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Paleoworld-101

Weird Marine Reptile Teeth- Help!

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Paleoworld-101

I collected these two small marine reptile teeth at the council fossil hunting site 2 near Richmond in Queensland, Australia. The location is a Cretaceous marine locality and exposes the Toolebuc Formation, about 100 million years old. Fossils of fish, sharks, ichthyosaurs, pliosaurs and other types of plesiosaur, pterosaurs and turtles are all known from the area. 

 

These two teeth i believe could be associated, as they were found in the same fishy layer less than 30 centimetres from one another and exhibit similar features. Marine reptile teeth are also not very common here in general so it would be quite coincidental. 

 

The main options are Ichthyosaur (Platypterygius australis) or some kind of plesiosaur. I am leaning towards plesiosaur but would like more opinions. Both teeth have a weird appearance where the enamel covers the tip of the tooth only, then there is a middle section with no enamel that is quite smoothened off and finally at the base of both teeth the crown-root junction appears to be reached. I originally thought the middle section being free of enamel was simply a wear-related thing but the fact that both teeth are like this and especially in the smaller one the feature seems to be quite clear so i'm now confused. The closest match i have so far seen from browsing pictures is teeth of the polycotylid plesiosaur Dolichorhynchops. Obviously this genus is not present in this location, but there is however an unnamed polycotylid plesiosaur from Richmond. Perhaps these teeth come from this animal?

 

The smaller tooth measures only 12 mm and the larger one 19 mm. 

 

Tooth 1

 

IMG_1849.thumb.JPG.b4f28154e1a7a83f91df5296dd7e0d47.JPG

 

IMG_1850.thumb.JPG.ffde6c97205eaedd0420974ea8319903.JPG

 

IMG_1855.thumb.JPG.b2ad614fa9bb056311fb22217464c9a4.JPG

 

 

Tooth 2

 

IMG_1856.thumb.JPG.203de5bf91617b022b7415a798b0357c.JPG

 

IMG_1861.thumb.JPG.78289cf819045908ba5c8c50d0a57870.JPG

 

IMG_1887.thumb.JPG.e416f1ee4ec0f55f5224b9e8fab114e3.JPG

 

 

For comparison, here is a picture of the teeth of Dolychorhynchops

The smaller ones especially resemble my smaller tooth above in shape, but don't seem to have the same smooth mid section before the root

 

KUVP1300-5.jpg.757273ee060b930e7fd587a0f2180a99.jpg

 

 

To make things even more interesting, i also found this similar tooth last year from Richmond but at a different locality. The general consensus on this forum was that it was plesiosaurian not ichthyosaur. It also has a clearly enameled tip then a smooth or non enameled mid section and then possibly the top of the root at the very bottom. Another coincidence? Am i completely nuts? I'll let you decide :D 

 

post-5373-0-46125900-1468818915.thumb.jpg.6bb936c97576c74e2462a18da054785a.jpg

 

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Paleoworld-101

Where are the marine reptile people??

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ynot
2 hours ago, Paleoworld-101 said:

Where are the marine reptile people??

Probably out hunting for fossils, it is the weekend after all.

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Paleoworld-101

Gonna keep bumping this until i get at least one legitimate response... 

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ynot

@JohnBrewer might have an idea.

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Foozil

Maybe try to contact Tim Holland or Patrick somehow? 

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Jesuslover340

Asked one of the curators (Michelle) for you; said they'll have a response by tomorrow :)

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Jesuslover340

Also asked another member of this forum that isn't on often but has a few plesiosaur, ichthyosaur, and pliosaur teeth-he thinks definitely plesiosaur, possibly Doli. Also said he believes the striations did once fully cover the crowns and that their absence is probably from wear or post-preservation exposure.

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Foozil

I'm gonna say the first two teeth are ichthyosaur, the striations are very similar to mine. I, of course, and no expert though.

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Paleoworld-101
21 hours ago, Foozil said:

Maybe try to contact Tim Holland or Patrick somehow? 

Yeah i will if we can't resolve it ourselves. 

18 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Asked one of the curators (Michelle) for you; said they'll have a response by tomorrow :)

Thanks Skye!! 

11 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Also asked another member of this forum that isn't on often but has a few plesiosaur, ichthyosaur, and pliosaur teeth-he thinks definitely plesiosaur, possibly Doli. Also said he believes the striations did once fully cover the crowns and that their absence is probably from wear or post-preservation exposure.

Logically i also think the middle sections should have been covered too, it's just weird that all three of these potential plesiosaur teeth i have found show this feature. For the first two it would have to have been wear before deposition occurred as i dug them straight out of fresh in-situ layers. 

3 hours ago, Foozil said:

I'm gonna say the first two teeth are ichthyosaur, the striations are very similar to mine. I, of course, and no expert though.

Got any pics? 

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Paleoworld-101

I have just exposed more of the first, smaller tooth and added a couple more pictures below.

 

IMG_1911.thumb.JPG.2004545532b768b664907c26c47f48d6.JPG

 

IMG_1915.thumb.JPG.0f340c4e5c9db79784771ebb43635249.JPG

 

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Jesuslover340

"Hi Skyelar, they are an ichthyosaur tooth and plesiosaur tooth in that order. Sorry I thought it was only Tooth 1 & 2 that Paleoworld-101 was asking about. Tooth 3 is perhaps plesiosaur - difficult to see curvature on tooth without further prep. Only one species of Ichthy in Aust that I am aware of. No further info for plesiosaur. Cheers, Michelle"

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Foozil

"one species of icthyosaur in Australia" 

There are some other un-named ones from the area, I believe.

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Paleoworld-101
42 minutes ago, Jesuslover340 said:

"Hi Skyelar, they are an ichthyosaur tooth and plesiosaur tooth in that order. Sorry I thought it was only Tooth 1 & 2 that Paleoworld-101 was asking about. Tooth 3 is perhaps plesiosaur - difficult to see curvature on tooth without further prep. Only one species of Ichthy in Aust that I am aware of. No further info for plesiosaur. Cheers, Michelle"

Thanks for posting this. I guess they aren't associated then, strange that they were so close though considering how uncommon teeth like this are in general. 

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