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WhodamanHD

Need help with some teeth

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WhodamanHD

Until joining this forum, I thought that the kem kem beds were clear cut and simple in terms of teeth, you have crocs, raptors, carcharodantosaurs, and spinosaurs. I was of course, incrediblely wrong. I have acquired a few teeth from various suppliers, and they are of the kem kem beds. I got these way before I joined the forum and I would like to us your collective skills to get the best IDs possible. This will probably be the first of two posts.

first up is a small tooth, labeled deltadromeus agilis, a species of which no skeletal elements are known.

after that are two teeth in a lot of bones apparently from a sulphur mine.

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WhodamanHD

This one I assumed carcharodontosaurus, I know the back needs to be cleaned, as soon as I get a new scribe.

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WhodamanHD

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WhodamanHD

I'm impatient so I'm calling in some experts now

@Troodon

@zekky

 

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zekky

The top one, if it doesn't have serrations is a spinosaur, can't tell though. The second one is probably carch. The last few are either too covered in matrix, or not teeth, better pic are needed.

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JohnBrewer

Need much better pictures with better lighting. Oh and a scale preferably in cm/mm as that's the international standard in the sciences. If any of the teeth are fairly small and/or fairly flat a flatbed scanner is great. See pic below but I have scanned much larger teeth. IMG_5882.thumb.PNG.3ecc5ae8ab117b398e5a0b7c3fa3d9bf.PNG

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WhodamanHD
4 minutes ago, JohnBrewer said:

Need much better pictures with better lighting. Oh and a scale preferably in cm/mm as that's the international standard in the sciences. If any of the teeth are fairly small and/or fairly flat a flatbed scanner is great. See pic below but I have scanned much larger teeth. IMG_5882.thumb.PNG.3ecc5ae8ab117b398e5a0b7c3fa3d9bf.PNG

Okay,  will try scanning them shortly.

14 hours ago, zekky said:

The top one, if it doesn't have serrations is a spinosaur, can't tell though. The second one is probably carch. The last few are either too covered in matrix, or not teeth, better pic are needed.

There a three teeth, the first one does have small serrations. I suspected carcharodontosaurus for the second, that I you for the confirmation, I'm working on better pictures.

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JohnBrewer

Forgot to say I agree with Zekky. A big problem for me is I almost always check the forum on an iDevice! 

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WhodamanHD
13 minutes ago, JohnBrewer said:

Forgot to say I agree with Zekky. A big problem for me is I almost always check the forum on an iDevice! 

It is the same way for me, hence the low quality pictures.

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WhodamanHD
19 hours ago, zekky said:

The top one, if it doesn't have serrations is a spinosaur, can't tell though. The second one is probably carch. The last few are either too covered in matrix, or not teeth, better pic are needed.

 

5 hours ago, JohnBrewer said:

Need much better pictures with better lighting. Oh and a scale preferably in cm/mm as that's the international standard in the sciences. If any of the teeth are fairly small and/or fairly flat a flatbed scanner is great. See pic below but I have scanned

Scanner didn't work great, heres what I got

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I am now thinking that the last one is bone, it doesn't have enamel and it's a lot spongier

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zekky

The top two are too fragmented to ID, can't even be sure they are dinosaur. The bottom one doesn't look like a tooth.

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hxmendoza

the second tooth looks like a Carcharodontosaur tooth fragment. The third "tooth" looks like a bone fragment. At first I thought that the first tooth tip was a Spinosaur tooth tip, but you say there are serrations. The photos are not very clear so I will abstain from giving an opinion on it. Though there is the possibility it is the tip fragment off of one of the more anterior and inflated Carcharodontosaur teeth.

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WhodamanHD
6 hours ago, zekky said:

The top two are too fragmented to ID, can't even be sure they are dinosaur. The bottom one doesn't look like a tooth.

One of them you already IDed as carcharodontosaurus, are you retracting this?

4 hours ago, hxmendoza said:

the second tooth looks like a Carcharodontosaur tooth fragment. The third "tooth" looks like a bone fragment. At first I thought that the first tooth tip was a Spinosaur tooth tip, but you say there are serrations. The photos are not very clear so I will abstain from giving an opinion on it. Though there is the possibility it is the tip fragment off of one of the more anterior and inflated Carcharodontosaur teeth.

This ipad and the scanner are both horrid at photography of small things, I need to get a camera....

there are definitely serrations, although small, on both sides of the small tooth. I'm happy that my carch suspicions are now corroborated, thank you for your help!

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WhodamanHD

Here's a picture of the one unidentified tooth from the top down, if that helps. any ideas as to what it is?

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