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I went to Yaxley today, and after processing most of my finds I'm left with a few puzzles.

I recently found an echinoid spine, and was wondering whether the first one below is part of an echinoid test, The second was picked up as a belemnite, but the cross section looks wrong, and I've seen echinoid spines in museums of a similar shape. The third bobbly one I have no clue, and would be grateful for any suggestions. I've called it Mr Bobbly. Finds are from Yaxley, UK, Jurassic, Lower Oxford Clay, Callovian. ETA: the order of the photos changed as I posted, the first fossil is the round black one in the images, the second is the very pale belemnite-like one, including cross sections, and the third is the long bobbly one.

 

Bobbly.jpg

Echinoid mic 1.jpg

Echinoid.jpg

Echinoid 2a.jpg

Echinoid 2b.jpg

Echinoid2c.jpg

Mr Bobbly.jpg

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The top and bottom ones remind me of shrimp burrow, forget exact name, something like thassanoides.

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Fossildude19
59 minutes ago, WhodamanHD said:

The top and bottom ones remind me of shrimp burrow, forget exact name, something like thassanoides.

Thalassinoides. ;) 

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1 hour ago, Fossildude19 said:

Thalassinoides. ;) 

At least I was close! Hopefully I remember it next time.

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The second one is a fusiform belemnite, Hibolithes hastata, which is common at Yaxley.

The front (blunt) end of these is poorly calcified, probably originally aragonitic, so the usual radiating fibrous structure is obscured. The single furrow in that area is characteristic of the genus.

 

The umbilicus at the tip is unusual for this species but quite common in belemnites generally - possibly a slight pathology in this one.

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Arizona Chris

Unless of course it is the variant of thalassinoides with a pelleted wall, then its ophiomorpha.  Here I see no pellets however....

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