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Ifoundthiswhatisit

Is this a trilobite mold?

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Ifoundthiswhatisit

Howdy. 

Found this in Central NJ. Is this a real fossil? Anyone know the type? 

Thanks

IMG_2257.JPG

IMG_2256.JPG

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Darko

Yeah,it looks like it is...That's my opinion :D

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bjkibz

Did you find this in place / in a brook or was this something you bought? Matrix looks wrong to me, but I could be mistaken. Mold does look like a trilobite, but that isn't my primary area.

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Douvilleiceras

I would like to respectfully disagree - I do not believe this is a trilobite as it has far too many segments. Although some trilobites of the Superfamily Emuelloidea (Order Redlichiida, Suborder Redlichiina) have a opistothorax that can have up to 100+ segments, the size of this piece would suggest that it does not represent a partial example of this type, and therefore is not of the class Trilobita.

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Fossildude19

This looks like imprinted slag, to me. :unsure: 

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Sagebrush Steve
34 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

This looks like imprinted slag, to me. :unsure: 

I agree.  There is even a round hole that looks like the remnant of a bubble in the upper right area.  While it is reminiscent of a trilobite it doesn't show the three lobes from which trilobites get their name.  You might check to see if it is attracted to a magnet, which would be consistent with slag.  Nice quarter, by the way, or is that a half dollar? It has certainly been around the block a few times!

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doushantuo

If anything,it kinda resembles a trace fossil like Rusophycus.

I have no experience with slag and its various incarnations/morphologies,so/but I'm inclined to believe the both of you.

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Innocentx

It looks metallic. I did image search for "imprinted slag" and the first example is similar to yours though not shiny.

IMG_9656.jpg

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Innocentx

@doushantuo. I see that, too.

Rusophycus.jpg

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westcoast

+ 1 vote for man made. Doesn't look like trilobite or rusophycus. 

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Ifoundthiswhatisit
3 hours ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

I agree.  There is even a round hole that looks like the remnant of a bubble in the upper right area.  While it is reminiscent of a trilobite it doesn't show the three lobes from which trilobites get their name.  You might check to see if it is attracted to a magnet, which would be consistent with slag.  Nice quarter, by the way, or is that a half dollar? It has certainly been around the block a few times!

Thanks. No, it's not magnetic. I'm sure it's rock, not slag. It's possible someone made it if it's fake, but I don't know why they'd have buried it. 

The coin is a silver half dollar from 1934, but I think someone used it as a rubbing coin or it had a lot of time in circulation. It's insanely smooth. It's a good flipping coin. 

 

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ynot
6 hours ago, Ifoundthiswhatisit said:

The coin is a silver half dollar from 1934, but I think someone used it as a rubbing coin or it had a lot of time in circulation. It's insanely smooth. It's a good flipping coin. 

But it makes a lousy scale as to few know what size it is.

 

Slag is a byproduct of refining metals, and is seldom magnetic.

I agree that Your piece looks like slag.

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Macrophyseter

Pretty positive on the slag part too. Also, like ynot said, try to use a modern coin or ruler rather than a relic, as not many people know how big they are.

 

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Ifoundthiswhatisit

OK, sorry guys I figured it was well known coin. My bad! 

 

Sucks that it's probably a fake, I found it when I was a lil kid and always thought it was cool. It was found near a school, maybe it was a weird project one of the kids made. 

image.jpg

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Innocentx

To say it's "fake" implies something purposeful. If it's an artifact of smelting process, then most likely an impression of burnt wood or charcoal. I took this photo of a burnt stump and in the

center it resembles what you have. 002.thumb.JPG.f0d9665c64513bfc875cf3642f968e96.JPG

 

You said it was buried so did you dig it up or use a metal detector? I would definitely pocket that if I found it.

 

Here is a discussion of this type of thing. A number of interesting theories are put forward.

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Can_anyone_identify_the_imprint_on_this_iron_slag2

 

@Sagebrush Steve, Is all slag necessarily magnetic? @Ifoundthiswhatisit says his piece isn't magnetic.

 

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ynot
23 minutes ago, Innocentx said:

Is all slag necessarily magnetic?

Only iron slag can be magnetic, but it is not always.

Slag from refining other metals is not magnetic.

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Sagebrush Steve
3 hours ago, ynot said:

Only iron slag can be magnetic, but it is not always.

Slag from refining other metals is not magnetic.

Yes, sorry I misspoke earlier.  Slag is all the impurities that get removed from the metal when it is refined.  They typically consist of metal oxides, silicon dioxide, and any fluxes added to help with refining.  Usually not magnetic, and they often look glassy.  Small amounts of residual metal may also be found, but if very much they haven't done a good job of refining.

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ynot
24 minutes ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

Yes, sorry I misspoke earlier.  Slag is all the impurities that get removed from the metal when it is refined.  They typically consist of metal oxides, silicon dioxide, and any fluxes added to help with refining.  Usually not magnetic, and they often look glassy.  Small amounts of residual metal may also be found, but if very much they haven't done a good job of refining.

Don't forget that silica is classified as a metal also. 

(Silicon is a man made rubber / plastic product.)

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Sagebrush Steve
4 hours ago, ynot said:

Don't forget that silica is classified as a metal also. 

(Silicon is a man made rubber / plastic product.)

Almost...  Silicon is a chemical element with atomic number 14.  It is commonly used to make semiconductors and integrated circuits.  Silicone (note the extra "e") is the rubber compound.  Silica is another name for silicon dioxide.  I took college chemistry in an earlier century but I seem to remember the element silicon was classified as a metalloid, which is not quite the same as a metal.  But maybe things have changed since then. ^_^

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ynot
3 minutes ago, Sagebrush Steve said:

Almost...  Silicon is a chemical element with atomic number 14.  It is commonly used to make semiconductors and integrated circuits.  Silicone (note the extra "e") is the rubber compound.  Silica is another name for silicon dioxide.  I took college chemistry in an earlier century but I seem to remember the element silicon was classified as a metalloid, which is not quite the same as a metal.  But maybe things have changed since then. ^_^

Whoops:blush: My bad.

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Sagebrush Steve
10 hours ago, ynot said:

Whoops:blush: My bad.

No problem.  You caught me in a mistake earlier in the thread so now we are even. :)

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