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Shamalama

Another Eldredgeops iowensis southworthi trilobite found at Arkona!

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Malcolmt

Wow..... definately wish this one was mine......... better than any of my finds on our mega fossil 3 day adventure...

 

Great find.... awesome specimen... makes me actually think about giving the south pit a try next time I go.......

 

Great photos much better than I get with my Samsung 6

 

For those interested it was prepped with sub 40 micron re-sieved dolomite (I made Shamalama sieve some media while I was prepping) using a COMCO abrasion unit and .015 and .010 nozzles with a .025 tank orifice. Only a few seconds of scribe work with a German Pferd MST 31 was used to remove a couple of sticky adhesion's near the very end of the prep that were resistive to low PSI abrasion. Prep time about 1 hour 45 minutes. Shamalama can now attest that I work in a crampt little laundry room that my wife relegates me too.

 

Invertebrate fossil of the month is going to be a super tough one this month.........

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RJB

Right eye problem or not, thats one neat lookin bug!

 

RB

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Shamalama
40 minutes ago, Malcolmt said:

Great photos much better than I get with my Samsung 6

 

I used my Canon Powershot IS S3 camera for those shots. Does pretty well for macro shots.

27 minutes ago, RJB said:

Right eye problem or not, thats one neat lookin bug!

 

RB

Thanks! It reminds me a little of a Drotops megalomanicus from Morocco but those are lower Devonian in age and much larger.

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ynot

Very nice find, congratulations.

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doushantuo

hot dee ay enn gee!!

Nifty!

Phacops iowaensis????

edit:so awrite,I haven't got Delo:D

56ghb.jpg

rips.jpg

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Kane

That's a gem of a find! Did you pluck that from the benches, or was it just maddeningly lying around, weathered out, just waiting for you to come and pick it up? :D 

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Carl

Exquisite!!!!

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crinus

Mr Shamalama,

 

Did you doubt that I was correct on the pygidium?  I knew it was there.  The cephalon and thorax were there so there was no doubt about the pygidium. 

Now aren't you glad I gave you are hard time about you dumping corals on top of this specimen.  I can't imagine what would have happened if you left it in the baggie with the corals. 

This is a beautiful specimen. And yes, I am jealous.  Especially since it was right next to my foot. 

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Fossil-Hound

@Shamalama that's a gorgeous bug. These are not easy to find!

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Shamalama
2 hours ago, Kane said:

That's a gem of a find! Did you pluck that from the benches, or was it just maddeningly lying around, weathered out, just waiting for you to come and pick it up? :D 

 

2 hours ago, crinus said:

Mr Shamalama,

 

Did you doubt that I was correct on the pygidium?  I knew it was there.  The cephalon and thorax were there so there was no doubt about the pygidium. 

Now aren't you glad I gave you are hard time about you dumping corals on top of this specimen.  I can't imagine what would have happened if you left it in the baggie with the corals. 

This is a beautiful specimen. And yes, I am jealous.  Especially since it was right next to my foot. 

 

@Kane, It was sitting in the boot print of Crinus which was just below where he was sitting. He challenged me to find a Trilobite, so I did. :D

 

And I didn't doubt you @crinus , I just thought it was funny how the two of you were arguing.  BTW, thanks for the study piece from Bowmanville too. 

 

2 hours ago, doushantuo said:

hot dee ay enn gee!!

Nifty!

Phacops iowaensis????

edit:so awrite,I haven't got Delo:D

56ghb.jpg

rips.jpg

@doushantuo

Nice, I don't know that I'd ever seen the literature for it. I corrected my spelling too, took out the "a" in Iowa. ;)

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piranha

Sorry to nitpick, but the thread title should be edited.  ALL Middle Devonian "Phacops" from North America are now: Eldredgeops

 

Very nice find! :trilosurprise:

 

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Malcolmt

Scott, you are far more informed on these types of things than most of us. But I thought a few North American phacops were still up in the air.

