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Lukel1988

Fossilized shell help?

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Lukel1988

Hello, can someone help me ID this? Me and my work friends have had a heated debate over this. I think this is a petrified shell and they say I am wrong and that it is obviously just a shell. Please can someone confirm whether this is a fossil?

 

IMG_1912.JPG

IMG_1908.JPG

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

Where was this found?

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ynot

Welcome to TFF!

It looks like a fossil oyster, but a location would help to confirm this.

 

Tony

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Herb

It is an oyster

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WATERLINE

It is an oyster...Scientific name is Gryphaea arcuata...Lower Jurassic bivalve. I found similar up near Speeton on the Yorkshire coast about twenty years ago.

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GeschWhat

Welcome to the forum! I think the common (fun) name is "Devil's toenail."

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elcoincoin

+1 on gryphea and yes its a fossil

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Lukel1988

Thanks for your help guys, I'm currently working on a gas site and found this in the gravel, I guess off the sea bed. There are many of these, along with what appears to be petrified wood.

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ynot
Just now, Lukel1988 said:

Thanks for your help guys, I'm currently working on a gas site and found this in the gravel, I guess off the sea bed. There are many of these, along with what appears to be petrified wood.

Where are You working?

There are gas sites all over the world.

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doushantuo

gryp

Tony Hallam noted some correlations between abundance and facies,BTW

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Yvie

Welcome to TFF. Great find

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abyssunder

One could say Peterborough is a little far from the Yorkshire coast, but *this document confirms the existence of Gryphaea in the Peterborough region. So, I agree with WATERLINE, that the specimen in question is a Gryphaea  fossil oyster. Nice one, BTW! :)

 

" Graphic sections.
Figure 3 is a log of the section based on examination of the beds in situ; key beds are indicated on the photograph (Fig. 2). Figure 4 includes a log of the condensed lower beds. The equivalents of these beds have yielded most of the large vertebrate fossils recorded from the Peterborough district (Martill 1985, 1986) and are characterized by shell beds with abundant Gryphaea dilobotes Duff; we refer to them informally as the ‘Gryphaea and Reptile Beds’. " (...) - as stated in * Hudson-Martill, 1994

 

Also, here is a mentioned...

" They are all obviously Gryphaea species but seem to vary between the shape of G. arcuata and G. dilobotes. They may, of course, just be variations within a single species. "

 

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Lukel1988

This is what we found in about 20mins. Are the two long ones petrified wood?

IMG_1922.JPG

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Fossildude19
4 hours ago, Lukel1988 said:

This is what we found in about 20mins. Are the two long ones petrified wood?

 

They look more like Belemnites to me.  

Neat finds. 

Regards,

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ynot

I agree with belemnites.

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abyssunder

Yes, they could be that.

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