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sTamprockcoin

I spent the afternoon fossiling. I've always called these turnitella. Is this correct/are they even identifiable?  They're from the Surilian - Wills Creek Formation. I did no prep except a quick rinse. I'm looking forward to working on these. I've also posted in the Pennsylvania section 3 different "forms" of Favosites that I found in the same formation. 

Spirals 1.jpg

Spirals 2 bottom.jpg

Spirals 2 top.jpg

Spirals 3 bottom.jpg

Spirals 3 top.jpg

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That is a really nice slab of gastropods. I would have called them turritella too but others will have more to say on that...

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sTamprockcoin

That's actually 3 different samples and there's more out there I only spent about 20 minutes there.

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Nice ones.
Unfortunately, they can't be Turritella gastropods with temporal range from Cretaceous to recent. Wills Creek Formation of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia is Silurian in age and contains fossils from the Pridoli to the Ludlow epoch.
Maybe, Turnitella ? :)

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I think Hormotoma would be a good candidate.

Also, I'm wondering if they couldn't be from the Mckenzie formation, rather than from Wills Creek Formation.

Edited by abyssunder
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sTamprockcoin

The location is definitely Wills Creek formation as per the interactive PA geologic survey map and the Blair County Geology report.

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Really nice collection of gastropod internal molds there, Tim. Without surface features of the shells such as ribbing or ornamentation it will be difficult to come up with a precise ID, but Hormotoma looks like a decent guess. Glad to see you're getting out and sharing your finds with us.

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I'll also go with Hormotoma, but only because I don't know many other paleozoic gastropods that look like those. It does occur in the Silurian at any rate.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎3‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 8:44 PM, abyssunder said:

I think Hormotoma would be a good candidate.

Also, I'm wondering if they couldn't be from the Mckenzie formation, rather than from Wills Creek Formation.

 

I agree Holotoma sp. is probably it.

 

I think this is probably Wills Creek material we're looking at. Gastropods like these are quite common in some of the limestone layers, where as the McKenzie tends to be mostly just ostracodes, brachiopods and hash material (by the way, be on the lookout for ostracoderm plates when you're in the transitional zones in the Wills Creek).

 

I have a bunch of McKenzie Formation stuff from near one of Jasper Burn's old sites that I could post, lots of hash limestone with crinoids and brachiopods. Unfortunately I only found a couple of trilobite molt fragments, and no eurypterids (the two things I wanted to find the most!).

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sTamprockcoin

This locality is a highway road cut almost in the middle of a 3 mile long ridge. Jeff P collected localities along the ride last fall. I have seen a nice variety of fauna  from ostracodes to trilobites! There are numerous cuts  created by shopping plazas along the ridge so its easy collecting from a fairly soft formation.

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