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ozrit

Baculites? Campanian, Mishash foration, Israel

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ozrit

Hi,

Is it possible to say more than Baculites on this specimen?

It is 12mm in diameter.

Campanian, Mishash foration, Israel (Central Negev area).

Many thanks,

Oz

L1s.jpg

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FossilDAWG

Your photo is seriously out of focus, so it is impossible to answer your question.

When you retake the photo, can you also use indirect lighting (lighting from the side) oriented to highlight any surface features such as nodes or ribs.  These are hard to see if there are no shadows to bring them out, and they are important for an ID.  Also we would need to see the sides, and an end-on view to give a concept of the cross section.  

 

You should be aware that there are many (100 or more) described species of Baculites, as well as related genera such as Eubaculites, and so it takes an expert who has specialized in these fossils to give a confident ID.  It is possible that someone on the Forum may be able to give you a possible ID, but if a really solid ID in necessary (for example, if you are doing research on the formation that yielded these fossils) you will have to seek professional input.

 

Don

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BobWill

Even out of focus I believe you have the right genus. To narrow the list of possible species you might look for a list of the fauna commonly found at the site or the formation where it was found. If there's more than one then look for distinguishing features in the literature. Hopefully someone on the forum will already know anyway to save you the trouble.

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abyssunder

I can't give you a precise ID and I agree with the others.
Was it found at the top of the uppermost flint layers of Mishash Formation ( which confirms the Late Campanian)? It looks like flint in consistence, translucency and color (It reminds me of your other specimen in question, posted previously, the gastropod), with some green moss attached to it.
Pretty nice, btw! Better pictures would reveal more its beauty. :)

 

P.S. : I don't know if it helps, but maybe Picard, Leo, 1929, On Upper Cretaceous (chiefly Maastrichtian) Ammonoidea from Palestine: Annals and Mag. Nat. History, ser. 10, v. 3, p. 433-456 (unreachable?). - could be a starting point in the research.

 

" B. palestinensis Picard (Picard, 1929, p. 438, pl. 10, figs. 1-7; text figs. 1, 2) closely resembles B. reduncus in its curvature and ornamentation, but the Palestine species has a broader venter and a much simpler suture. " - as stated here, page 459.

 

 

Edited by abyssunder

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ozrit

Thanks. A better photo will be impossible since the texture is not on the surface but rather under it. This was the best psooble photo (taken with 12 different depth of field layers).

It was found less than a feet from the Ammonite I posted (which was shot the same way with layers and with one flash from behind it to show the transparency better). I will look for Picard's work.

Thanks again.

Oz 

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ozrit

BTW, Atteched a photo of Xerocrassa davidiana picardi - in honour of Leo Picard.

Sadly. this species was very local and endemic and now consedered as extinct.

Not a fossil, I know. Still thought it would be nice to show.
Xyrocrassa-davidiana-picardi.jpg

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fossiling
54 minutes ago, ozrit said:

BTW, Atteched a photo of Xerocrassa davidiana picardi - in honour of Leo Picard.

Sadly. this species was very local and endemic and now consedered as extinct.

Not a fossil, I know. Still thought it would be nice to show.
Xyrocrassa-davidiana-picardi.jpg

Interesting. Where does this thing live?

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ozrit

It survived only on one hill top in the middle of the City Ramat-Gan (borders Tel-Aviv from the East). A company which was supposed to make some work there didn't care about

the fauna too much and just destroyed the whole area for easy transportation of its equipment. Sadly no livind snails were seen since (about 3 years ago).

It was endemic to a certain rock formation called kurkar. The nominal subspecies is still common but doesn't have this pagoda shape shell.

Regards,

Oz

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ozrit

Hi,

Another Baculites from the same site and period. This time the details are clear. Any idea of what species it might be? Its diameter at the widest edge is 7mm.

Many thanks,

Oz

 

Baculites1b Ps.jpg

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