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Doc Kutner

FOSSIL ID

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Doc Kutner

I have a few fossils that I've unearthed over the years and although I majored at Oklahoma University in Geology, I've forgotten the ID's of these pieces. I know I should have them at the tip of my tongue, but for the life of me I can't identify these few pieces. I've included a wrist watch for scale (should have used a mm gauge I know). Any help will be greatly appreciated.

UNKNOWN01.jpg

UNKNOWN02.jpg

UNKNOWN03.jpg

UNKNOWN04.jpg

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum :) 

 

I've moved your topic to the Fossil ID forum. ;) 

The last item is a Knightia eocaena from the Green River Formation. 

In the first picture, the one on the right looks like either an Exogyra  sp.  or a Gryphea sp  oyster.

Some of the midwest folks might be able to help out with the others. 

Regards,

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Coco

Hi,

 

First one near the watch is quartz.

 

Coco

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coled18

The two leftmost in the first picture appear to be some kind of gastropod (ancient snail), I'd say Platyostoma for the first one on the left, although I am not sure. If you told us where these were found, that would be great. I live in Kansas, where larger gastropods are not too common

I agree with fossildude19 and coco, the fish looks like a Knightia Eocaena and the large crystal is quartz.
Again, if you could tell us where these were found and give better pictures of the second from the last, I bet I could help you more.
Cole

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BobWill

Welcome Doc. Except for the fish it looks like you've been collecting in the Cretaceous of south central or southeastern OK or maybe across the river where I'm from. I live in Cooke County with some of the same fossils. The second picture looks like a piece of the heteromorph ammonite Idiohamites fremonti.

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DPS Ammonite

First picture, bottom row, left to right: 2 Gyrodes and Exogyra. Both types occur in the North Sulphur River area of NE Texas.

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