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hemi123

sediment formation

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hemi123

Newbie here, so forgive me plain simple words. So I have been trying to research how to find areas that would show exposed sediment layers down the the marl, i.e...ditches, slopes,,I know this would be a game changer for anyone regarding fossils and where they are deposited but a clue would help. Or, I guess I can keep piling on the miles and hours to find them. 

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SailingAlongToo

@hemi123

Many of the terrain features in the Atlantic Coastal Plains are cut by water. Look for ravines, drainage cuts, drainage ways and along creeks / streams / rivers that have high banks. You should be able to see various stratigraphy layers in the banks. Remember though, all land is owned by someone and it varies state by state. In VA, landowners on tidal water own to the mean low tide mark. In NC and MD it is to the mean high water mark. Pretty much, if you dig in the banks, bluffs, cliffs, etc. you are damaging someone's property. In some places it is illegal to dig in any water way bank or bottom.

 

There are also several other options that may be more appealing than trespassing or destruction of property.

1) Research and join a local fossil or mineral club. Many do several guided trips a year that members can participate in.

2) Volunteer with a local museum that does field research. Most are happy to have volunteers to help out in the field and at the museum. You can learn a lot doing this.

3) Research online for various fossil sites with public access in your area. Countless publications are available online.

4) Contact your state Geological Survey. Many have publications and point you to publicly accessible fossil areas.

5) Make friends with other TFF members around you. Some will take you out on hunts as long as you honor their request about not disclosing site locations. Obviously, you have to build rapport and trust with them first. I've personally taken a dozen or so TFF members out hunting and even showed a few secret spots to a couple.

 

Just some thoughts.


Good luck.

 

SA2

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Sharks of SC

There haven't been many extensive geological maps of South Carolina, or the lowcountry in particular as far as I know. But...after a while you can begin to pick out individual layers by eye. For instance, spend enough time looking for fossils in Summerville, on the banks of the local rivers, at the beach etc., etc.,..and eventually you'll begin to notice differences in the coloration and preservation of fossils from those respective spots. Additionally the sediment itself differs greatly in appearance. For example, in my experience the Chandler Bridge Fm. will be a little softer and lighter and contain better-preserved Oligocene fossils, later Mio-Plio layers are often more compact, thick with phosphate nodules, teeth and bones are often black with less-exceptional preservation. 

Picking up on these subtle variances takes time and a lot of observation, but eventually can lead you to finding incredible shark teeth and fossils. 

Take care,

SOSC

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WhodamanHD

Google maps may save some time, look for deep cutting river, sea cliffs, roadcuts, etc....

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SailingAlongToo
43 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

Google maps may save some time, look for deep cutting river, sea cliffs, ro loadcuts, etc....

 

USGS Topo Maps are also very useful and are available on line. You just have to know how to read them. 

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hemi123

Thanks for all the advice

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flyg

You may have already seen the map linked below. It is a masterpiece and represents the condensed findings of years of hard work. Don't mess around viewing it online--download the pdf. It displays clearly even when zoomed in to >600%. There are enough feature details in terms of roads/waterways etc. to translate locations to Google Earth just by eyeball and a side-by-side comparison. The grid lines are in UTM, which you can choose as a setting in Google Earth, but the scale is too coarse to be much use.

 

https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1030/

 

G

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Lee Taylor

The low country of South Carolina is quite flat with very little in the way of cliffs or exposed bluffs. In my experience the methods that have produced the most are:

 

1. Searching the river bottoms using SCUBA (acquire a collectors license)

2. Walking the creeks 20 miles inland (get permission from landowner)

 

 

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