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NWGeoFan

Oregon Coast Shell Fossil - Please put any guesses even bad ones

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NWGeoFan

I figured it was a mollusk, but my knowledge of such is very limited. I have made a shot in the dark that it is Gryphea? But I am unsure if it would even fit the time period (Miocene) or the location of the Astoria Formation in Oregon. Please put any guesses you may have even if they seem totally wrong.

 

By the way Its glossy texture is due to a coating i put on it due to its tendency to flake off pieces, not the fossils look.

IMG_0624.JPG

IMG_0623.JPG

IMG_0625.JPG

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doushantuo

yes,but beware of revisions.Remember,it's from 1963.

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Wrangellian

It looks similar to #15 in the first plate, to me.

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TqB

Looks like Exogyra, which is apparently just Jurassic-Cretaceous.

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TqB
16 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

 

It curves the wrong way for Exogyra unless the image has been reversed.

 

Aha, thanks. I hadn't realised there was a right way...

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FossilDAWG

Check out Crepidula.

 

Don

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RJB

Im thinkin the princess slipper, Crepidula?

 

RB

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NWGeoFan
4 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

Check out Crepidula.

 

Don

Thanks for the ID after looking online it looks very much like Crepidula. Thank you!

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Yvie

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3860152/Meet-Jeremy-left-handed-snail-looking-love-Creature-help-uncover-genes-rare-heart-condition.html

 

 

This article is about a left coiled snail 

6 hours ago, TqB said:

 

Aha, thanks. I hadn't realised there was a right way...

Is there a right or wrong way,as this article on a living snail shows it is possible to be a mirror image,so one would assume the same genetic probability could have occurred way back when.

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Yvie

Jeremy Snail found love too,two more left coil snails have been found for him,but they went off and mated!!Sorry to go off piste!

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Boesse

Yes this is definitely a Crepidula. Perhaps Astoria Formation near Newport?

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NWGeoFan
2 minutes ago, Boesse said:

Yes this is definitely a Crepidula. Perhaps Astoria Formation near Newport?

Yes thats exactly where

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NWGeoFan
3 minutes ago, abyssunder said:

Crepidula praerupta - an extinct, androgynous, clawlike snail, which moved in colonies linked together, but ... :)

 

Is not the  only Crepidula species gastropod present in the Astoria FormationW.O. Addicott. 1976. Molluscan paleontology of the lower Miocene Clallam Formation, northwestern Washington. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 976:1-44

 

2selection.thumb.jpg.6aa6e7f3710a6d6ac25475188337086e.jpg

 

"
Crepidula praerupta (Conrad, 1849) (pl. 1, figs. 1, 22; pl. 2, fig. 24].

This species, occurring in several collections from the Clallam Formation, is externally similar to C. princeps Conrad, with which it occurs in the Clallam, but the internal septum is different. The external morphology of these two species is so variable, that it cannot always be used to distinguish them. On specimens of C. praerupta the insertions of the internal septum are approximately equidistant from the beak (pl. 1, fig. 1) whereas on C. princeps the edge of the septum defines a broadly open “S” and the insertions of the septum are at unequal distances from the beak (pl. 1, fig. 7). Crepidula praerupta ranges from the early Miocene (Loel and Corey, 1932; Kanno, 1971) to the late Miocene (Moore, 1963).

 

Crepidula princeps (Conrad, 1855) (pl. 1, figs. 6, 7].

A few deformed specimens of this moderately large Crepidula occur in the Clallam. The strongly curved septal margin of this species (pl. 1, fig. 7) is one of the most distinctive specific characters. Crepidula princeps ranges from the early Miocene to the Pleistocene along the Pacific coast (Addicott, 1970a, p. 64). This is the first record of C. princeps from the Pacific Northwest States. A moderately large, suborbicular Crepidula from the Sooke Formation of southwestern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (USGS loc. M4060), has the same septal configuration as C. princeps; it may represent this species, but the weakly inflated, suborbicular shell and the blunt apex suggest that it is
a distinct species, possibly C. sookensis Clark and Arnold.

 

Crepidula rostralis (Conrad, 1865) (pl. 2, figs. 23, 25).
The Clallam record of this species constitutes another range extension; it was previously known only from provincial middle Miocene strata (Addicott, 1970a).
The illustrated specimen is deformed, as are most of the specimens of Crepidula from the Clallam. It is slender and elongate during the early stages of growth; the flattening is inferred to have been caused by subsequent deformation. This specimen has the pointed beak overhanging, or extending beyond, the aperture; this beak is characteristic of C. rostralis and enables this species to be readily differentiated from other species. "

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks you for going in depth into it, I will definitely get to work on trying to figure out which one it is.

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abyssunder

Just to see what the remarkable men (doushantuo, Wrangellian) were referring to, before my late post, I'll put here the plate from E. J. Moore. 1963. Miocene marine mollusks from the Astoria Formation in Oregon. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 419:1-109 .

 

5927623c7222c_Plate1.thumb.jpg.c6c7007ed338909cdee2cf4c028d380e.jpg5927624323140_Plate.1_text.thumb.jpg.29da22808e7512fc3c85ac0a2f5a3f8e.jpg

 

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NWGeoFan

Oh that will be helpful thank you!

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doushantuo

"High-level phylogenetic analyses of calyptraeids have led to the discovery of a group of eight cryptic species, all of which were most recently ascribed to
Crepidula aculeata (Gmelin, 1791) (Hoagland, 1977).Crepidula aculeata s.l.has a distinctive shell shape; it is one of the few ‘Crepidula’
that retains clear traces of coiling, the shelf has a distinctive longitudinal ridge and the shell often has numerous spines (Fig. 1)."

 

variability:

"Shell morphology and colour are variable within each population. Some sympatric individuals have numerous fine spines, some have fewer large spines. Some shells are robust, some are small and gracile (Fig. 1).
Shells collected subtidally from Playa Orengo, Argentina are usually completely smooth, although some have numerous large robust spines."

 

BTW,protoconch morphology is crucial in determinig calyptraeids.Just saying.

SO: am I saying this might be Bostrycapulus?

No,I wouldn't dare

 

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doushantuo

protoconch & radula(collin,2005):

 

arvi.jpg

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