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worthy 55

Shark Tooth

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worthy 55

What kind of shark tooth is this?? :Cave Man:

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Gatorman

Looks like a Galeocerdo cuvier symphyseal tooth if there is such a thing.

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worthy 55

It is one of the teeth I found in Gainesville and it just looks different than any that I have found. :huh: :huh:

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Northern Sharks

Anson has nailed another one. It's a symphyseal from a Tiger shark. I don't know Florida too well, so it could be G. cuvier or possibly G.mayumbensis depending on the age. Cuvier is miocene-present, mayumbensis is oligocene-miocene and much more geographically limited.

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Gatorman

Well I looked and it looks like i could be right :D Yay for me! But before you label it I would wait and see what NS and Harry think. I'm 90% sure its a Galeocerdo cuvier but I'm not so sure about it being a symphyseal, but it looks like one to me.

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Gatorman

Well looks like NS posted while I was :P And he seems to agree with me, I do not have any information on whether or not Galeocerdo mayumbensis Is found in Gainesville creeks. I will do some research.

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Northern Sharks
According to George's site (http://www.afn.org/~afn02877/page3.html) they can be found here along with nearly all the others so I am not sure. What are the defining differences in them?

As I said in my post, G.mayumbensis is older. Some sources say the 2 species (cuvier and mayumbensis) are different, some believe the differences are not enough to separate them. Elasmo.com says that, other than age, mayumbensis teeth have "simpler"serrations. With both species, each large serration is itself serrated, but G.cuvier is more complex. Also the angle of the serrations is different, but this could just be an evolving thing (sorry to use the E word -no arguments now). Go to elasmo.com-Lee Creek-Ground sharks-Galeocerdo mayumbensis and there's a link to an article about G.cuvier lineage.

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worthy 55

Thanks guys! I have picked up alot of teeth from that creek but this the first of this kind. Are they kinda rare? :huh: :huh:WOW I just looked at it close and the serrations are serrated too cool!

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Gatorman

Symphyseal teeth from any shark are fairly rare, about as rare as posteriors, there just isn't as many of them. Any Tiger's found in Gainesville creeks are not that common either, the majority of tigers are Galeocerdo aduncus.

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worthy 55

I find a few tigers every time I go! :Thumbs-up:

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Northern Sharks
Symphyseal teeth from any shark are fairly rare, about as rare as posteriors, there just isn't as many of them. Any Tiger's found in Gainesville creeks are not that common either, the majority of tigers are Galeocerdo aduncus.

Tiger shark uppers and lowers look pretty much the same. I have a modern jaw and I count 10 rows on the bottom and 9 rows on the top per side of very similar looking teeth. This doesn't include the tiny posteriors. That's 38 rows of teeth that look alike, but with varying sizes. There is only 1 symphyseal row on the top and bottom which can curve either left or right. Just by these numbers, only 5% of teeth found would be symphyseal, but I think the number is considerably smaller than that.

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