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ozrit

Campanian shell fossil from Israel. ID neede please :)

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ozrit

Hello,

This was collected in Israel from a Campanian site. It is a flint rock.

Any help would be highly appreciated. It is as indicated 25 mm in height.

Thank you very much in advance,

Oz

F1 s.jpg

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Ash

Cant help but its beautiful!

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abyssunder

I suggest a muricid gastropod like Ecphora as starting point in the ID.

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ozrit

Thank you very much!

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Fossildude19

@MikeR or @Coco might be able to help with this. 

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MikeR

For sure it is not Ecphora but I don't have the expertise to assign an ID from that part of the world.

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Coco

Hi,

 

Thanks @Fossildude19 to call me, but I can't help to ID this nice gastropod. I don't know its family to begin an ID... And I know a little only about the Cenozoïc shells...

 

Coco

 

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FossilDAWG

There is a described Cretaceous species of Ecphora, E. proquadricostata Wade 1917, from the Ripley Formation at Coon Creek, Tennessee.  [note: Sohl 1960 accepted this species as an Ecphora, but I recall reading somewhere else that it was later excluded from the genus, and no Cretaceous subgenera or species are listed on the Wikipedia treatment of the genus).

 

That being said, ozrit's specimen seems to have significant differences from Ecphora although there is a superficial resemblance.  For example, the specimen does not have an extended siphonal canal, which would exclude it from the Muricidae, the family to which Ecphora belongs.  Although the bottom of ozrit's specimen seems to have some damage, the aperture is entire which excludes the possibility that a canal was once present but is now broken off.

 

Unfortunately I don't have a good suggestion for what the genus may actually be.

 

"Ecphora proquadricostata" is shown in this figure from Sohl 1960 (the specimens on the ends, not the ones in the middle).  Note the siphonal canal.

 

Don

Ecphora proquadricostata.jpg

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abyssunder

Good document, doushantuo!

Unfortunately, none of the illustrated specimens of that document looks like the SQ.

" Flat-topped protoconchs also occurs in other Cretaceous gastropods of doubtful taxonomic position, like Sargana, Weeksia, Morea and "Ecphora" proquadricostata (BANDEL 1993c)." - from the linked document above

 

If I compare Wade's E. proquadricostata with the type species Fusus quadricostatus Say, 1824 described and illustrated in * (Fig.110), I see some little differences in shape. The latter has more resemblence with the specimen in question (SQ) than the former. Considering that the SQ passed through diagenetical  (chert, flint, sylex) and geological processes, and there is a considerable part of the shell missing (broken off possibly due to the extraction process from the matrix), visible in the lower part of the OP's image, I wouldn't rule out the possibility of an Upper Creataceous Ecphora species, even if it could be from a sister taxa. The similarities are too relevant, in my opinion.

 

selection.thumb.jpg.958c0600f5fefb53c7e24811f27b5026.jpg

*Ebenezer Emmons. 1858. Report of the North Carolina geological survey. Agriculture of the eastern counties; together with descriptions of the fossils of the marl beds.

 

" SYSTEMATIC DESCRIPTIONS
Order NEOGASTROPODA
Superfamily MURICACEA
Family MURICIDAE
Subfamily RAPANINAE
Genus ECPHORA Conrad, 1843
Type by monotypy, Fusus quadricostatus Say, 1824.
Diagnosis. Small to moderately large subfusiform shells with a moderately low spire. Whorls strongly shouldered, with strong spiral carinations over periphery; basal constriction strong. Whorls may be loosely attached. Aperture ovate, produced to a narrow, generally elongate and curving siphonal canal terminating in a moderately strong notch; outer lip crenulate; inner lip moderately thick, free or partly attached over parietal surface. Umbilicus broad, open, deep, and margined by a serrate strong carina.
Discussion. With the exception of the Cretaceous species, E. proquadricostata Wade, all the known species of Ecphora are from the Oligocene and Miocene.
With such a restricted range the propriety of placing Wade's species from the Ripley Formation in the genus Ecphora has been questioned. The possibility of the Ripley species being a homeomorph cannot be discarded but, in all shell features except size, it is a close analogue to the type species E. quadricostatus (Say) from the Miocene. Ecphora proquadricostata does possess nuclear whorls, ornament, apertural features, umbilical characters, and growth lines so similar to those of the type species that it would be unwise to separate this species from the genus Ecphora purely on the basis of time lapse. In general the Tertiary species are all of medium or moderately large size. In the mature stages of these forms the whorls begin to deviate and frequently may lose contact completely with previous whorls. Most Ecphora species possess a translucent brown outer shell layer and a light-colored lamellar inner layer. The Cretaceous species, E. proquadricostata, is small and does not appear to possess such a translucent brownish outer shell layer. Such a shell layer, however, may be rather unstable and could have been replaced so that now there is no such differentiation. (...) " - N. F. Sohl. 1964. Neogastropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Basommatophora from the Ripley, Owl Creek, and Prairie Bluff Formations. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 331(B):153-344

 

Other views of the SQ could be possible, eventually from the lower (missing) part of the specimen posted?

 

Ecphora proquadricostata Wade 1917

Ecphora quadricostatus Conrad 1830

Ecphora gardnerae Wilson 1987

 

 

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ozrit

Hi MOTM,

Thank you very much for your comments. Attached additional photos of the specimen from different angles (first one - from bellow).

I hope it will shed more light.

I have a small specimen (juv.), I will make photos of it and upload it here as well.

With best regards,

Oz

l1w.jpg

l2w.jpg

l3w.jpg

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ozrit

and here is the juv.

Height - 10mm

ls1w.jpg

ls2w.jpg

ls3w.jpg

ls4w.jpg

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abyssunder

Thank you for the new photos. They strengthen my idea regarding to Ecphora.

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ozrit

Thank you. As far as my search goes, I think my specimens are predating the time of Ecphora. Am I wrong? My specimens are

with no doubt from the Campanian. Is this genus is known from that period?

Regards,

Oz 

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