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Two fossils that need ID


WhodamanHD

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WhodamanHD

Two things from trilobite ridge. I have absolutely no idea what the first one is, but I'm hoping it's a weird deformed trilobite cephalon, although it's probably not. Is the second (a corkscrew) a crinoid? It's different from the ones I've seen. Sorry one of the first got mixed up in the second.

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First one does not look fossil to Me, the second is a crinoid stalk.

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Second one looks like it might be an archimedes bryozoan stem. It seems to taper in width to the right. :) 

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2 minutes ago, jewelonly said:

Second one looks like it might be an archimedes bryozoan stem. It seems to taper in width to the right. :) 

There is no spiral to the stem- not an archimedes screw.

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WhodamanHD
45 minutes ago, jewelonly said:

Second one looks like it might be an archimedes bryozoan stem. It seems to taper in width to the right. :) 

Btw the Archimedes bryozoan had not yet evolved.

1 hour ago, ynot said:

First one does not look fossil to Me, the second is a crinoid stalk.

 

59 minutes ago, Spinosaurus said:

i think the same about these two

Any idea what the first rock could be? A rock inclusion?

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15 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Any idea what the first rock could be? A rock inclusion?

It looks like a marle limestone.

Often there are differing mineral content that is mixed within the mud that turned to rock and has a differing appearance. (think of a marble cake.)

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The second one does seem to taper so could be an orthocone. Or a tentaculitid if it's small enough.

What size is it?

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Arizona Chris

Second one reminds me of a  tentaculitid type, they are usually about an inch long or so.   

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WhodamanHD
8 minutes ago, Arizona Chris said:

Second one reminds me of a  tentaculitid type, they are usually about an inch long or so.   

 

32 minutes ago, TqB said:

The second one does seem to taper so could be an orthocone. Or a tentaculitid if it's small enough.

What size is it?

It is about an inch, from tentaculites I've seen back in Maryland, there is more slant. But this is probably a different species so maybe, I'm still leaning towards crinoid.

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17 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

 

It is about an inch, from tentaculites I've seen back in Maryland, there is more slant. But this is probably a different species so maybe, I'm still leaning towards crinoid.

 

Doesn't it taper then?

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WhodamanHD
9 minutes ago, TqB said:

 

Doesn't it taper then?

Yeah, I guess it could be a small orthocerid or large tentaculites (I only say large because it's larger than most I've found. I think I have more, I'll see if I can get them out and then maybe with the larger sample size, trends will emerge that can for sure prove one way or another.

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1 hour ago, TqB said:

The second one does seem to taper so could be an orthocone. Or a tentaculitid if it's small enough.

What size is it?

Don't have my ID references with me, but there is a rather large "tentaculid" that occurs in the Glenarie Limestone near there. I have some from just south of Montague, NJ.  The Glenarie is a hard limestone that replaces the Oriskany in that area. Large brachs, gastropods and trilobites. And I have some of those "Tentaculites" that are well over an inch in length and some I seem to recall close to 5mm in diameter.

 

As for the weird shape thingy...at first glance it looked like a massive bryozoan. Hard to tell without close up images. But also look into stromatolites and other massive organisms.  The Coeymans Formation in that area has some reefs of both corals and stromatolites.

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WhodamanHD
21 minutes ago, erose said:

Don't have my ID references with me, but there is a rather large "tentaculid" that occurs in the Glenarie Limestone near there. I have some from just south of Montague, NJ.  The Glenarie is a hard limestone that replaces the Oriskany in that area. Large brachs, gastropods and trilobites. And I have some of those "Tentaculites" that are well over an inch in length and some I seem to recall close to 5mm in diameter.

 

As for the weird shape thingy...at first glance it looked like a massive bryozoan. Hard to tell without close up images. But also look into stromatolites and other massive organisms.  The Coeymans Formation in that area has some reefs of both corals and stromatolites.

Here a picture I found of a similar one of the area, for the weird shape, I'll see if I can get a magnifying glass and get a close up.

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Arizona Chris

Look at the radius of curvature on the ribs as you go down the length.  If they are constant, you have a stem. If the radius gets less than its tapered.

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5 minutes ago, Arizona Chris said:

Look at the radius of curvature on the ribs as you go down the length.  If they are constant, you have a stem. If the radius gets less than its tapered.

I just used a paper to mark width at the beginning and the end and it's definitely tapered, it was hard to tell with its size.

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Arizona Chris

Yes but the radius of curvature on each ring will decrease for a tentaculid.  It will be constant for a crinoid stem.

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5 minutes ago, Arizona Chris said:

Yes but the radius of curvature on each ring will decrease for a tentaculid.  It will be constant for a crinoid stem.

Yes, it does decrease. It should be a tentaculid then?

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It does appear to taper however it also appears to be slightly crushed at the  thinner end which may be giving a misleading impression of the actual width/diameter.

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I'm still not sure which one, could this (which is positioned at the shorter end) be a calyx, or is it just a shell

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Arizona Chris

So I guess its time to go back to this site and find an even better specimen! ;)

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20 minutes ago, Arizona Chris said:

So I guess its time to go back to this site and find an even better specimen! ;)

Yeah, it's a ways from where I live but maybe I'll get back someday. First I have to look through what I have...

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