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deutscheben

My Pennsylvanian Shark Teeth

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deutscheben    35
deutscheben

Over the last two years I have been able to collect a small but diverse group of shark and other chondrichthyan teeth from Pennsylvanian deposits in Illinois. Actually, all but one of the teeth are from one exposure of the La Salle Limestone of the Bond Formation- the other tooth was found in some roadside rip rap limestone in Central Illinois which seems to share many species with the La Salle, but unfortunately I have no way of determining the exact origin. 

 

Here is the first tooth, this is the one collected from rip rap in northern Champaign County. It is a cladodont type tooth, although unfortunately most of the main tooth and some of the cusps are missing. The tooth is 15 mm across at the widest point.

 

598f55218b98d_2017-08-1214_18_50.thumb.jpg.12b133a3c524187bccc4a1fbc6e28785.jpg

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deutscheben    35
deutscheben

I have posted the next two teeth in the Fossil of the Month contests and although they didn't win, they are still some of my favorite fossils that I have found so far. :P The first is a lovely little Peripristis semicircularis. It is about 12 mm wide.

 

20161129_080018_2.thumb.jpg.c45b978f7d0d4a33f97ba88bed7cc43f.jpg

 

The second is a Cochliodus sp., which is about 25 mm long.

 

5904ecea852fe_2017-04-2914_40_14.thumb.jpg.155abd3aa74d255c0f294cd12ad167e1.jpg

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deutscheben    35
deutscheben

The next tooth is the biggest I have found yet at this site, a Petalodus ohioensis. Although it was nearly complete when I found it, unfortunately the block it was in split between the crown and root after I got it home, which split the tooth as well. I have been slowly working on trying to prep out the parts that got separated and reassemble it. Thankfully the crown remained largely intact. 

 

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I have also found some partial teeth at the site as well- the first image is an (I think) incomplete Chomatodus sp., which is 8 mm wide.

 

598f5a1fc1fcb_2017-08-1214_19_51.thumb.jpg.aa8716d759220dac7d39487a13fe9147.jpg

 

Here are some of the other partial teeth I have recovered- a chunk of another Petalodus and a cladodont tooth that shattered when I tried to remove it from the 300 pound block it was in on one of my early trips to the site. I felt like a real idiot after that, and I now come prepared with the proper tools so I don't suffer heartbreak like that again.

 

598f5af1dff26_2017-08-1214_19_20.thumb.jpg.98bb6febfafd694ffcd7c7ecbbc26515.jpg

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ynot    1,946
ynot

Nice collection.

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deutscheben    35
deutscheben

Thanks!

 

And finally, two more miniscule teeth. The first one is a mystery to me- it doesn't quite match any teeth I could find in my guidebooks, but it may just be a broken fragment. It is 6 mm across.

 

598f5dce2ff03_2017-08-1214_56_35.thumb.jpg.08662e86bdb5f5e1688d1e87eea7be2a.jpg

 

And here is the last tooth and also the least at only 5 mm across- another cladodont of some sort. Although it's tiny, it is mostly complete, and I find its minute details enchanting.

 

20170812_131410-1.thumb.jpg.4c18c5acaff47f051ee1daebcc152cbb.jpg

 

 

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Bullsnake    57
Bullsnake

Loving it!

Can i ask what reference(s) you're using?

Your Cochliodus sp. looks like Deltodus, but I'm no authority on the subject. I could certainly use some good references.

Great collection!

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deutscheben    35
deutscheben

Thanks @Bullsnake! I use the Illinois Geological Survey published in the mid-1800s as a start, because it has illustrated plates of an enormous variety of fossils from my home state. A digital copy can be found online at the Internet Archive, too, so you don't need to own the physical books. After that, then I check this board, or the Oceans of Kansas site http://oceansofkansas.com or J-Elasmo site http://naka.na.coocan.jp/index.htm, all of which have many photos of Paleozoic shark teeth, and also have more up to date information on the correct classification of the teeth.

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Fossildude19    3,498
Fossildude19

These are wonderful! 

Thanks for showing us - I really like to see these early shark teeth. :) 

Regards,

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ynot    1,946
ynot

Nice finds!

Thanks for sharing.

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fossilized6s    319
fossilized6s

Beautiful teeth! Thanks for sharing. 

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