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Worms from the (Waco) pit


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Last week while visiting Waco, Texas, I took four of my grandchildren to the Waco Research Pit.  After getting a permit, we spent about three hours there and among the more fascinating fossils we found were oysters (possibly of the genus Texigryphaea).  Of special interest were the epibionts, some of which seem to be parasitic.  There were at least two sizes of tube worms, and bryozoans.  The second picture below is not of epibionts on an oyster, but rather a one-inch wide piece I found separately in the same area.  If I understand correctly, the Waco Pit is in the Del Rio Clay Formation, Cenomanian Stage, Cretaceous.  It was a nice trip and a great place to take children.  

 

Russ

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looks like You had fun with the grandkids!

Nice finds too.

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Nice finds!

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Fossil-Hound

Excellent finds and neat preservation.

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Yes, that is definitely Texigryphaea. Based on location the species should be easy to pin down.  I am also interested in all the various "Serpulid" worms we find in the Cretaceous of Texas. Only a few species have been identified but they seem to be catch-alls. I have started labelling some of mine as types: Serpulid type A, S. type B, etc. Maybe in the future someone will do the work on these ubiquitous creatures and we can apply actual proper names.

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Thanks for the confirmation of that genus.  I looked a little more online and found this nice list of species with links to photos.  It seems clear from the Del Rio location and the photos that my specimens are Texigraphaea roemeri.  

 

44 minutes ago, erose said:

all the various "Serpulid" worms we find in the Cretaceous of Texas

 

These are fascinating. 

 

Thanks for the input.

 

Russ

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I see bryozoan and clionid (boring sponge) also

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Thanks for this information.  I was wondering what made the bore holes.  Many of these oysters show a lot of damage from predation--its seems to have been quite an aggressive environment.

 

Russ

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17 hours ago, KCMOfossil said:

Thanks for the confirmation of that genus.  I looked a little more online and found this nice list of species with links to photos.  It seems clear from the Del Rio location and the photos that my specimens are Texigraphaea roemeri.  

 

 

These are fascinating. 

 

Thanks for the input.

 

Russ

Well first of all Russ a question.

Are you here in Texas for an extended visit?

If so you may want to visit some of the Grayson deposits near the Arlington/Handley area set between Dallas and Ft. Worth.

It is the equivalent to the Del Rio formation and any of the specimens you find down there may be found here as well.

The Texigraphaea are quite abundant here and other species of oyster are found here as well.

I have hunted the Del Rio and Grayson for over 30 years and find that I never go to either without finding something interesting.

The tubular specimens are interesting in that it sheds some light on the fact that the specimen lay exposed on the bottom of the primordial

ocean floor long enough for them to form. I find other specimens including echinoids with these attached.

Always a cool find.

 

Jess B.

 

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7 hours ago, bone2stone said:

the Grayson deposits near the Arlington/Handley area set between Dallas and Ft. Worth

 

I'm back in Kansas City now.  I only go to Waco once or twice a year for a week or less.  When I'm there we are pretty busy, so I have to restrict my fossil trips to places within about 45 minutes of Waco (actually, Hewitt).  

 

Interesting comment about the story that can be read from the fact that the tube worms are present on these specimens.  I find epibionts fascinating in that regard.  They show an aspect of interaction (a slice of life) between species beyond what an individual species fossil can show.

 

Russ

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Enjoyed seeing the finds. Thanks for showing us. 

 

Regards, Chris 

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