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MichellePonds

Fossil ID Australia various

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MichellePonds

Hi all, would love some help please :) 

1st  - One of the rocks on the edge of my pond has these 3 raised mounds, 1 has something across it too I've highlighted.

2nd - small ocean fossil approx 1cm round zoomed in

3rd - worm like fossil approx 3cm long

All from the Lower Hunter Valley area, Australia, Many thanks Chelleimage.thumb.jpeg.f9cdcd258bf83b5aba13cecd8d45bc66.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.5114907b2af615036ff91e6c3c824c60.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.9e954b434a40ee0bb565840ad1227413.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.44e452b2f311fa99cc2b9b2afad2d927.jpeg

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Kane

The second image looks crinoidal to me. 

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abyssunder

Kane is right! There are crinoid and bryozoan fragments.

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MichellePonds

Thanks Kane & Abyssunder, every Crinoid I looked up was either bigger or alot more complex, would like to find out date of it, any idea on the other 2? Cheers :) 

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ynot

The other 2 pieces look geologic, not fossil. (maybe fossils that are very worn.)

Agree that pic 2 is crinoid stem segment, but it is also very worn.

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GeschWhat

The first one is very interesting...some kind of steinkern perhaps?

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abyssunder

I agree. The ones from the first picture might be brachiopod or bivalve related (hard to distinguish because they are partially embedded in the matrix) , as the fossil fauna of the Lower Hunter Valley area comprise brachiopods, bivalves (Eurydesma), gastropods, crinoids, bryozoans (Fenestella, Polypora), blastoids, trilobites in the Permian marine strata, also, plants material like stumps/trunks of Dadoxylon, Phyllotheca, leaves of Glossopteris are present in the Permian terrestrial sediments. It depends where and in which formation are you hunting. :)

 

There is a quick guide for that ( pdf ), and some nice fossil examples here .

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