captain badlands

Couple Of Spots In The Alberta Badlands

11 posts in this topic

a couple simple maps I threw together for persons interested in spending some time in the badlands. Our government has some strict laws on the collection of fossils, so anything you find you will have to A) pass it on to a local; B) catch and release; C) smuggle it out. I would imagine that option c happens, I've run into a couple rippers whom i ran off, and I've seen a few places where rippers have been. Usually they make a mess and take way more material than what your average collector would

some safety related stuff:

- summer in the badlands is harsh, it could be compared to canyons in the souther USA. be smart and bring a wide brimmed boonie hat, and some sunscreen. My last trip to Drum resulted in 2nd degree burns on my arms, which I hadnt thought possible.

- climbing around. Be very careful while trolling the hills in the badlands, there is an ever changing combination of slides, small washout caves and sinkholes. DO NOT GO COLLECTING WHILE ITS RAINING. I tried this and almost fell into a sinkhole that measured 30 feet deep. Because of how erosion occurs, you could very well be standing over a sinkhole covered by a few inches of dried mud. In short, be extrwemely careful where you put your feet. A walking stick helps. Do not go into caves or sinkholes alone, always have a rope and a spotter. Drumheller has a hospital, but a hospital is useless if you're trapped or stuck under a boulder. Many of the sites are inaccessable to EMS, so please be careful. Slides also occur when it's dry too, so be aware of what's going on above you. The last bit of advice is be careful where you put your hands- we dont have lethally venemous scorpions or snakes (we have a species of rattlesnake, but drumheller is out of it's range) but we have cacti here that will cut you up something fierce.

this map is a general overview showing the other mini maps

Main.jpg

Map one is of the Horsethief Canyon lookout showing the easiest routes down to the canyon floor. I prefer the extreme north end of the canyon as it's a bit of a hike and there's fewer people around. Be careful descending, there is broken glass and bits of metal trash that people have thrown from the lookout :(

map1.jpg

map two is of Horseshoe Canyon, a popular spot for tourists. Most people erroneously waste time scouring the canyon floor, but the real action is at the north end again. The canyon is connected to the Three Hills River valley through a fairly short ravine. If you stand at the lookout point, look left and you will see 2 distinct stands of trees. Aim for a spot between them and start walking. Right near the mouth of the ravine there are a couple bone beds, but anything I've posted poics of can be found in this spot. Bivalves, gastropods, plants, dino bones - its the full meal deal...

map2.jpg

map three is of the area near Wayne, a tiny village in one of the finger valleys. They have a hotel (with cold beer!) camping facilities right on the creek, the works. Wayne is likely one of my favourite all time places to go, it's so peaceful and quiet. The landowners in the area are usually cool with surface collectors, I usually use simple bribery with the 6-pack as my gold standard. Works like a charm! Because it's out of the way, you will likely not encounter other collectors. There is also an abandoned mining site with some neat stuff to take pictures of...

map3.jpg

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Camping at Wayne sounds like my cup of joe B)

Gimme some of that solitude!

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Thanks for sharing.

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Thanks Captain that is a very good report. Do not think I will ever get there but am going to print and save it in my files

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Thanks Captain that is a very good report. Do not think I will ever get there but am going to print and save it in my files

I'm a bit of a map geek, stay tuned for more in the future....there will be a series of maps related to this area.

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Nice maps, Captain. On a general note, is it a good idea to focus on the layers around the coal seams? There are so many layers, it gets very confusing. Have you found anything in the Red Deer River Valley before Drumheller?

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Nice topic thx.

I have yet to do anything of value in the area...this info should help and come in handy.

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a bit late but great maps. i prefer to take the canoue down the rdr and get deep in.

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Just found the thread... is the Horseshoe Canyon where the Corbicula and Panope bivalves can be found? I've got some specimens that were collected by someone else but the accompanying info is vague.

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Great maps captain badlands! I think I know the shell-filled rocks you have in map 1. Is that the Drumheller Marine Tongue?

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what do you find at the third locality?

how common are the dinosaurs at the horseshoe canyon location

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