Jump to content
caldigger

Successful Experiment

Recommended Posts

ynot

Nice experiment.

Really shows how quick a bone can get to look like a fossil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDudeCO

Oh wow!!

That is crazy, not long at all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jesuslover340

I'm  curious if it changed the weight at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LordTrilobite

Pretty uncanny. I'm interested to hear about the weight as well. Or maybe the hot needle of lick test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

Well I'm not going to attempt to lick it or burn it...we already know it isn't old. I don't believe the weight really changed at all.

The whole purpose behind the project was to prove it takes no time at all for nature to give the appearance of age. So the other tests should be utilized to prove actual aging rather than taking physical appearance as an indicator.

Olaf, if you like, you are welcome to lick it to your hearts content. I saw the rotted carcases from which they came. Yuck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pagurus

Thanks for that useful experiment. It looks like it belongs in a museum display. I never would have guessed the animal died just this past winter. Interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Malcolmt

Thank you for sharing... learn something new everyday. Now all I have to do is find my first bone......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDudeCO

Mail it this way, I'll lick it.

It might be a bit overcooked for my tastes though :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aplomado

One month!  I would not have guessed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

I did another batch with the leg bone (bovine) from the comparison picture above and two jaws, a deer and most probably a squirrel.  I forgot to snap a picture of them before shipping out. Now just awaiting Blake @FossilDudeCO to post a picture. I left them in the "solution" ( water and dried leaves) for five weeks this time. The leg bone, given its thickness, took a bit longer to soak up the color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brazos Aaron

That is amazing!  Thank you so much for doing this experiment. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia
On 23.8.2017 at 1:10 AM, caldigger said:

 

So the other tests should be utilized to prove actual aging rather than taking physical appearance as an indicator.

 

Me being not a bone man, it sure would interest me to see a list of these tests.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle Siphuncle

On bones for which I can't readily ascertain age, I'll first tap on it with a rock and listen to the sound signature.  High pitched and glassy implies mineralization, while a dull thud often implies recent.  Next comes destructive testing.  I'll sometimes snap a little piece off of a worn area.  If it bends before breaking, it still has collagen remaining and is therefore recent.  If brittle fracture results, I reason that collagen has leached out, and I also gain a peek at cross sectional wall thickness, and can glean additional info such as how deep surface stain has penetrated.  All these factors together give me a better feel for age.  I tend not to do the burn test personally, as all burning bones stink to me, and my stink-o-meter must be out of calibration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilus

One thing that I've found is that sometimes even clearly identifiable extinct fossil bones (mammoth or mastodon) have little or no mineralization.  I've found elephant vertebrae that are as little mineralized as the cow that died in last years flood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RJB

Very interesting!

 

RB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KimTexan

That’s fascinating how they change color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nimravis

Very nice Doren

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max-fossils

Huh, that's really interesting! Makes me want to test if all my Ice Age bones really are fossils :headscratch:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

I really wish Blake @FossilDudeCO 

would come back to the forum. I sent him three really nice "experimental" pieces, but forgot to photograph them before they were sent. He left the forum right after he received them, so maybe someday he will get a shot of them and post for us to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnBrewer

Interesting experiment Doren. Bone is calcium carbonate and being soaked in tannic acid has made calcium tannate rather than stained the bone tho I guess there maybe some staining too. Next time you do it weigh the bone pre and post tannin. I suspect the amount of tannic acid you made was very small and probably only reacted with just the surface so any weight change on regular scales might not be noticeable. I’ve got some lab scales that are accurate to 0.0001g. If I get time I’ll give it a go with tannic acid powder, make a saturated solution and put a snake bone in and see the result. My problem is I’m moving studio next week so am pretty busy but I’ll see what I can do. Oak leaves and oak falls are good. You can get tannic acid commercially, I buy mine from the USA as I use it in photography. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

Interesting John, i live in El Paso de Robles ( Spanish for "Pass of the Oaks" ), so what type of trees do you suppose I have an abundance of around me to gather leaves from. You'd think I would use those.

However, the leaves I mostly used in the experiments were from a different tree growing on the hillside next to my place. Skinny wrinkly leaves and a few Sycamores thrown in for good measure.

Really, this exercise was not meant as a scientific analysis, it was just to show even modern bone can take on the "aged" appearance of a fossil. So we can't just judge that book by the cover.

I for one, ( no matter how sure I am) wont be licking any bones as a proving ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

Well it looks like we may have lost FossilDudeCO for whatever reason, so I will post the brother to the leg bone I sent him. I think the one I sent looked better, but here ya go.

Modern cow leg bone that was soaked in a tannic acid bath (dried leaves and water) for 5 weeks.

Looks like it came straight off of the sifter screen. I only wish you could have seen the jaws, they were spectacular.

 

20171227_163657.jpg

20171227_163616.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caldigger

The jaws actually came out much darker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×