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pambosk

Various big bivalve shells, oysters, perhaps some other stuff

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pambosk

Hello esteemed experts, fellow learners and everyone else. 

I discovered lately, north of limassol, northwest of Amathus ancient city, 15 miles in, a 3miles by 1mile oval-ish rock formation, 300-400 ft tall, nice views villas and many nice fossils.  I am gathering as much as possible, before it gets totally built over (sadly at around 60% now)

So. I know what some of them are, or I could research, but why take the joy of sharing island fossils and the group learning opportunity go to waste? I have 50 or more fossils, 100eds of fragments, many concretions suspected to contain goodies, few nothings, and a lot of excitement! Any prep work needed was done with a small geometry tool with 2 needles (diabetes i thing) and  custom made iron chisel, with a soft handle so that no hammer is needed. 

 

1)big fatty 1/2 bivalve, 6x6x4cm

 

T.B.C

 

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pambosk

1)big fatty 1/2 bivalve (part 2)

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pambosk

2) nice looking bivalve with sort of something on top

 

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pambosk

2) nice looking bivalve with sort of something on top (p2)

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pambosk

3) nice geological marks (i think) on a fragmented bivalve

 

 

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abyssunder

My thought is that they might be gryphaeid oysters, possible Pycnodonte .

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pambosk
1 minute ago, abyssunder said:

My thought is that they might be gryphaeid oysters, possible Pycnodonte .

 

that is my guess for no 1 and 3 Pycnodonte vesicularis more specifically.

 

what about no2?

 

 

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abyssunder

No. 2 - Pycnodonte valve with encrusters, which I think might be barnacle fragments and scars. Similar picture could be the below one from here, although the encrusting creatures were not specified there.

 

IMG_1259.JPG.85087c6797750d1cc4772cfcbfe5f35e.thumb.JPG.b98744bec52a5db6466caf95634288fb.JPGpycnodonte-biauriculata-saint-gemme-17.jpg.385cc44814a351a758bbaf13590329a3.jpg

 

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WhodamanHD

I have no help to offer, but they are cool fossils! I had no idea Cyprus had fossils apart from the Elephantids, you learn something every day!

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pambosk

Dear Abyssander Pycnodonte auriculata, is a possibility. 
 

Dear Whodaman, here had lived and gone also pygmy hippos, deers, sharks, many fish. well one can only begin to imagine what other creatures and life roamed this piece of earth before and after it emerged from the sea. I strongly believe there are many undiscovered species to be discovered and literally only a handful of amateur paleontologists..
Someone should fund an expedition, the government won't and most cases are ignored by the media here. Still that big book of  world 1st fossil discoveries that dates back to what.. 16th century?, has many gaps regarding this area 

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pambosk

on with the show..  4) oysters 6cm and 4cm, i found about 12 similar to the couple below and many fragments:

Many color variations of orange, brown, dark green, beige and some that are dressed with calcite crystals. 

 

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pambosk

5) a biggy one (oyster evidently) out-in and then smoar oysters all bigger than 4cm :P

 

 

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Kane

The problem is that you have such a complicated geology! But we've already provided you with a geologic map.That has to help. :) 

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pambosk

5) a biggy one (oyster evidently) out-in and then smoar oysters all bigger than 4cm (part 2)

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pambosk
4 minutes ago, Kane said:

The problem is that you have such a complicated geology! But we've already provided you with a geologic map.That has to help. :) 

 

yes you could say the whole island is a 'breccia of eras' hehe feels like a playground as you can explore many eras in such a small driving time, and surely the map helps, when the cold comes and the snakes and wasps hush, I will perhaps present something more than marine life :)

Actually, you have provided me with everything I know so far, and I cant thank you enough, I am intending to learn so much more here heheh. 

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Coco

Hi,

 

7 hours ago, pambosk said:

3) nice geological marks (i think) on a fragmented bivalve

I think that they are the tracks of the support on which the oyster grew up.

 

Coco

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pambosk

ok same location

6) those are covered with crystals, i think calcite. one of them is surely an oyster piece.. what about the others? sponges? corals? a couple of those were connected to a bigger structure, and by mistake i cut them of it like fruit.

