Jump to content
Kane

Visit to "Riprap Hill"

Recommended Posts

Kane

The older I get, the more spring has an appreciable effect on my energy and outlook. But, it also signals an end to cabin fever and getting back into the hunt. Spread out over two non-consecutive days, I took to getting back into practice by doing some collecting nearby. There are no "wow" specimens here, but certainly typical ones I find from a wide mix of stratigraphic units all in one place. The first is one of the areas I focus on, which are mostly little gullies where some larger rocks are exposed, and smaller ones get sifted.

IMG_3070.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Fairly typical view of the ground. On the left of brach hash, and on the right a bit of the same with some bryozoans.

IMG_3056.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

brach hash.

IMG_3055.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peat Burns

:popcorn::popcorn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

What is left of a 2-ton rock after the winter. This one was a real heartbreaker as it was littered with trilobites (mostly moults), some of them fairly substantial, but they'd only appear after you tried to split it, and so in pieces like this. You can see a crinoid stem in the centre.

IMG_3058.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Another brach hash. This smaller ones sometimes appear like a coquina, and come out all pink against the grey-brown matrix.

IMG_3059.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

A sampler of specimens: a piece of a much larger tabulate coral, a distinctly red brach, a worn Aulopora sp., another brach and a cute mixed hash.

IMG_3072.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Gastros! A high-spired chap, and a mould.

IMG_3073.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Two busy plates. The first with a Leptaena surrounded by small brachs, and the second with brachs and several trilo-moults. The second type of rock is where I find Basidechenella, and I've been actively searching for more samples. But, as it is a very mixed bag, it's a bit like finding a tentaculite in a haystack.

IMG_3075.JPG

IMG_3077.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

The last is a dysphilid coral chunk with some impacted brachs. 

 

Overall, nothing really exciting, but it was good spring training. The area is really tough on the legs with some fairly steep hills and some undulating (and lovely) woods to go through. Some of the underbrush have early leaves budding, a few purple springtime flowers poking out of last year's fallen leaves, a few mayapple shoots, an orchestra of birds, a few dandelions, and many of our insect and arachnid friends groggily getting back into the spring-swing of things. Thanks for looking!

IMG_3074.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Nice, thanks for sharing!

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Glad to see you've gotten out there, Kane. 

That red Leptaena is pretty. :wub: 

Thanks for the report. 

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG

I recall that you have found some fine trilobites there.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
belemniten

Nice finds and a great trip !

Sorry for my ignorance but do you know what this is ?

IMG_3074.thumb.JPG.4be7d8ebf3a754ab846ed36a20b995be.jpg.1df18018ce6d4d23a4f832cc180cb64f.jpg

It looks interesting ...

Also a brachiopod ?

Thanks :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDudeCO

Thanks for letting us tag along on your trip!

I have yet to get out this year so this is nice to see!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Thanks all! - I hope to post more once the semester is over. Fortunately, it is almost literally in my backyard. The bad news is that my time there may be finite due to a surge in development.

 

@FossilDAWG - I hope to improve on the finds by locating some very specific rock types, but I always wonder if after four or so years of visits, I haven't come close to picking it over! 

 

@belemniten - I do think it is likely a brach, and the coral probably grew and enclosed around it (or perhaps the brach was able to "bore" in somehow?). There is some interesting folding on the other side, suggestive of growth patterns that compensated for some environmentally-related obstruction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yvie
3 hours ago, Kane said:

The older I get, the more spring has an appreciable effect on my energy and outlook. But, it also signals an end to cabin fever and getting back into the hunt. Spread out over two non-consecutive days, I took to getting back into practice by doing some collecting nearby. There are no "wow" specimens here, but certainly typical ones I find from a wide mix of stratigraphic units all in one place. The first is one of the areas I focus on, which are mostly little gullies where some larger rocks are exposed, and smaller ones get sifted.

IMG_3070.JPG

Hi perhaps you have S.A.D.,seasonal affected disorder,a special lamp is available that stimulates your pineal gland less melatonin (sleep) more serotonin (happy,active,energy).They work extremely well for certain people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Archie

Great finds I love your Leptaena! Looks like a lovely place to hunt :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Hi @Yvie - I can't say I have SAD. I grew up in much harsher winters and am spoiled here in the southern part of Ontario, and do bump up my vitamin D intake over the darker months. I break out in a sweat 15 C, so I'm fine with cooler temps! My appreciation of spring comes with age and how many springs I might have left :). To me, every spring becomes ever more a kind of miracle. I enjoy it more as opposed to my younger self that might have taken it for granted. And, if we take the astrologic route, I am an Aries, and this is certainly my time! I feel so alive at this point and in late autumn. Can't explain it, but love it - like I'm 20 again :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yvie
10 hours ago, Kane said:

Hi @Yvie - I can't say I have SAD. I grew up in much harsher winters and am spoiled here in the southern part of Ontario, and do bump up my vitamin D intake over the darker months. I break out in a sweat 15 C, so I'm fine with cooler temps! My appreciation of spring comes with age and how many springs I might have left :). To me, every spring becomes ever more a kind of miracle. I enjoy it more as opposed to my younger self that might have taken it for granted. And, if we take the astrologic route, I am an Aries, and this is certainly my time! I feel so alive at this point and in late autumn. Can't explain it, but love it - like I'm 20 again :)

Happy birthday or belated one.My OH celebrated Wednesday,great fun got to make the most of every day.Spring is one of my favourite seasons too,everything coming alive again.Great research is being done on Vit D,it may prevent certain cancers.Fossiling has cured my lower back pain too,all that walking,lifting and bending.We have an elderly aunt in Ontario keep meaning to go and see her,like you said, never know how many.Happy Hunting.

  Yvie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al Dente

Hello Kane

 

Is this the same site that you found the Devonian coral that you posted a short while back? If you remember I made the claim that the coral had to be younger than Devonian and looked like modern or fairly recent Scleractinian  coral. I think the coral in this post is also much younger than Devonian. In your picture you can see one valve of an oyster attached to the coral. I did some quick research and the earliest oysters I was able to find are from the Middle Triassic. Also there appears to be a pholad clam bored into this coral. The earliest pholad clams that I could find were from the Jurassic. I'm wondering if glaciers have brought in some Cretaceous material to this site or somehow people have dumped younger material here (ship ballast?). It would be interesting if you could remove the clam for a positive ID but don't do it just on my account, I don't want you to ruin a nice coral fossil if you don't want to.

riprap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plax

was going to mention the same thing Al. the oyster looks like an exogyra lower valve??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Hm. In re: that coral. Now I'm wondering if someone salted the area with something they picked up. Entirely possible as a lot of that rock is just trucked in and dumped. I should probably put the scope on the potential pholad and oyster. As the probability of finding something naturally deposited from the Mesozoic is near zero, I will assume someone must have found it elsewhere and discarded it. I must have a fossil fairy! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

Kane, I really like those hash plates. What is the specimen in this pic? Is it a bryozoan or a sponge or?

 

IMG_3072.JPG.7a88160743268fb98fb0d8b8800431ad.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

I'm thinking it is likely a bryozoan, but I don't want to stick my neck out too far as it might be a sponge for all I know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×