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Kingofthekats

Dinosaur fossil Claw? Found in PA Need help with ID

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WhodamanHD
20 minutes ago, Kingofthekats said:

Right across from Ordovician is raubsville

That's what I expected, doesn't really rule out anything though, all had evolved (crustaceans, orthocerids,corals,etc). Again more fossils of the same type could help if you find any, then trends may begin to emerge and an obvious ID may become clearer.

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Kingofthekats

I found this close to it as well is this petrified wood?

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WhodamanHD

Now that changes things up. That's definitely plant and it looks Carboniferous, a much later period. It resembles calamites, but I'm far from an expert on Carboniferous things. Now if that makes me wonder about the other find...

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Sagebrush Steve
4 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

I couldn't find any usable geological map of Northampton county. The uneven septa make me think eurypterid tail.

I also support the idea of it being a eurypterid tail, although there may not be enough there to tell.  But it does seem to narrow down toward the bottom like you would expect.  And eurypterids do show up in the Silurian and Ordovician rocks in Pennsylvania.  But I'm not an expert here so I will defer to others who are more knowledgeable.

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RJB

Its a Thing a mu jiggy.  Ha!   Just kidding.  My first thought was Eurypterid.

 

RB

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WhodamanHD

Yay! my gut feel is finally getting more intelligent. You say this was from a mountainous area? Maybe the two fossils from different time periods have been washed from mountains with both aged rocks.

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westcoast
11 hours ago, WhodamanHD said:

Now that changes things up. That's definitely plant and it looks Carboniferous, a much later period. It resembles calamites, but I'm far from an expert on Carboniferous things. Now if that makes me wonder about the other find...

I'm not sure that this is plant, it looks a bit like slickenlines...maybe...

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ynot

I agree with westcoast, slickensides.

This is the marks left when 2 sides of a fault slide past eack other and leave scrape marks.

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WhodamanHD
18 minutes ago, ynot said:

I agree with westcoast, slickensides.

This is the marks left when 2 sides of a fault slide past eack other and leave scrape marks.

 

49 minutes ago, westcoast said:

I'm not sure that this is plant, it looks a bit like slickenlines...maybe...

I didn't know those existed! Now that I have looked up pictures I agree.

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doushantuo

maybe not necessarily slickensides

 

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ynot
6 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

maybe not necessarily slickensides

a form of intersection lineation?

Different name for the same thing(?)

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doushantuo

as you can see ,I edited that post.

Let me TRY to give the inside dope here:

source:doblas,tectonophys/1998)

 

slickensimolluscboranpbercofimages.jpg

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ynot
2 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

Let me TRY to give the inside dope here:

Never seen that one before.

Aren't they naming the different types of slickensides? Kind of like genus and species?

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doushantuo

Because of the shineyness/polished look  ,my thoughts are tending towards slickensides

 

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ynot
6 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

Because of the shineyness/polished look  ,my thoughts are tending towards slickensides

 

Really?:rofl:

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doushantuo

yeah:D

Low angle Riedel shears dipping into the wallrock should be a dead giveaway .

I am cautious about naming lineations straightaway as shear indicators,is allB)

PS: thrilled to bit that you find that caution hilarious,BTW:dinothumb:

I would encourage more jocularity in structural geology as a matter of principle.

 

  

 

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Kingofthekats

Going out there now try to sift threw everything I keep you guys updated if there is anything else

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ynot
Just now, Kingofthekats said:

Going out there now try to sift threw everything I keep you guys updated if there is anything else

:popcorn:

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westcoast
On 7/15/2017 at 11:38 PM, Kingofthekats said:

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What are those white flecks on the right side of the second image? This black layer looks somehow man-made to me...

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WhodamanHD
4 hours ago, westcoast said:

What are those white flecks on the right side of the second image? This black layer looks somehow man-made to me...

I would assume that the white flecks are little holes in the rock where calcite has been deposited by water.

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Doctor Mud
20 hours ago, doushantuo said:

yeah:D

Low angle Riedel shears dipping into the wallrock should be a dead giveaway .

I am cautious about naming lineations straightaway as shear indicators,is allB)

PS: thrilled to bit that you find that caution hilarious,BTW:dinothumb:

I would encourage more jocularity in structural geology as a matter of principle.

 

  

 

I wish someone had encouraged more jocularity in my undergrad structural geology lectures. :)

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Doctor Mud

The ancient remains of the distal end of Winklepickerensis.

 

Looks right from this angle.

image.jpeg.72bb818b1c49441c54c5830a2ec6a815.jpeg

 

A reconstruction of a pair:

 

image.jpeg.b3405ba3228e236c94f523b38a7eb895.jpeg

 

 

..... But seriously.

 

Is the sediment inside consolidated - hard or can you easily make an impression with something like a pin.

 

Is the black material flexible or rigid. You could carefully try this.

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Doctor Mud
5 hours ago, westcoast said:

What are those white flecks on the right side of the second image? This black layer looks somehow man-made to me...

I see what you mean west coast.

They do look a bit odd for calcite deposits and may resemble paint splatters. Some mimick the effect of a drop hitting a surface at an angle - I.e teardrop shape.

 

Just throwing out ideas and leaving no stone unturned here.

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Kingofthekats

Found another part

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