Jesuslover340

Exciting Aussie Fossil!

44 posts in this topic

:drool:

 

I have no words, other than excellent find! Congratulations!

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That is incredible! A happy dance for you both :):megdance::megdance::megdance:

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Glad you like it. Your reaction opening the box was priceless :D

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:wub::dinothumb:

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Thanks everyone-quite excited to have it! And what it might entail...

Another interesting feature of this tooth is how the sides seem to curve in on the posterior side to form a 'crisper', more defined edge. The serrations also gradually disappear on that edge towards the bottom (and not from wear).

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Amazing tooth!

Congrats!

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Thanks :D

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Hey Skye, I'll put up pics of a pallimnarchus pollens tooth or 2 from the same area to show differences when I get home from work.

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A really nice tooth ! And rare !

Congrats :wub: Wish i would have such teeth in my collection :D
 

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Alright, found same area, same day. Here is a little P. pollens tooth. Showing the more circular cross section. Skye, need a pic from the bottom of yours :)

 

33698442245_ed808fe95c_z.jpg

 

 

33657322766_ed81813ff3_z.jpg

 

32855625584_9816902734_z.jpg

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Very nice teeth congratulations folks

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Picture of Ash's P. pollens jaw. Notice the very robust, round alveoli. Then the base of the aforementioned tooth :)

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Close up pics showing the serrations :)

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20170415_101332-1.jpg

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Awesome find! 

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These photos might serve to clarify the confusing matter at hand concerning the organization of Aussie crocs. In the first two, the tooth to the left is P. pollens; the one to the right is Quinkana sp. (note how similar the base is to the tooth above). The three subsequent images are presumed to be ziphodonts. However, as seen in the last image, your ziphodonts have more laterally compressed, rounded alveoli. Yet the base of the Quinkana tooth (which is a ziphodont) and the alveoli of the jaws are fusiform in shape. To add to the confusion, P. gracilis (which, as you'll recall, may not be a valid taxon) also has fusiform alveoli.

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downloadfile-20-1.jpg

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Wow good pics of the serrations, Skye!

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Thanks :) I'm very curious to see how the organization pans out, seeing as it's being reassessed (partly).

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Curious...why the teeth of a species would only sometimes be serrated...and why the smaller species of a genus would presumably fill the same niche as the ziphodonts based on tooth morphology.

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Might anyone have any ideas as to the above? Would love to hear anyone's thoughts.

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Hey Skye, do you think this is P. Pollens or possibly Gracilis? Any chance you could add it to that picture of all the jaws above and put it beside them to see how it compares? (or send pics to Mr Molnar?)

 

IMG_0791.JPG

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Yay to more awesome crocs! You two make a power couple :)

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9 hours ago, -Andy- said:

Yay to more awesome crocs! You two make a power couple :)

You have some awesome croc material as well! I love your Elosuchus tooth and Deinosuchus teeth!

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She's right, you do have some great croc yaself!

 

But thanks :)

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Thanks! You know what amazes me?

 

No matter how old the croc we have, whether it's some Cretaceous giant monster like Sarcosuchus or a modern croc from Java, or some incredibly rare one like your Aussie crocs - they fit the same general profile, cross section and ridges.

 

"Gee, I don't know, Cyril. Maybe deep down I'm afraid of any apex predator that lived through the K-T extinction. Physically unchanged for a hundred million years, because it's the perfect killing machine. A half ton of cold-blooded fury, the bite force of 20,000 Newtons, and stomach acid so strong it can dissolve bones and hoofs."

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