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Monica

Hungry Hollow, September 2nd, 2017

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Monica

Hello everyone!

 

Yesterday, Viola and I were able to visit Hungry Hollow (near Arkona, Ontario), and we had a wonderful time!  When we last visited the site back in April, it was cold and cloudy; yesterday, it was hot and sunny, and there were no bugs to bother us, so we were in the South Pit collecting fossils the entire time (about 3.5 hours).  Unfortunately I didn't take many pictures, but I blame that on all of the fossils that were calling to me - they wouldn't let me take a break to take pictures! :P  In all seriousness, though, it was a fantastic day out with my little girl - please enjoy the pictures I do have to share with you. :)  Oh, and for those of you that aren't familiar with the rocks at Hungry Hollow - they are Mid-Devonian.

 

Picture #1: Viola just before we headed into the South Pit

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Picture #2: Viola searching for brachiopods (as usual!)

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Picture #3: a spiny brachiopod - does anyone know its identity? @Kane

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Picture #4: a couple of "mommy and baby" Mucrospirifer thedfordensis (I think!) brachiopods - Bob O'Donnell found and gave the one on the right to Viola, while I found and am going to keep the one on the left so we each have one to remember our times together fossil-hunting :)

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Picture #5: a gastropod - Platyceras sp. - does anyone know the species name?

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Picture #6: I found my own Tornoceras sp. - hooray!!!  Back in April, Bob found one and gave it to Viola, and I have to admit that I was a little envious because they're so pretty.  Well, yesterday I found this specimen, and it's a really pretty shade of purple - I'm in love :wub:  (Is the species name arkonense, by the way?)

DSCN2201.thumb.JPG.ef15771f0450303330aefaaf97144375.JPG

 

Picture #7: A coral with an epibiont on top of it - someone yesterday (I believe his name was Darren - he also gave Viola a bottle of water while we were in the pit - a very nice guy!) told me what it is, but I can't recall what he said.  Any ideas?

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Picture #8: This is probably my favourite hash plate that I found yesterday because there is so much going on - bryozoans, corals, and crinoids - oh my!  And perhaps a bit of a trilobite peeking out near the top...?

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Well that's all for now.  I'll likely add more photos after we wash Viola's finds and look through all of our fossils more carefully.  Thanks for reading!

 

Monica

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doushantuo

You 're welcome:dinosmile::dinothumb::D.

Monica,kudo's for the journalism,the pictorial side of it is nigh professional.

Great,great,finds!!!

edit:except for that hideous goniatite:ninja:;)

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Ludwigia

Hi Monica,

Nice little report. Looks like you both had a good time and also some good company. You are right, its a Tornoceras arkonense. Nice one! Also your Platyceras probably goes by the name of arkonense. Nice to see the roots of the spines on it too. Your spiny brachiopod could be a Spinatrypa spinosa.

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crinus

The spiny platycerids now go by the name Spiniplatyceras arkonensis.  The guys name was probably Darrel. He is there quite a bit.  The stuff encrusting the coral is probably Hederella.

Joe

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Kane

Well done! Roger beat me to the IDs. Finding a Spinatrypa with the spines intact is quite the find.

 

The Platyceras is indeed an arkonensis. There is a second prominent Platy in that layer, P. conicum that looks more like crushed cone.

 

EDIT: I think Joe has a much more recent ID for the platyceras (I'm still drawing on the Stumm and Wright stuff :P ). 

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WhodamanHD

Nice haul, especially the nautiloid!

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FossilDAWG

I think the coral encrusting the favositid coral in photo 7 is an Aulopora.  Hederella is a much more delicate branching bryozoan that is often found encrusting brachiopods and the epitheca of solitary rugosans at Hungry Hollow.  However the surface of colonial corals is too coarse, or at any rate I have never seen Hederella on tabulate corals.

 

Don C

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Malcolmt

Looks like you had a great time. One of these days I'll get back there....

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Seaforth

Nice.

 

Nothing beats hunting fossils with your little ones.

Do so myself from time to time and its a great learning experience

 

Pat

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Ludwigia
5 hours ago, crinus said:

The spiny platycerids now go by the name Spiniplatyceras arkonensis. 

Joe

Is Spiniplatyceras a subgenus of Platyceras or a genus in its own right now?

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middevonian

Hi Monica,

 

It's the "very nice guy!". It was nice meeting both of you Saturday! I'll leave my two cents below...

 

- Picture #3" is the productid brachiopod, Devonalosia wrightorum (Muir-Wood & Cooper, 1960).

- Picture #5 is the platyceratid gastropod, Spiniplatyceras arkonense (Blodgett & Frýda, 1999).

