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‘Coy Boy

Need help identifying shark tooth

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‘Coy Boy

Hello folks. I bought this tooth about 10 years ago from a seller in Georgia. He had no clue as to what shark it came from. I just recently made a necklace out of it and felt like I should know what species it’s from. It also appears to be very old. Anyone have a clue? Very much appreciated!

FA0B2BE9-E630-46ED-AF3E-9F746BF74BA1.jpeg

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Macrophyseter

Welcome to the forum! It looks like a broad-tooth mako tooth (Cosmopolitodus/Carcharodon hastalis, it is actually more related to great whites than makos despite its common name). The necklace is also quite lovely. :wub: Nice buy!

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WhodamanHD

Welcome to the forum! I agree with hastilis, and it is very old indeed, a few million years most likely.

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‘Coy Boy

Thank you! That was one of my assumptions from scouring the net. I know the color is due to sediment, but at a glance, what do you think the age of the fossil is, roughly?

Just read your reply Whodaman. Thank you so much!

Edited by ‘Coy Boy

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Macrophyseter

I'm guessing that the seller from Georgia probably found it there. C. hatalis existed from the Eocene right to the Pleistocene Ice Age, but around the Miocene was its "Golden Age", and teeth outside this period are rare. Based on the assumed location, I think that the tooth is from the Miocene.

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WhodamanHD
1 minute ago, Macrophyseter said:

I'm guessing that the seller from Georgia probably found it there. C. hatalis existed from the Eocene right to the Pleistocene Ice Age, but around the Miocene was its "Golden Age", and teeth outside this period are rare. Based on the assumed location, I think that the tooth is from the Miocene.

Was I'm thought as well, I just like to be general when I know there are other possibilities.

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sixgill pete
1 hour ago, Macrophyseter said:

I'm guessing that the seller from Georgia probably found it there. C. hatalis existed from the Eocene right to the Pleistocene Ice Age, but around the Miocene was its "Golden Age", and teeth outside this period are rare. Based on the assumed location, I think that the tooth is from the Miocene.

 

C. hastalis was a Miocene / early Pliocene species. Not Eocene or Pleistocene. 

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Macrophyseter
1 hour ago, sixgill pete said:

C. hastalis was a Miocene / early Pliocene species. Not Eocene or Pleistocene. 

Alight. :dinothumb:

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