 

6a

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abyssunder

The other specimens (like the one below) look like Rhodoliths , and I think that might they be.

 

IMG_1344.JPG.b7b169fc20f95a4c2b9bd5c3204de9f2.thumb.JPG.53cf9603410eebba63997db702dee9ad.JPGSCMS39_Lang_12.thumb.jpg.99a883a8d42b409767e940e1ff6b29b9.jpg

excerpt from here

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Plantguy

Hi Coco, home all is well!..Looks like Lori and the others have got ID's for the oysters/pelecypods and possible algae. I was also struck by those ridges in the earlier photo that you commented on and upon closer inspection I noticed some other interesting circular structures. What do you think caused them? Could that be some echinoid trace or some other pelecypod ornamentation? I've not heard of oysters growing on echinoids but I suppose thats possible. Any other ideas? 

 

Regards, Chris 

 

On 9/2/2017 at 3:33 AM, Coco said:

Hi,

 

I think that they are the tracks of the support on which the oyster grew up.

 

Coco

59bda1a3be64b_Plioceneoystermarks.thumb.jpg.71d03b731cedd2a52c10e8fa5013351b.jpg

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Coco

Hi,

 

Good observation Chris ! I didn' t see that.

 

The round forms could be the imprints of the tubers of a sea urchin ; the low part could be tracks of ambulacre, but both sets aren't in the right direction...

 

Have a look here on my file, on the top of the pic n° 10 : http://www.sciences-de-la-terre.com/Glossaire-echinodermes.php#T

one ambulacre is surrounded of pink, underneath it is the tubers which are surrounded in pink. Tubers and ambulacra are vertically aligned and not perpendicularly...

 

Coco

 

 

Edited : I have forgotten the link...

 

 

 

 

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Plantguy
18 hours ago, Coco said:

Hi,

 

Good observation Chris ! I didn' t see that.

 

The round forms could be the imprints of the tubers of a sea urchin ; the low part could be tracks of ambulacre, but both sets aren't in the right direction...

 

Have a look here on my file, on the top of the pic n° 10 : http://www.sciences-de-la-terre.com/Glossaire-echinodermes.php#T

one ambulacre is surrounded of pink, underneath it is the tubers which are surrounded in pink. Tubers and ambulacra are vertically aligned and not perpendicularly...

 

Coco

 

 

Edited : I have forgotten the link...

 

 

 

 

Hi Coco, what a wonderful reference site-thanks! Understand the alignment issues..maybe fragments of several diff pieces or I suppose maybe the lower ridges are part of a pelecypod hinge. May never know due to their fragmentary nature.

 

Pambosk, neat specimens with some extra stuff to think about! Thanks for showing us. 

 

Regards, Chris 

 

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Pedernales78

Here is an oyster I found on the Dry Frio River near Uvalde, Texas.  At least I think it's an oyster anyway.  Here's a pic.IMG_3418.thumb.JPG.d72f7c1f6cea1ad4406e1f0e3db997d5.JPG

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Kane
4 minutes ago, Pedernales78 said:

Here is an oyster I found on the Dry Frio River near Uvalde, Texas.  At least I think it's an oyster anyway.  Here's a pic.IMG_3418.thumb.JPG.d72f7c1f6cea1ad4406e1f0e3db997d5.JPG

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Please start a new fossil ID thread. ;)

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FossilDAWG

Often oysters will start out life cemented to an object such as a shell; later when the oyster is larger it may break away from the original attachment or the object may disintegrate, leaving an impression as an attachment scar on the oyster.  I am confident that your oyster that shows "geological marks" was attached to a piece of echinoid test, as Coco suggested.  You can see the impression of part of an ambulacrum as well as attachment points for the spines, though (as has been noted) the orientation of the two sets of marks seems unusual.

 

Here is a link to an article about a different oyster, Exogyra costata, with an attachment scar that was identified as a lobster, Linuparus.

 

By the way I agree that most of your oysters seem to be Pynodonte vesicularis or something very close to that.  This oyster was very widespread in the Late Cretaceous.

 

Don

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