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-Andy-

How do you clean Lebanese fossils?

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-Andy-

Hi all,

 

I just acquired several Lebanese fossils that are very chalky. The fossils themselves are even slightly covered in a fine white dust. They also feel as though they could easily be damaged.

 

Does anyone have any tips for cleaning of Lebanese fossils? Can I rinse them lightly with water?

 

Should I also use a sealant on them?

 

Thank you.

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Fossildude19

I would try a damp sponge on the back of a fossil, to see if it causes any damage. 

Then, clean the front, if the back survives with no damage.

I know Jim (old dead things) uses a fixitive for the Green River Fish he quarries - to keep the chalky dust from spreading everywhere.

Maybe search his posts. 

 

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FossilDudeCO

most people that dig Green River Formation use a mix of 1 part elmers to 10 parts water. 

Brush it on very lightly to keep the fish and rock looking good.

 

I have a few older ones from the 70's and 80's that have started to yellow though. It isn't very noticeable due to the colour of the rock anyways.

 

This may work on the Lebanese fossils as well, what I have seen from there is similar. But I do not know much about them.

 

As Tim said, see about Old Dead Things, maybe he uses something else

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jpc

Old Dead Things uses the same 50/50 elmers to water.  (he is taking a Forum hiatus).  Blake, if your old specimens are starting to yellow, this means the glue is actually changing chemically.  To what...I don't know, but possibly more brittle product.  This is why museums don't use elmer's.  I rarely seal Green River fish, but if I do I use thin vinac.   And I know nothing about Lebanese fish.   

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Harry Pristis

Here's the thing . . . you don't want to use an acetone-based consolidant over a white glue.  You'd get unsightly and difficult-to-remove white stains.  Best to contact the original preparer to find out what he may have used.

 

I had this challenge years ago with a Green River stingray that started to shed small particles.  I called the preparer (at a commercial quarry in Wyoming) and had to convince him that I wasn't trying to steal trade secrets (as I said, this was a long time ago).  I was able to use Butvar-76 to stabilize my fish.

 

Remember, you can use white glue over Butvar (Vinac, et al.), but not the other way around!

fossil_frames_trio.JPG

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RJB

Ive used 50/50 elmers and water many times, but only on what I consider B-Grade fossil fish.  I do use a lot of Glyptal.  Ive got fossils from over 20 years back that ive used Glyptal on and they still look the same as the day I did them.  Not sure if you can still get Glyptal though?   Im also old school.

 

RB

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-Andy-

Many of those material aren't available in my area.

 

I tend to use artist's matte varnish on my fossils. Guess I shall test it on a small part of my Lebanese fish.

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