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Small carbon film leaf scars


Rockaholic

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This is Pennsylvanian age Mazon Creek type material found in Indiana.

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Not sure if even a genus can be assigned to this piece let alone a species but I thought it was worth letting you guys have a look.This appears to be outer bark with small carbon film leaf scars overlying  exposed patches of inner bark.

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Any thoughts would be appreciated.

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That is absolutely fascinating, like a cross-section through the bark. I'll leave the ID for someone with more plant knowledge, though- I am still working to get myself up to speed on those.

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I agree it is likely a Lepidondedron sp, with different layering of bark on it.

 

This is really a neat piece. It has the inner bark exposed on the top left, along with the outer diamond scars in the center.

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5 hours ago, abyssunder said:

It looks to be something related to Lepidodendron. Link

 

5 hours ago, EMP said:

I agree it is likely a Lepidondedron sp, with different layering of bark on it.

 

This is really a neat piece. It has the inner bark exposed on the top left, along with the outer diamond scars in the center.

Thanks for your thoughts.With the absence of leaf cushions in this piece I'm reluctant to label it as Lepidondedron sp.Another possibility might be something related to Lepidophloios sp.Looking again at the leaf scars I'm wondering if my photo is orientated upside down.  

 

 

 

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I think leaf bases of an arboresent lycopod is right, but if I recall Lepidodendron scars are taller than wide. The alternative escapes me at the time.

Ah ! There it is Lepidophloios.

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Thanks everyone for helping me to think through this one and to sort through the terminology.Lepidophloios it is and yes my photo was upside down.

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On 2/23/2017 at 8:58 AM, Rockaholic said:

 

Another possibility might be something related to Lepidophloios sp.Looking again at the leaf scars I'm wondering if my photo is orientated upside down.  

 

 

 

Yes, that would be. Lepidophloios

 

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If I could put a too fine a point on this, then here we go. Yes, what you have is Lepidophloios and the picture is properly orientated now. There are about 20 Late Palaeozoic genera of compression fossil lycopsid stems. And Lepidophloios and Lepidodendron are the most commonly referred to names though many of the species have since been moved to more natural groups. Hence the 20 genera names. The post started out saying Mazon Creek type material from Indiana. This is a little misleading as the Mazon Creek material is from a near seashore deposit, and a very restricted time. The Pennsylvanian fossils from Indiana can be older or younger and mostly inshore deposits. Though this is not a problem as for flora names, but the paleoenvironment determines the plant populations. To my knowledge there are no examples of Lepidophloios at Mazon Creek. All labeled Lepidophloios specimens including the Langford pictures (provided by Abyssunder) are of different growth stages of a single species Sublepidophloios protruberans.   https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259712284_A_New_Look_at_the_Carboniferous_Lepidodendroid_Stem_Genus_Sublepidophloios_Sterzel

Langford in an unpublished manuscript was the first to put together all the growth stages in sequence and determined all the names applied to these stages belonged to a single taxon, Sublepidophloios protruberans. This taxon is strongly three dimensional and runs from wide and narrow when immature, to tall and relatively narrow side to side when mature. Unlike Lepidophloios, which is always wider than tall in all growth stages and dose not have a deep and strongly three dimensional aspect. 

 

Hope this helps,

Jack

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17 hours ago, fiddlehead said:

If I could put a too fine a point on this, then here we go. Yes, what you have is Lepidophloios and the picture is properly orientated now. There are about 20 Late Palaeozoic genera of compression fossil lycopsid stems. And Lepidophloios and Lepidodendron are the most commonly referred to names though many of the species have since been moved to more natural groups. Hence the 20 genera names. The post started out saying Mazon Creek type material from Indiana. This is a little misleading as the Mazon Creek material is from a near seashore deposit, and a very restricted time. The Pennsylvanian fossils from Indiana can be older or younger and mostly inshore deposits. Though this is not a problem as for flora names, but the paleoenvironment determines the plant populations. To my knowledge there are no examples of Lepidophloios at Mazon Creek. All labeled Lepidophloios specimens including the Langford pictures (provided by Abyssunder) are of different growth stages of a single species Sublepidophloios protruberans.   https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259712284_A_New_Look_at_the_Carboniferous_Lepidodendroid_Stem_Genus_Sublepidophloios_Sterzel

Langford in an unpublished manuscript was the first to put together all the growth stages in sequence and determined all the names applied to these stages belonged to a single taxon, Sublepidophloios protruberans. This taxon is strongly three dimensional and runs from wide and narrow when immature, to tall and relatively narrow side to side when mature. Unlike Lepidophloios, which is always wider than tall in all growth stages and dose not have a deep and strongly three dimensional aspect. 

 

Hope this helps,

Jack

 

Thanks Jack.I always enjoy learning from you.I can see where someone with your depth of knowledge might see more differences than similarities in the siderite concretions found in Indiana versus the Mazon Creek area.

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