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that guy

Fossil of a clam ON an oyster?

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that guy

What would you call this? Does it count as a fossil if it's not in sediment? Saw this on eBay advertised as "One in a Billion Ultra Rare Find: Clam Shell Fossil Imprint on an Oyster Shell" 

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Kane

Welcome to the forum. :)

 

Associations like these are not unheard of, so I certainly would think a claim of "one in a billion" may be a bit of hyperbole ;)

 

Fossils do not have to appear in matrix to be fossils, as some do weather out whole from the matrix. 

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WhodamanHD

Fossils often occur on top of each other because layers of sediment are usually compacted. In addition, oysters like to bind to other organisms while they are alive to anchor themselves.

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that guy

Great! Can you point me to an example, preferably a photo? Also, does it count as a fossil or is it called something else?

Edited by that guy
typo & additional question

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Scylla

One in a billion if you count all the bacteria too. Otherwise finding other shells attatched to oysters is common.

images.jpg

Edited by Scylla
Added picture

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Kane

You can Google "oyster fossil association" and get a few pictures there. And, yes, it does count as a fossil. :)

 

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WhodamanHD

heres an example I found, in a little bit older deposits probably, of a few shells compacted together, they are the circles on the larger one (this pic is from a thread when I asked for an I'd, that's why there is a sketch next to it). Yours is still a fossil btw.

 

IMG_1513.JPG

There are millions of shell like yours and you got one, so he's not really wrong.

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Kane

The technical term is epibiont, and there are those in palaeontology who specialize in that area. I've read some very interesting papers on brachiopod epibionts as sometimes they can help better fine tune stratigraphic information as index fossils where the host species may straddle a wider range of formations.

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Phevo

It's fairly common in Denmark at least

 

The oyster attached itself to a shell, sponge or something else and grew. 

 

Later on the oyster was preserved and whatever it was attached to was not, ...  leaving an impression like the one on the picture

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that guy

Thank you all, that makes so much more sense!  

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doushantuo

Oysters themselves can grow on different substrates:

ostreede56hb.jpg

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Herb

they are quiet common.

 

Exogyra costa1_Ink_LI.jpg

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JohnBrewer

Rare on a certain auction site often means common ....

 

anyway

 

 

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Carl

They are called xenomorphs ("other forms"). Quite common in some places. But doing a Google image search is difficult because the word has also come to mean "alien..."

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