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dmax

Mammoth Tooth?

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dmax

Can anyone help confirm this for me. I was told that what I found was a mammoth tooth but my follow up research makes me believe it could be something else... just not sure what.

I found it off the GA coast in dredge spoils

Thanks

Dmax

post-240-1202304221_thumb.jpg post-240-1202304471_thumb.jpg post-240-1202304535_thumb.jpg post-240-1202304569_thumb.jpg

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Xiphactinus

It's a mastodon tooth -- very worn down, so it was from an old individual. Nice find!

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PrehistoricFlorida

Looks like a Gomphotherium to me.

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MOROPUS

I agree with auriculatus.It looks very much to a very worn Gomphotherium Angustidens to me.It was a four tusk mastodon, that lived in the Miocene, and spread around North America, Europe, Asia and Africa.Good catch! That`s a rare one! :Thumbs-up:

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worthy 55

I would have to say a Gomph too. Nice find! :Thumbs-up:

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Harry Pristis
I agree with auriculatus.It looks very much to a very worn Gomphotherium Angustidens to me.It was a four tusk mastodon, that lived in the Miocene, and spread around North America, Europe, Asia and Africa.Good catch! That`s a rare one! :Thumbs-up:

I've never heard of Gomphotherium angustidens, Moropus. It may be know by a synonym in the USA, but it must be rare. The common Gomphothere here, from California to Florida (and Georgia and South Carolina) is Cuvieronius sp. This senile example is so worn, that any species identification is nigh on to impossible.

------Harry Pristis

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MOROPUS
I've never heard of Gomphotherium angustidens, Moropus. It may be know by a synonym in the USA, but it must be rare. The common Gomphothere here, from California to Florida (and Georgia and South Carolina) is Cuvieronius sp. This senile example is so worn, that any species identification is nigh on to impossible.

------Harry Pristis

Well, it was only an approaching! Perhaps, as you say, could be the synonymous of Cuvieronius for the States; my only references are European books, and the commonly seen specimen here is Gomphoterium Angustidens!

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Harry Pristis
Well, it was only an approaching! Perhaps, as you say, could be the synonymous of Cuvieronius for the States; my only references are European books, and the commonly seen specimen here is Gomphoterium Angustidens!

I don't think that Gomphotherium angustidens occurs in the Americas. G. angustidens was a Eurasian-African species. About ten genera of mastodonts are recognized from the Miocene of Eurasia and Africa, according to one book.

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MOROPUS
I don't think that Gomphotherium angustidens occurs in the Americas. G. angustidens was a Eurasian-African species. About ten genera of mastodonts are recognized from the Miocene of Eurasia and Africa, according to one book.

Perhaps you are right! Sorry about it, but it looked so much to that one! In one of my books is said that "this specimen is widespread across northern Hemisphere"; but in other books, only says in Eurasia and Africa.Meanwhile, I was looking in my "definitive guide book" (is the one I mostly look for rare ones), for it, and I found that in Spain are record 3 types of Gomphotheriidae: Gomphoterium Angustidens (First Miocene-Middle Pliocene), Anancus Arvernensis (Late Pliocene-Pleistocene), and Tetralophodon Longirostris (Middle miocene-Upper Miocene).

Nevertheless, thanks for the correction!

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darren

Gomphotherium And I'd be hitting those spoil islands again.

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