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oilshale

Several insects from the Jurassic of Inner Mongolia

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oilshale    492
oilshale

My grandfather was a medical doctor and a well known entomologist. He was specialized on geometrid moths and described several hundred new species. He even has his own short Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Bastelberger .
 

But I don't know the first thing about insects. That's a bit embarrassing - if he knew that, he would turn over in his grave. So I could need a helping hand.

I got several insects from the Middle to Late Jurassic of Daohugou / Inner Mongolia, but I have no clue what they are.

Any help to nail down the order or family is greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Thomas

 

58a6c4b01b723_Insect1-3.thumb.jpg.436d371d3c3634d4a5a3854429c5c478.jpg

Insect 1: 3cm

 

58a6c4c37fcce_Insect2-3.thumb.jpg.c153389637e16f36be4e0c5be7c2bf54.jpg

Insect 2:   2cm

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oilshale    492
oilshale

58a6c6067d0b9_insect3-3.thumb.jpg.c140bae17fe21518bb9b407b8a157b2c.jpg

Insect 3:     2.5cm

 

58a6c60cd9523_Insect4-3.thumb.jpg.c13b843ff7ea31bd4a09b0ab4aa0932e.jpg

Insect 4:  3cm

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oilshale    492
oilshale

58a6c6c81781f_insect5-3.thumb.jpg.c078482daf2722cf6079ffb3d4d34474.jpg

Insect 5:   1.5cm

 

58a6c6ddb0114_insect6-3.thumb.jpg.19cdc01d44863cd0736b87d9a2a14650.jpg

Insect 6:  3cm

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oilshale    492
oilshale

58a6c74b3b7e5_insect7-3.thumb.jpg.d6483a3033527e8a58341469af957b7d.jpg

 

Insect 7: 4cm

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RJB    369
RJB

Some very nice insects you've got there oilshale.  Im sorry I cant help you with any kind of ID info.  Good luck though.

 

RB

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Fossildude19    3,635
Fossildude19

I wonder what ever happened to @AgrilusHunter ?  

We could use his expertise here.

Great fossils as always, Thomas. 

Hope someone can help with ID's for you. 

 

Tim

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EMP    126
EMP

China's way out of my area of knowledge, but I think they might be a moth, fly, grasshopper type thing, another grasshopper (?), nymph, grasshopper again, and mayfly/mosquito. 

 

Ok I got something. The first one looks like Hadroblattula drepanoides. Five looks like Ephemeropsis trisetalis .  Last one could be Sibirobittacus atalus

 

The grasshoppers might be flies, maybe Protapiocera megista. 

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doushantuo    1,551
doushantuo

very nice,Thomas!!

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oilshale    492
oilshale
1 hour ago, EMP said:

China's way out of my area of knowledge, but I think they might be a moth, fly, grasshopper type thing, another grasshopper (?), nymph, grasshopper again, and mayfly/mosquito. 

 

Ok I got something. The first one looks like Hadroblattula drepanoides. Five looks like Ephemeropsis trisetalis .  Last one could be Sibirobittacus atalus

 

The grasshoppers might be flies, maybe Protapiocera megista. 

Grasshoppers, orthoptera? I don't know - I miss the elongated hindlegs for jumping. But how about cicada, leafhoppers?

So far I couldn't find Hadroblattula, but roach seems to be fine.

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EMP    126
EMP

I think it looks like a fly type bug now, but then again I have no real idea about China

 

Maybe the first one is a cicada, but it doesn't look quite right to me. 

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flyg    12
flyg

For what it's worth, the last one looks similar to a modern caddis fly of order Trichoptera. Given the size could also be Plecoptera. This would make sense with #5, which looks like possible Odonata nymph. Just food for thought, I know nothing about fossil insects.

 

G

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oilshale    492
oilshale
8 minutes ago, flyg said:

For what it's worth, the last one looks similar to a modern caddis fly of order Trichoptera. Just food for thought, I know nothing about fossil insects.

 

G

Yeah, thanks,  caddisfly can very well be.

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sdsnl    149
sdsnl

This advertorial might be a little useful (you have to scroll down a bit for the pics with ID):http://www.weixinyidu.com/n_1476082

 

It's pretty lacking but I haven't come across a better guide...

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Fruitbat    387
Fruitbat

You might want to check out some of the following:

 

Chang, H., et al. (2009). First Fossil Click Beetles from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Annales Zoologici (Warszawa), 59(1).

Cui, Y., et al. (2016). The first fossil salmonfly (Insecta: Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae), back to the Middle Jurassic. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 16(1).

Gu, J., Y-Y Zhao, and D. Ren (2004). New fossil Prophalangopsidae (Orthoptera, Hagloidea) from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. Zootaxa, 2004.
Huang, J., et al. (2007). A New Fossil Genus of Siphlonuridae (Insecta: Ephemeroptera) from the Douhugou, Inner Mongolia, China. Annales Zoologici (Warszawa), 57(2).

Khramov, A.V., et al. (2016). Early Green Lacewings (Insecta: Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) from the Jurassic of China and Kazakhstan. Papers in Palaeontology, Vol.2, Part 1.

Liu, Q., et al. (2015). Two new species of Kalligrammula Handlirsch, 1919 (Insecta, Neuroptera, Kalligrammatidae) from the Jurassic of China and Kazakhstan. Journal of Paleontology, 89(3).

Makarkin, V.V., Q. Yang and D. Ren (2014). A new basal osmylid neuropteran insect from the Middle Jurassic of China linking Osmylidae to the Permian-Triassic Archeosmylidae. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(1).
Nel, A., et al. (2001). A new family of Anisoptera from the Upper Jurassic of Karatau in Kazakhstan (Insecta: Odonata: Juragomphidae n.fam.). Stuttgarter Beitr.Naturk., Ser.B, Number 314.
Ren, D. and J.D. Oswald (2002). A new genus of kalligrammatid lacewings from the Middle Jurassic of China (Neuroptera: Kalligrammatidae). Stuttgarter Beitr.Naturk., Ser.B, Number 317.

Shi, C., Q. Yang and D. Ren (2011). Two New Fossil Lacewing Species from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China (Neuroptera: Grammolingiidae). Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol.85, Number 2.
Sukacheva, I.D. and A.P. Rasnitsyn (2004). Jurassic Insects (Insecta) from the Sai-Sagul Locality (Kyrgyzsan, Southern Fergana). Paleontological Journal, Vol.38, Number 2.

Wang, B., et al. (2008). Preliminary elemental analysis of fossil insects from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, and its taphonomic implications. Chinese Science Bulletin.

Yan, E.V., et al. (2014). The most mysterious beetles: Jurassic Jurodidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) from China. Gondwana Research, 25.
Zhao, J.-X., D. Ren and C. Shih (2010). Enigmatic earwig-like fossils from Inner Mongolia, China. Insect Science, 17.

 

-Joe

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abyssunder    2,632
abyssunder

The little egg-like individuals are conchostracans, with dispersal to Inner Mongolia, but you probably know this. Here's a document related to that, although is referring to the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Jehol Biota ecosystem which is considered (by some scientists) to have evolved from the Daohugou Biota.

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