- Picture #7 appears to be an auloporid encrusting a favositid; both are tabulate corals.

 

Best,

Darrell

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Ludwigia
1 hour ago, middevonian said:

Hi Monica,

 

It's the "very nice guy!". It was nice meeting both of you Saturday! I'll leave my two cents below...

 

- Picture #3" is the productid brachiopod, Devonalosia wrightorum (Muir-Wood & Cooper, 1960).

 

Best,

Darrell

I stand corrected from a very nice guy :)

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ynot

Nice finds, glad You and Viola had a good hunt, and shared it with Us.

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Malcolmt

Darrell would know he spends more time than most of us there... 

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Fossil-Hound

Very nice ammonite.

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crinus
On 9/3/2017 at 1:55 PM, FossilDAWG said:

I think the coral encrusting the favositid coral in photo 7 is an Aulopora.  Hederella is a much more delicate branching bryozoan that is often found encrusting brachiopods and the epitheca of solitary rugosans at Hungry Hollow.  However the surface of colonial corals is too coarse, or at any rate I have never seen Hederella on tabulate corals.

 

Don C

No you are correct.  I was thinking Aulopora but typed Hederella.

 

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Monica
16 hours ago, middevonian said:

Hi Monica,

 

It's the "very nice guy!". It was nice meeting both of you Saturday! I'll leave my two cents below...

 

- Picture #3" is the productid brachiopod, Devonalosia wrightorum (Muir-Wood & Cooper, 1960).

- Picture #5 is the platyceratid gastropod, Spiniplatyceras arkonense (Blodgett & Frýda, 1999).

- Picture #7 appears to be an auloporid encrusting a favositid; both are tabulate corals.

 

Best,

Darrell

 

Hi Darrell!

 

It's nice to meet you - again! :P  Thanks again for spending some time with me and Viola on Saturday, and thanks as well for the identifications above - hopefully we'll see you in the pit the next time we visit Hungry Hollow (which might be in October because Bob said that he's going to try to organize something then - hopefully we'll be able to make it out there!).

 

Take care,

Monica

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Monica

Thanks for all of your comments and help with respect to identifying the specimens above - I really appreciate it!

 

What follows below are some pictures of items that are from Hungry Hollow, and I'm hoping to find out their genera and, if possible, their species names - thanks in advance for your help!

 

Picture #9: A very common brachiopod (in the South Pit, at least!).  I think that the rock on the left might have two different brachs on it, but I'm not sure...

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Picture #10: a crinoid calyx (Bob found this one)

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Picture #11: some fish armour (again, Bob found these)

DSCN2188.JPG.cc9f2cf390cff25755eb45b8f6305690.JPG

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Kane

I keep forgetting the name of those brachs! They are like mini-Chonetes (but I'm pretty sure that's not the name that is on the tip of my tongue!). Devonochonetes?

 

Nice calyx! Pretty hard for me to tell, so I defer to the HH crinoid experts.

 

What you have on the bottom are fish plates. Those are always a bit fun and exciting. :) I have quite a few that I can't seem to get identified.

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Monica

Oh - I almost forgot - does anyone know which formation/member all of these fossils are from?  Or should I just label them as coming from the South Pit of Hungry Hollow?

 

Thanks once again!

 

Monica

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middevonian

Hi Monica,

 

- Picture #9 are the chonetid brachiopods, Devonochonetes scitulus (Muir-Wood, 1962).

- Picture #10 is the camerate crinoid Arthroacantha.

- Picture #11 are placoderm armour.

 

Best,

Darrell

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Kane

Arkona Fm is the mud shale.

Widder fm has the Hungry Hollow Member with the Widder shale on top. In the south pit, it will mostly be HH Mbr if it isn't from the Arkona mud shale. Your Torno, for example, would be Arkona. 

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middevonian
7 hours ago, Malcolmt said:

Darrell would know he spends more time than most of us there... 

 

Thanks, Malcolm! I had the fortune of meeting Mike and John Topor collecting a few years ago. Their friendship and mentorship has been profound.

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middevonian
1 hour ago, Monica said:

Oh - I almost forgot - does anyone know which formation/member all of these fossils are from?  Or should I just label them as coming from the South Pit of Hungry Hollow?

 

Thanks once again!

 

Monica

 

Hi Monica,

 

I personally catalogue specimens as found (e.g. in situ, weathering out, talus etc.). I'll attach a pdf showing the divisions in local strata and how they correlate between previous and more recent work.

 

Best,

Darrell

 

stratigraphy_correlation.pdf

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Malcolmt

I have also had the good fortune to meet the Topor's there. I also met you quite a number of years ago there. You where up at the top level of the North pit excavating a ledge that you were finding stuff in

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