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RobinRFlores

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Wendell Ricketts

It's the kind of egg that's a rock and not a fossil, unfortunately.

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Location? Size?

 

Not an egg. Looks like chert nodule, but further information could change that opinion.

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You may be in a rush to assume too much here. This is likely geologic and not an egg. Do a search on Google for images of fossil eggs. Also, it is a good idea to provide some kind of scale with the image so we know how large it is, and location information of where it was found. Size and location are absolute necessities when it comes to assisting us in performing a proper identification.

 

Topic moved to Fossil ID.

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Eggs are a thin outer layer and have specific texture, think of a chicken egg texture. This is a broken concretion.

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Fossildude19

Agreed,... this is not an egg. 

No eggshell texture or even eggshell present.

Regards,

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It's a rock.

 

Have you had an opportunity yet to locate a geological map of your area? A little knowledge is always in season! :) 

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This, too, is a rock. Probably best to start a new thread. ;) 

 

I would also look up "pareidolia." Mother nature does like to throw the odd curveball in making us see stuff that tricks us. 

 

And I'm quite serious about you spending some internet time locating a geological map of your area. You will learn a great deal! :) 

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sixgill pete

@RobinRFlores  

 

Hello Robin and welcome to the forum. I am going to offer you some advice and insight. First, you need to learn something about the geology of your area and what types of fossils you can find there. By geology I mean the age of the sediments around you. I looked up the town you mentioned and see that it is slightly southwest of San Antonio. From what I see on a map it looks like you are in lower Eocene Clairborne Group.

 

Now that i found that so easily, try looking online to see what types of fossils are found and see what they look like. We want to help you all we can, but assuming you have found horns and toes and heads and teeth from animals that are not known from those sediments pushes our patience to its limit. Look at pictures of fossils on here and other sources online and learn what they look like so you can differentiate between a fossil and a rock.

 

Edit:  I will add that my finding of Eocene Clairborne Group is not positive. If your location is slightly further west than I approximated, you would be in Cretaceous Eagle Ford I believe. 

Edited by sixgill pete
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The first one would be an egg-shaped pseudofossil, a pretty nice broken chert / flint nodule, showing the conchoidal fractures. Take a look here .

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