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The QCC

Chambered Ammonite in thin section

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vasili1017

wow. awesome pics. thanks for sharing 

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Ludwigia

Nice photos. What can you tell us about the crystal formations? How thin is your section?

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The QCC

The crystals in this sample show good cleavage and relief. The thin section is approximately 50 microns thick.

This is pretty well the limit of my capabilities.
 

Under your category of "Kurioses und Humor" I would like to present a thin section of Periodotite  I call Big Bird.
Not a fossil, but humourous.
PeridotiteBigBird-1.jpg.6e5530aea3f3e64fa8c2905c06493838.jpg

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ynot
1 hour ago, The QCC said:

The crystals in this sample show good cleavage and relief.

The crystals are most likely calcite.

 

Nice pictures, thanks for sharing.

Tony

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The QCC

Calcite crystals.

Yes, that is what I had determined when I checked my reference guide "Rocks and Minerals in thin section" by MacKenzie and Adams, P63.

Calcite.thumb.jpg.65966058ada8b28506699bad2fc5e4bd.jpg

 

 

 

 

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jpc

great pix.  Yes,  I would agree with calcite.  It is very common inside ammonites.  

 

Can you explain what this means?:

"photo two is a stereo microscope composite of the Ammonite"

I often use my stereo microscope and Photoshop to make stereophotos of small fossils, but what is a stereo microscope composite?  

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The QCC

The first photo was taken with a macro lens on a Canon camera. The second photo was taken with the same camera mounted on the Zeiss stemi 305edu microscope.
Unfortunately or fortunately, the working distance and the field of view of the microscope are quite small. Therefore multiple photos of the Ammonite were stitched together using Microsoft's  Image Composite Editor (ICE).
I included both images to show the microscope composite image has more detail than the traditional macro photo.

 

It may not be a fair comparison as the microscope has multiple light sources and the macro lens was using ambient light.
Also, the camera/macro image is 10MP in one photo whereas the microscope composite image is 24MP in 30 photos.

Microscope image ChamberedAmmonite-1_3037_Full30.jpg.f46d2907734aec5402dd7f3fa0ee318a.jpg

Camera photoChamberedAmmonite-1_IMG_2043.jpg.773507e3d9dc78b752fd07f01e0d53cc.jpg

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jpc

ah, so it is a stacked photos.  

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The QCC

No, not stacked.

The slide stage is moved for each photo resulting in 30 different but overlapping photos. The software then arranges the photos to create a seamless image.

Microsoft ICE can stitch together many images regardless of the order they are taken.
My usual method is the photograph the along the longest edge in 4mm steps, shift the stage 3/4 of an image and photograph back along the long edge.

This partial scan of an Onchopristus Tooth shows the strip photo method I use. The full image has 15 photos.

OnchopristusTooth-2_3115_Full15.jpg.ba996843ec538b987d75aaa58af82b0a.jpg

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jpc

ah... photogrammetry.  

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Herb

nice photography

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