 

I am aware that in 1990 Struve split Phacops rana from the European type species and erected a new genus Eldredgeops for the Phacops species of eastern North America. I thought Phacops iowensis and Phacops clarksoni were still under consideration as to what genus they belong in.

 

 

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JohnBrewer

That is a great find @Shamalama and the prep @Malcolmt is nothing short of exceptional. 

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GerryK
2 hours ago, piranha said:

Sorry to nitpick, but the thread title should be edited.  ALL Middle Devonian "Phacops" from North America are now: Eldredgeops

 

Very nice find! :trilosurprise:

 

 

53 minutes ago, Malcolmt said:

Scott, you are far more informed on these types of things than most of us. But I thought a few North American phacops were still up in the air.

 

I am aware that in 1990 Struve split Phacops rana from the European type species and erected a new genus Eldredgeops for the Phacops species of eastern North America. I thought Phacops iowensis and Phacops clarksoni were still under consideration as to what genus they belong in.

 

 

@piranha and @Malcolmt

The "iowensis" group of trilobites are neither a Phacops nor Eldredgeops. The "iowensis" group differs from Eldredgeops by having a post ocular area which is absent in Eldredgeops; the subocular pad is present and absent in Eldredgeops; the palpebral area is smaller than Eldredgeops and because there are fewer files in the eye, the palpebral lobe is smaller than in Eldredgeops. The "iowensis" group looks like it belongs to the Tribe Geesopini, but the origin and relation of the "iowensis" group to the Phacopids is uncertain at this time until someone revises the Phacopids of North America.

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Ludwigia
7 hours ago, Shamalama said:

 

Very happy to have found this. It is bigger than the one I found last year too!

 

You lucky guy! Looks like you've got a lot of names to choose from until someone decides what it should be called and all of his colleagues agree with him.

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Kane
4 hours ago, Shamalama said:

 

 

@Kane, It was sitting in the boot print of Crinus which was just below where he was sitting. He challenged me to find a Trilobite, so I did. :D

 

From the sounds of it, the Crinus Bootprint Formation seems very productive. I wonder how many other rare specimens he has trampled. :D Gives an entirely different meaning to "following in another's footsteps." :D 

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FossilDAWG

Speaking as someone who has had that happen to them, sometimes your boot actually exposes a previously covered fossil.  At least, that's my excuse.  Anyway I did the same thing to someone else a few weeks later, picked up a mosasaur tooth I spotted right beside their foot as we were talking.

 

Don

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piranha
2 hours ago, Malcolmt said:

 ...I thought Phacops iowensis and Phacops clarksoni were still under consideration as to what genus they belong in.

 

Regardless if they are under consideration, we still need a name to call them by, right?

 

 

1 hour ago, GerryK said:

...but the origin and relation of the "iowensis" group to the Phacopids is uncertain at this time until someone revises the Phacopids of North America.

 

Until someone makes the revision and publishes, they are currently Eldredgeops iowensis.  Sounds like this revision is right in your wheelhouse!  emo73.gif :o :P

 

 

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Kane
4 minutes ago, piranha said:

 

Regardless if they are under consideration, we still need a name to call them by, right?

 

 

 

I say we settle on "Gladys." Or perhaps, Penelope the Profusely Pustular Phacopid. :P 

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Malcolmt

Great alliteration... I like the name but I doubt it will stand ......

 

 

For our reference here is a link to Gerry's great post previously on the topic Rana versus eldredgeops

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/47202-phacops-vs-eldredgeops/

 

 

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Jeffrey P

Congratulations Dave. The ornamentation on that trilobite is truly impressive. Very nice prep job to display it. 

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Monica

:faint:

 

Congratulations on the amazing find!!!

 

Monica

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Shamalama

Thanks Everyone for the kind comments. 

 

@piranha I have changed the all the offending names to protect the innocent. :P;) 

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FossilDAWG

Any chance we could see the one you found before alongside the new one?

 

Don

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