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handyman richard

Is this poop ?

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handyman richard

I saw this and it struck me as dino poop.

I was in st thomas us virgin islands.

The spheres were about 1.5 to 2 inches in diameter.

IMG_0077.JPG

IMG_0075.JPG

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JohnBrewer

Hi Richard, welcome to the forum.

 

I totally see where you're coming from! I'm sure it's geological but I'm far from an expert in coprolite (poop/poo). However I do know someone who is @GeschWhat will confirm or otherwise. 

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Troodon

Welcome to the forum

Is it possible they are just growths in the tree.  Hard to see how something that large would be carried up the tree.  Galls,Tumors and Burls, 

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Peat Burns
5 minutes ago, Troodon said:

Welcome to the forum

Is it possible they are just growths in the tree.  Hard to see how something that large would be carried up the tree.  Galls,Tumors and Burls, 

At first glance, I thought it was a tree also, but I think it's actually a rock exposure (?) that has globular inclusions.

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westcoast
8 minutes ago, Troodon said:

Welcome to the forum

Is it possible they are just growths in the tree.  Hard to see how something that large would be carried up the tree.  Galls,Tumors and Burls, 

I think that's rock,  not a tree. 

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abyssunder

Just geological, in my opinion. :)

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handyman richard

Here is a third pic I took.

I wish i took a pic of the rock this was embedded in. It looked very similar to the cover pic of this forum. It had many parallel fissure cracks with some at random angles 15 degrees or so that crossed the parallel lines. The odd thing was that where they crossed there was no sign of offset cracks. meaning each piece came to a sharp point and the points touched each other. It could have been a mud flat long ago and the cracks were a result of drying out and then getting wet again. once again it looked very similar to the picture this forum uses as wall paper.

You can see two of the cracks I am talking about just to the left of the two globules.

IMG_0076.JPG

Edited by handyman richard

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Darktooth

I think they are nodules of some sort.

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supertramp

Hi richard,

any chance that’s a volcanic rock (maybe basalt) outcrop? The “globular shape” reminds me of a weathering pattern frequently occuring in such rocks

https://www.google.it/search?q=onion+skin+weathering&rlz=1C1PRFI_enIT740IT740&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwja5YS79KrTAhUC_ywKHS-BDT4Q_AUIBigB&biw=1366&bih=638#imgrc=_

 

ciao

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handyman richard

I can't say with certainty that it is volcanic. My feeling then was that it was not volcanic. This rock appears to be composed of layers although their  color seamed consistent.

An area that had a relatively new exposed surface was smooth compared to the photos where the rock was etched from ocean water.

Once again I was intrigued by all the apparent cracks that were kind of parallel and the intersecting cracks all of which showed no sign of slippage also the rock was pretty solid as one unit and not coming apart.

I believe the rocks behind it were metamorphic I could see their stratification on uplifted angles.

The sample rock probably fell down from somewhere up the mountain. St Thomas is rather mountainy.

Well I am just a stumbling amature and the answer can only be found by someone that knows what they are doing.

If you should go to St Thomas for a vacation the coprolite(??) is located at Magens Bay on the  Beach all the way to the south end or just turn left down the beach. It's really hard to miss.

I have certainly learned some good stuff.

btw Magens Bay Beach makes some outrageous bushwacker drinks.

Thanks,

 

 

Edited by handyman richard

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fifbrindacier
On ‎17‎/‎04‎/‎2017 at 0:38 AM, JohnBrewer said:

Hi Richard, welcome to the forum.

 

I totally see where you're coming from! I'm sure it's geological but I'm far from an expert in coprolite (poop/poo). However I do know someone who is @GeschWhat will confirm or otherwise. 

Hi, John, that's been a long time since i saw you posting.;)

 

Those nodules make me think about earth poops.

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ynot

From the US geologic survey....

"The rocks of St. John, which is located near the eastern
end of the Greater Antilles and near the northeastern corner
of the Caribbean plate, consist of Cretaceous basalt,
andesite, keratophyre, their volcaniclastic and hypabyssal
intrusive equivalents, and minor calcareous rocks and chert. "

 

I think they are volcanic in origins. 

Not sedimentary or fossil of any kind.

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