143
Jesuslover340

@Paleoworld-101 True...perhaps check the index and see if it mentions the fauna of Beaumaris a bit more in-depth elsewhere?

That would be amazing!

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