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aplomado

Anyone hunted at Harrell Station?

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aplomado

Hello,

 

I am arranging a visit to Harrell Station's fossil site (dinosaur quarry).  Anyone been?  Tips?

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FossilDAWG

I collected there once, on a Birmingham Paleontological Society field trip arranged in conjunction with the University of Alabama, who owns and strictly controls access.  "Dinosaur quarry" is a misnomer for sure.  You will be collecting in very large chalk gullies; the chalk reflects the sunlight and acts like a solar oven.  Expect temperatures to be significantly hotter than the surrounding landscape.  Bring your weight in water.  Fossil bone is extremely widely scattered, and almost nothing is articulated.  Apart from worm tubes (Hamulus) and the occasional tiny fish vertebra, bits of turtle were most "common" find; I found about one scrap of fish or turtle bone (or less) per hour.  I did make one exciting find, a string of about a dozen shark vertebrae.  As soon as I notified one of the U of A paleontologists (actually one of the grad students) I was (rather rudely, I thought) told to stand back and was summarily dismissed to "go look somewhere else".  I also found a nice fairly large Cretalamna tooth, but that was also taken.  As I recall, at the end of a very hot and exhausting day (for which I drove 5 hours in each direction) I returned home with nothing.  I hope your luck and circumstances are better.

 

Don

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aplomado

I found a mosasaur tooth, and some sabertooth herring teeth.

 

My daugher found some shark teeth.

 

My oldest son found a mosasaur vertebrae.

 

My youngest found some teeth and a sanddollar.

 

The palentologist was super nice, let us keep everything, and even pointed out some finds to my kids so they could collect them.

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FossilDAWG
On 6/21/2017 at 1:56 PM, aplomado said:

My youngest found some teeth and a sanddollar.

 

The palentologist was super nice, let us keep everything, and even pointed out some finds to my kids so they could collect them.

It seems the attitude of the paleontologist made all the difference.  I'm glad you had a successful trip and your kids made some good finds.

 

I'd appreciate it if you could post a photo of the sanddollar.  Echinoids in general are extremely rare in the Mooreville; actually they are present but rarely survive the weathering out process.  All I have found in the Mooreville are isolated plates.  Also "sanddollars" (highly flattened disc-shaped echinoids) did not evolve until the Eocene, so far as is reported in the literature, so I'm curious to see what you found.

 

Don

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aplomado

Hello,

 

It was a partial sanddollar.  I will try and take a picture.

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