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Got this cute little Crane Fly from China. I believe it’s from Daohugou. When I popped em’ under the microscope at 10x I wasn’t expecting to see hairy legs! Very neat!00FDEBBB-D21B-4271-BEE9-8888A35E0AE6.thumb.jpeg.54d47c2d40e9719bb30c66ffd119f723.jpeg43AD2E9B-E232-49E1-9331-1A73CD502214.thumb.jpeg.e0f86fc0117e6ee58f47562111bb8a93.jpeg

 

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Hey guys! Not really a new arrival, but just now did I get the time to really look at them and take photos haha. So grateful for @Troodon and @Runner64in assisting me with finally getting these teeth. these two cuties are: 

 

Juvie anterior dentary trex teeth

powder river county, hell creek, montana

 

 

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Edited by carch_23
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1 hour ago, carch_23 said:

Hey guys! Not really a new arrival, but just now did I get the time to really look at them and take photos haha. So grateful for @Troodon and @Runner64in assisting me with finally getting these teeth. these two cuties are: 

 

Juvie anterior dentary trex teeth

powder river county, hell creek, montana

 

 

011C7AAE-CEED-4C08-B771-E7E43A5E724D.jpeg

896714AB-DD96-466A-96C0-0014A85BAC15.jpeg

55E562F2-B3CE-4FF8-ACD1-C4A8CC4B65CD.jpeg

49166F42-CF23-4285-9397-0C6E1F918F12.jpeg

68438FDB-AD95-46DB-B42B-2FAAEFFF0BAB.jpeg

8A3A4E32-FBF2-4D6F-A4AE-C10D2E8B87DC.jpeg

FEC7B0E1-80CD-4B21-AD02-DF4112EF6316.jpeg

2F89B9FA-4880-42E0-B045-6C979F469D9B.jpeg

Awesome teeth!

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Got a couple of fossils in the past week...

 

First to arrive was this Sauropod caudal from Ait Hani in Morocco (30cm long),

 

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Today this arrived at my house,

 

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It is a 44cm Polycotylid partial jaw from Morocco (near Goulmima) with some skull bones preserved. The jaw is quite small and thin so hard to tell which species but could be either Manemergus or Thililua. (sorry the pictures I took aren't the best!)

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon
3 hours ago, msantix said:

Got a couple of fossils in the past week...

 

Those are some awesome fossils, Michael! That vertebra looks absolutely massive! :default_clap2:

 

Quote

It is a 44cm Polycotylid partial jaw from Morocco (near Goulmima) with some skull bones preserved. The jaw is quite small and thin so hard to tell which species but could be either Manemergus or Thililua. (sorry the pictures I took aren't the best!)

 

Now that I'm seeing a photograph with your hand for scale, I'm pretty much convinced that this is Manemergus anguirostris. Not only does it compare favorably against my own mandible section, it also does so against the Manemergus-holotype from Karlsruhe (albeit that specimen appears to be a juvenile).

 

Comparison-dolphin-mandible-vs.-polycotylid-mandible-01.jpg.0b3dbf20affa849aad461d27dc78114c.jpg

 

 

 

1482742550_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris01.thumb.jpg.433396095f5d269471c7cbb77e6bd5a5.jpg465489352_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris02.thumb.jpg.1658c81bb82658034724ebce57585d76.jpg954650054_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris03.thumb.jpg.3e5714d4db9de28d01b0993574132e41.jpg

Edited by pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon
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4 hours ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

Those are some awesome fossils, Michael! That vertebra looks absolutely massive! :default_clap2:

Thank you! It is nice to finally acquire a big fossil like that, but the shipping costs were expensive!! :) 

 

4 hours ago, pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon said:

Now that I'm seeing a photograph with your hand for scale, I'm pretty much convinced that this is Manemergus anguirostris. Not only does it compare favorably against my own mandible section, it also does so against the Manemergus-holotype from Karlsruhe (albeit that specimen appears to be a juvenile).

 

Comparison-dolphin-mandible-vs.-polycotylid-mandible-01.jpg.0b3dbf20affa849aad461d27dc78114c.jpg

 

 

 

1482742550_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris01.thumb.jpg.433396095f5d269471c7cbb77e6bd5a5.jpg465489352_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris02.thumb.jpg.1658c81bb82658034724ebce57585d76.jpg954650054_JuvenileManemergusanguirostris03.thumb.jpg.3e5714d4db9de28d01b0993574132e41.jpg

 

Yeah I am just happy that it is a Polycotylid partial skull, I don't know how big Manemergus got compared to Thililua (which I think reached 5-6 metres in length) and I wonder if my fossil belongs to a Juvenile as well (like the holotype). Your Manemergus jaw is beautiful! love the work done on it, always worthy to be displayed :) 

 

P.S this is the only article I could find that compared Thililua to Manemergus 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5882735/

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pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon
12 minutes ago, msantix said:

Yeah I am just happy that it is a Polycotylid partial skull, I don't know how big Manemergus got compared to Thililua (which I think reached 5-6 metres in length) and I wonder if my fossil belongs to a Juvenile as well (like the holotype).

 

It's an excellent specimen, and I hope I'll at one point have opportunity to add a fossil like this to my own collection. It's just such a cool specimen! :fistbump:

 

As to which of the two polycotylid plesiosaurs the jaw could be from is indeed somewhat problematic, since no adult Manemergus anguirostris individuals are known, while no juveniles are known from Thililua longicollis. Since your specimen conforms very well to the holotype of M. anguirostris in size, and that's a juvenile, I suspect that your individual was also a juvenile. Further complicating matters is that Fischer, Benson, Druckenmiller, Ketchum and Bardet (2018) mention that (p. 24)

 

Quote

Manemergus may be congeneric with Thililua, but the very young age of the type and only known specimen of M. anguirostris makes it difficult to reach a taxonomic decision.

 

At the same time, however, they observe (p. 5) that

 

Quote

it is unlikely, however, that Manemergus anguirostris is a species-level synonym of Thililua longicollis because these taxa have different counts of cervical vertebrae (30 in Thililua longicollis compared with 25 in Manemergus anguirostris).

 

Thus, it seems that other than by having availability of a full set of cervical vertebrae, it's not possible to differentiate between the two yet. Except, potentially, using a tooth row count/tooth formulae - a not uncommon, if fluctuant, method also used to classify pliosaurs. As Morgan (2016, pp. 64-65) explains, in Thililua longicollis

 

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the mandibular symphysis bears 15 pairs of teeth

 

whereas Manemargus anguirostris has

 

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15 dentary [teeth] including 9 symphysial teeth.

 

Much, of course, then depends on where the division between symphysis and dentary is drawn in these narrow-snouted polycotylids. But I doubt this method would work in your case anyway, since the symphysis isn't reached. In fact, with the available tooth count visible from the photographs, one would be want to classify the specimen as Thililua longicollis (I count six teeth, which would be before the symphysis and therefore more than the 15 - 9 = 6 to the symphysis if you consider your specimen would need at least one tooth position more to reach where the symphysis may have started). Then again, with the M. anguirostris holotype being a juvenile, and it being documented throughout the animal kingdom that dental formulae may differ between adults and juveniles, we might be using incompatible formulae anyway...

 

Anyway, as you said, "polycotylidae indet." might be safest for the time being... :)

 

12 minutes ago, msantix said:

Anyway thank you so much for your help! I know I have been pestering you with questions about whether that fossil is a Pliosaur tooth or if this is Polycotylid jaw and so on...…

 

No worries! Always glad to help! ;)

 

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