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UtahFossilHunter

Polishing Some "Chunkasaurus"

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UtahFossilHunter

I had to listen to a couple lectures for a school assignment which ended up totaling over 2 hours of straight listening. I cannot just sit and do nothing while I listen so I decided to do a little fossil prep. I have had this piece of what is commonly called "chunkosaurus". Chunkosaurus is a chunk of dinosaur bone that has no defining features and many times doesn't have a location attached to said specimen for us to assign it to a species or genus and so is almost practically useless to scientific endeavors. But I saw a future for this little piece so I downloaded my lectures into my phone and grabbed my stack of various sandpaper grits. I started FullSizeRender.thumb.jpg.1923ca10880ccc55983c87d9c286a644.jpgwith the opposite side looking like this.

 

First up was some 380 grit paper to get rid of the obvious saw marks the seller I bought it from had left. Here is right after I got done with the 380 paper.IMG_1642.thumb.JPG.b5ad992fd33941b939ad553ef8b729e9.JPG

Most of the saw marks except for the absolute deepest ones were gone and a little shine was showing up. I then moved onto a intermediate grit around 500 I can't tell for sure as it was old and faded on the back but I could tell the approximate grit from feeling it. This paper promptly fell apart but I got the results out of it I wanted.

I then moved up to a 1200 grit then 1500 and finally 2000. I forgot to take pictures as I was getting excited to see it start to gain a mirror finish:P

My lectures had drawn to a close so here is my final product. Please forgive my photography, my camera is acting wonky.FullSizeRender.thumb.jpg.21427f7422fbfbce26d7bfc68f6d4082.jpg

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UtahFossilHunter

Two more pictures. Not bad for just some hand sanding.:ighappy: Nickel for scale.IMG_1657.thumb.JPG.a1c16ed629acfba094aeb58fee65f973.JPGIMG_1658.thumb.JPG.fea26264e0ee28d1b04196579df12400.JPG 

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ynot

Neat way to listen to a lecture.

Nice bone piece.

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UtahFossilHunter
50 minutes ago, ynot said:

Neat way to listen to a lecture.

Nice bone piece.

It was the perfect activity as I could focus on what they were saying but keep my hands busy and thanks! It had the most character out of their selection.

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FossilDudeCO

Not a bad looking bone now!

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WhodamanHD

I would never have the patients to listen to a long uninteresting lecture, or grind away at a chunkosaurus, so both would be mind boggling for me! Turned out real nice, thanks for sharing!

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UtahFossilHunter
1 hour ago, FossilDudeCO said:

Not a bad looking bone now!

Nope, it's quite pretty now.

1 hour ago, WhodamanHD said:

I would never have the patients to listen to a long uninteresting lecture, or grind away at a chunkosaurus, so both would be mind boggling for me! Turned out real nice, thanks for sharing!

It was definitely mentally draining to listen for so long but I ended up with a nice piece to show off and sore arms. :ighappy:

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UtahFossilHunter

Here are some close up pics of it. 

IMG_1663.JPG

IMG_1665.JPG

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Ptychodus04

Very nice. I know some jewelers who would love it. What were the lectures covering? :D

 

If you want to achieve a "smooth as glass" surface, you can drop some cyanoacrylate into the voids during your intermediate phase. I have had great success with it taking a polish and use it to fill even large gaps in baculites and belemnites that I have polished.

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UtahFossilHunter
9 hours ago, Ptychodus04 said:

Very nice. I know some jewelers who would love it. What were the lectures covering? :D

 

If you want to achieve a "smooth as glass" surface, you can drop some cyanoacrylate into the voids during your intermediate phase. I have had great success with it taking a polish and use it to fill even large gaps in baculites and belemnites that I have polished.

It was nothing related to fossils, I can tell you that! :PJust some general health lectures.

That's a good idea, I will probably do that sometime in the future.:ighappy: Do you fill it then sand it just like if you were doing the fossil by itself?

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ynot

I would get some sandpaper that is a little courser than 360  (maybe 120 or 220) and start over to get rid of the saw marks. The stone will look better that way.

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Ptychodus04
9 hours ago, UtahFossilHunter said:

That's a good idea, I will probably do that sometime in the future.:ighappy: Do you fill it then sand it just like if you were doing the fossil by itself?

 

I start with 220 grit to remove major imperfections. After this sanding, I add the glue. I add in stages, allowing for the glue to set until it has completely filled the voids and is protruding from the freshly sanded surface. Then, I let it sit overnight. Even though it is super glue, and sets rather fast, I find it to be a little soft for a while. The next day, I hit the glue with 220 to bring it down to flush with the fossil. Then, I move to 360-400 wet sanding. after the 220 scratches are gone. I move to 500-600 wet sanding. After the fine sanding, I go to the grinder. On the buffing wheel, I use jeweler's rouge to polish. The glue takes a good polish but you have to be careful not to heat it up with the wheel.

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UtahFossilHunter
12 hours ago, Ptychodus04 said:

 

I start with 220 grit to remove major imperfections. After this sanding, I add the glue. I add in stages, allowing for the glue to set until it has completely filled the voids and is protruding from the freshly sanded surface. Then, I let it sit overnight. Even though it is super glue, and sets rather fast, I find it to be a little soft for a while. The next day, I hit the glue with 220 to bring it down to flush with the fossil. Then, I move to 360-400 wet sanding. after the 220 scratches are gone. I move to 500-600 wet sanding. After the fine sanding, I go to the grinder. On the buffing wheel, I use jeweler's rouge to polish. The glue takes a good polish but you have to be careful not to heat it up with the wheel.

When I get around to doing the backside, I'll have to use this method.:D

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