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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Summerville, South Carolina - Mako sp ?

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Hi There,

 

  I'm curious about this small tooth that popped up in my sifter from a creek bed in Summerville, SC. I've looked at references for Mako shark species (elasmo) to try and figure it out (retroflexus ?).  It isn't the usual shape I'm used to, the root is not as robust as I'm accustomed to and the tooth in proportion to the root feels too squat.  Does it just have an odd pathology or abnomality ?  Or is just not an Isurus sp. at all.

 

01_Summerville_SC_Mako_031717.thumb.jpg.b3378cdea8cae9bad06dca9932383dc2.jpg

 

Thanks,

Brett

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Troodon

They look like Alopias sp. maybe A. grandis  Thresher shark.    Nice teeth

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
17 minutes ago, Troodon said:

They look like Alopias sp. Thresher shark.    Nice teeth

Thanks Troodon !

  

  I should'a looked at Alopias as a possibility.  My selection bias at work .. haha. I've never seen one so broad.  I see this very occurence .. or one that looks very similar has been discussed on the forum.

 

My experience being as yet limited.  I've only ever run across his baby cousins in the area.

02_Summerville_SC_AlopiasSp_031717.thumb.jpg.3a7c119408a46dc66f707f060f08165c.jpg

 

Thanks again.

 

Cheers,

B

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Darktooth

Great find Brett!

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Al Dente

Here's a link to a similar one from South Carolina- http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/36455-thresher-help-with-id-please/

 

Hieronymus does a good job of explaining it in the link. Either Alopias latidens or Alopias sp., similar to the one he posted I his April 8, 2013 post.

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
12 hours ago, Al Dente said:

Here's a link to a similar one from South Carolina- http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/36455-thresher-help-with-id-please/

 

Hieronymus does a good job of explaining it in the link. Either Alopias latidens or Alopias sp., similar to the one he posted I his April 8, 2013 post.

 

Thanks Al,

 

  Yes, I ran across his description of the species and it was very informative.  The Chandler Bridge formation is an interesting place to explore in this area, I've also run across different discussions on the forum discounting the information that I previously had of the existence of the Hawthorne fm. in this area ..... and instead I may be finding Meg fragments and partials from a reworked Pleistocene Wando formation that rides right on top of the Chandler.  It is probably where my little unidentified premolar came from as well.

 

Again .. as always the brain trust here has been an invaluable resource and I appreciate the help.

 

Cheers,

B

 

13 hours ago, Darktooth said:

Great find Brett!

 

Thanks ! ... it's great when you can pull up something unusual and new. 

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