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TheWanderers

Jemez site

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TheWanderers

Hello,

just joined the forum and thought we'd start with info on one of our favorite places so far. My wife and I are fairly new to rock / fossil hounding but enjoy it very much.

 

im willing to share this site with you all, just send me a message.

in the mean time, to the experts who might be able to point us in the direction of info for identifying what we have found would be greatly appreciated . 

 

Doug

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ynot

Welcome to TFF!

Nice finds!

I see some crinoid stems (lower right)

Brachiopods (lower left)

Ammonite piece (center) ?

Can not tell about the other pieces.

Tony

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ynot

PS second picture is brachiopods.

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TheWanderers

Thank you!

The piece still in the rock is a half shell but It's not in the same shape of a ammonite. Those are on our list of must finds this summer; just can't determine where to go exactally around Rio Puerco.

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FossilDudeCO

@PFOOLEY may be able to narrow it down further for you!

 

Nice finds!

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FossilDAWG

There is a New Mexico Geological Society guidebook to the Jemez Springs area.  Here is a link.  Unfortunately the plates are very poor copies, but perhaps you can find a copy at at local library (I'd suggest the University of New Mexico library) and make good photocopies or scans.

 

In the top photo, the brachiopod at the top is a productid, possibly Anaquitonia.  The four relatively large triangular(ish) brachiopods are Neospirifer.  On the right side are three smooth small brachiopods, these seem to be Composita.  Below them are some crinoid stems.There is no ammonite, that specimen is a worn Neospirifer.

 

The Jemez Springs area has long been known for its excellent Pennsylvanian fossils, yet it still continues to produce fine specimens.

 

Don

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PFOOLEY

 

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TheWanderers

I went through that post but the location we go to is not noted, requires no tools and the best part is that you can walk 10 feet from your car and be in the the action right away.

 

 

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PFOOLEY
11 hours ago, TheWanderers said:

I went through that post but the location we go to is not noted...

 

Thought you might use it for identification of your specimens...you may have a different spot in the same formation. Have fun.

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TheWanderers

For sure. I appreciate it. Was using that info and Dons identifications which both helped quite a bit!

 

you all are a great group!

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Mike Dooley

Has anyone found red coral in the Jemez or New Mexico in general?

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PFOOLEY

@Mike Dooley, I could be wrong but I think true Red Coral is a modern, deep sea Coral that was introduced to Native Americans of the SW hundreds of years ago though I guess it is totally possible to find a fossil Coral that is replaced with a red mineral. Good luck in your search...if you find some, it would be interesting.

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ynot

There is some red agate horn coral found in the mountains east of Salt Lake cityt that is the only fossilized "red" coral I know of.

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