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frankh8147

New Jersey Cretaceous tooth ID

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frankh8147

Greetings!

I found what I believe to be a tooth in a Cretaceous tributary of Big Brook in Monmouth County NJ and need help with identifification. It is slightly concave at the root and has a hollow section at the tip and one cutting edge, and has an oval cross section. This spot has  yielded a good amount of both terrestrial and marine Cretaceous specimens. It doesn’t seem to match the usual suspects from this area so I would appreciate any help. Thanks! 

-Frank

 

pt best.png

Additional pictures.

pt2.jpg

pt6.jpg

 

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WhodamanHD

I think it's enchodus, here's a similar one I found online.

IMG_1560.JPG

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Darktooth

I don't think this is Enchodus, the curve to this tooth is somewhat different.

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WhodamanHD

Than maybe xiphactinus?

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sixgill pete

We need good clear pictures of the tooth with the tooth being the focal point of the picture. Also pictures of all sides and the root end so we can see the shape of the root. From the pictures provided I can not say it is even a tooth for sure.

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frankh8147
2 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

We need good clear pictures of the tooth with the tooth being the focal point of the picture. Also pictures of all sides and the root end so we can see the shape of the root. From the pictures provided I can not say it is even a tooth for sure.

Thanks, Ill try to work on this tonight - I'm still not the best with taking pictures. Enchodus and xiphactinus are always contenders for unknown teeth but I compared it with roughly 100 other enchodus teeth and several xiphactinus I have found from that area and couldn't find any remotely similar. Ill see if I canfind a way to get clearer pictures.

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Al Dente

Frank- what did you mean when you said it was hollow at the tip? If this is hollow it could be part of a crab claw.

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frankh8147

Maybe hollow wasn't the best word - it is a slight indent  the tip (you can kind of see it in some of the pictures).

Actually Al Dente, it kind of resembles the indent on your needle- like tooth you posted for ID a few years ago..did you ever get an ID on that?

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Al Dente
21 minutes ago, frankh8147 said:

Maybe hollow wasn't the best word - it is a slight indent  the tip (you can kind of see it in some of the pictures).

Actually Al Dente, it kind of resembles the indent on your needle- like tooth you posted for ID a few years ago..did you ever get an ID on that?

 

I never did but when you posted your fossil it reminded me of mine. I know another collector in NC that has found a few. My best guess is that they are fish teeth.

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The Jersey Devil

It almost looks like the very tip of a dorsal fin spine judging by the pictures. If it has small bumps on it it could be hybodont.

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frankh8147
1 hour ago, josephstrizhak said:

It almost looks like the very tip of a dorsal fin spine judging by the pictures. If it has small bumps on it it could be hybodont.

Hmmm.. No bumps on it but fish or shark spine is an interesting thought. I'll try to get some clearer pictures tonight

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frankh8147

Here are the best pictures I could get of it; couldn't get a good one of the cross section but it is a thin oval.

 

bb12.jpg

bb13.jpg

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njfossilhunter

I'm just thinking that the Hoploparia Lobster hand one very long pincher claw ..It might be a H. Gabbi or another species that might be in the cretaceous coastal plains 

15726774142_e229751a36_b.jpg

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frankh8147

Certainly a possibility Tony. Only thing that gets me is the enamal which looks more 'toothy' than crustacean

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Troodon

The surface texture of your specimen with your latest pictures does not give me a toothy look, not smooth enough.  The shape is also odd for a fish tooth, the lack cutting edges does not help.   Don't have answers.

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JohnBrewer

Looks pterosaur ish to me. Is the enamel very thin? Got a shot from the root end? @Troodon

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Mike from North Queensland

I would suspect the fish or shark spine or is the way to look based on the last photos.

The diagonal lines that are seen on one side are they scratch marks or flaw lines ?

 

Mike D'Arcy

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frankh8147
7 minutes ago, Mike from North Queensland said:

I would suspect the fish or shark spine or is the way to look based on the last photos.

The diagonal lines that are seen on one side are they scratch marks or flaw lines ?

 

Mike D'Arcy

Mike,

 

Those are scratch marks.

 

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Troodon
1 hour ago, JohnBrewer said:

Looks pterosaur ish to me. Is the enamel very thin? Got a shot from the root end? @Troodon

 

Won't rule it out and a possibility but still don't see a toothy surface.  More like what others has said spine or claw.

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frankh8147

Here is my best effort to get the 'root'; the black part has more shine than is shown in the picture. -Frank

 

root 1.jpg

And another picture under different lighting.

last.jpg

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Plax

crabs sometimes have different claws. A crusher and a picker. I think this might be a picker claw bit and judging from the scale (a US dime) it may be from a callionassid or mud shrimp claw. Didn't research if callionassids have heteromorphic claws though.

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