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Roz

Fish Tooth?

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Roz

At first I thought this was an enchodus fish tooth but am not positive.

There are fine serrated lines all the way down it, although my camera didn't

pick that up. It was found in a Pawpaw formation and is Cretaceous. Is

Cretaceous spelled with a cap as shown? I have never been sure.

Am showing 2 views.

post-13-1201478559_thumb.jpg

post-13-1201478573_thumb.jpg

Thanks for looking..

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hybodus

Hi Roz! Yes Cretaceous is spelled with a cap.

Your tooth is from Enchodus, probably Enchodus ferox . Enchodus was a large predatory fish, similar to todays Pike. Enchodus went extinct at the end of the Cretaceous, and is one of the more common large "bony fish" found in many Late Cretaceous marine deposits. It's a cool fish with the nick name of "Sabre Toothed Cretaceous Fish" due to its large upper and lower palatine fangs.

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Roz

Thank you both for the detailed information and also the link. On the link it shows the

longest enchodus teeth I have ever seen. Sure like to find one curling out of the jaw

like that!

I have found quite a few while living in Arkansas but think this is only my second from Texas.

It looked a bit different from my others, so wanted to be sure. Now I can add it in my display case.

Wish it was named the 'saber toothed Cretaceous fish' instead of enchodus, saber toothed brings a visual image

to the brain right away. The second name such as ferox, is probably named after the finder? Sorry, someone recently was helping me in that area, so now I know that is the species. Sure hope I got that right, will have

to recheck that whole thing.

I think with a lot of echinoids and other fossils it is. I suppose enchodus is from a Latin name maybe.

Could be it is descriptive in Latin. I will try to find out.

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Harry Pristis
Thank you both for the detailed information and also the link. On the link it shows the

longest enchodus teeth I have ever seen. Sure like to find one curling out of the jaw

like that!

I have found quite a few while living in Arkansas but think this is only my second from Texas.

It looked a bit different from my others, so wanted to be sure. Now I can add it in my display case.

Wish it was named the 'saber toothed Cretaceous fish' instead of enchodus, saber toothed brings a visual image

to the brain right away. The second name such as ferox, is probably named after the finder?

I think with a lot of echinoids and other fossils it is. I suppose enchodus is from a Latin name maybe.

Could be it is descriptive in Latin. I will try to find out.

Enchodus ferox translates to "fierce spear-tooth." Enchodus is Greek for "spear-tooth"; ferox is Latin for "fierce."

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Uncle Siphuncle

Roz

What Harry is describing is referred to as etymology, in paleo the study of breaking down and translating taxonomy. Generic names can actually mean something in Latin such as Triceratops (3 horns) or take the name of somebody such as Craginaster. Specific names most often take the name of a person or place. If Lance finds a new Pawpaw Xanthosia crab and donates it, he could ask to have it named after himself, i.e. X. halli, simply by adding i to the end to indicate that it is named after a singular male. If you find a new species of Enchodus tooth and donate it, and ask to have it named after you, it would be E. morganae as ae denotes that it is named after a singular female. You could name it after your whole family by calling it E. morganoram or just the women in your family by naming it E. morganarum. If instead you want to name it after Denton Co. you could call it E. dentonensis as ensis denotes a geologic feature (creek, river) or place (county, state, city, etc.). Keep up the good work.

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LanceH

Roz's enchodus fangs have a fairly sharp edge lengthwise along the tooth. If the tooth is smooth around the circumference is that a pterosaur tooth or is their another fish tooth that is smooth around the circumference?

Dan... I'm trying to find that new Xanthosia :P

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Northern Sharks
Roz

What Harry is describing is referred to as etymology, in paleo the study of breaking down and translating taxonomy. Generic names can actually mean something in Latin such as Triceratops (3 horns) or take the name of somebody such as Craginaster. Specific names most often take the name of a person or place. If Lance finds a new Pawpaw Xanthosia crab and donates it, he could ask to have it named after himself, i.e. X. halli, simply by adding i to the end to indicate that it is named after a singular male. If you find a new species of Enchodus tooth and donate it, and ask to have it named after you, it would be E. morganae as ae denotes that it is named after a singular female. You could name it after your whole family by calling it E. morganoram or just the women in your family by naming it E. morganarum. If instead you want to name it after Denton Co. you could call it E. dentonensis as ensis denotes a geologic feature (creek, river) or place (county, state, city, etc.). Keep up the good work.

Great info Dan. Do those rules apply worldwide? I'm only asking because I have a Xiphodolamia ensis tooth on it's way. I guess the guy who found/named it forgot where he got it :D

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Uncle Siphuncle

These are part of the ICZN rules. I think I first learned about them in the preface of Hulbert's book.

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Uncle Siphuncle

Sometimes specific names don't reference a person or place at all, but rather some attribute of the species. For instance the ammonite Mortoniceras equidistans has 3 tubercles on the side of each rib, with the middle tubercle equidistant from the outer 2.

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Roz

If my cat can stop playing with the plug, so I can see, I might actually finish this post!

Yes, interesting how all that comes about. The thing that will be

named after me will have that ending because I remember he

was going to change it since I am female. pretty cool stuff..

The only thing that I have heard different is the writer of the paper

has the option to name the fossil but usually names it after the finder.

I could be wrong on that..

Harry, it's ALL Greek to me! :lol:

Takes awhile for things to sink in...

Thanks!

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