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darrow

Collected this just now...

DCA7B6C9-7AB7-4808-99B8-8666790B12B8.jpeg

D14A4649-3D3F-4EC6-BD0F-CBCC4179A7DF.jpeg

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Peace river rat
10 minutes ago, darrow said:

Collected this just now...

DCA7B6C9-7AB7-4808-99B8-8666790B12B8.jpeg

D14A4649-3D3F-4EC6-BD0F-CBCC4179A7DF.jpeg

Awesome find! I have a large collection from the peace river (where I often hunt)  Ones of those, still eludes me!  Great find!

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Shellseeker
14 minutes ago, darrow said:

Collected this just now...

 

FANTASTIC FIND :yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1: Congratulations. You must feel on top of the world!.  I love the veins for blood vessels that are clearly differentiated. Please provide other views as you get the time. I am interested in identification.  :popcorn: Which sloths are prevalent in Texas fossil record?

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JarrodB

Wow killer find. Congrats!

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jcbshark

Wow, excellent find.... finally got my first just this past spring :fistbump: it had been on my list a while

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ynot

Sweet find! Congratulations.

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Nimravis

Congrats on the great find

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Uncle Siphuncle

That, sir, is a coveted Texas find.

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Max-fossils

So cool! :o

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black3887

Gorgeous claw core! That is on my bucket list of "once in a lifetime" finds I hope for!

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aplomado

WOW!

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garyc
On 10/28/2017 at 4:25 PM, Shellseeker said:

 

FANTASTIC FIND :yay-smiley-1::yay-smiley-1: Congratulations. You must feel on top of the world!.  I love the veins for blood vessels that are clearly differentiated. Please provide other views as you get the time. I am interested in identification.  :popcorn: Which sloths are prevalent in Texas fossil record?

Yes! Welcome to the club! That looks like a nice one. I think megalonyx jeffersoni is prevalent here. Eremothere may have been around but this claw looks a little small for that beast. 

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Shellseeker
21 hours ago, garyc said:

Yes! Welcome to the club! That looks like a nice one. I think megalonyx jeffersoni is prevalent here. Eremothere may have been around but this claw looks a little small for that beast. 

Thanks for the response.  I have been fighting a virus and slow to respond.  Here is a jeffersoni that I found in Florida. 

Note the complex "attachment" end... On Darrow's find, very different and I was curious about why. Different claw position, different species.... etc

image.png.63368bde0ea85ed3b97a49799ec378a4.png

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darrow

Perhaps not very evident in my original photos but the proximal end of the claw core is damaged...  broken off approximately at the red line below.

I'll take some clear pictures multiple views and post them in the ID section later this week.  In the meantime if anyone can point me to a diagnostic dimensional study that might help identify species or genus I'd appreciate it.  I've not found much beyond terms like " more curved" or "laterally flattened" which aren't really very helpful. 

Darrow

 

Shellseaker it looks like your's in missing the sheath.

Untitled.png.a239bc4023e37d8825bfff9ee7d8f48b.png

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Shellseeker
40 minutes ago, darrow said:

Perhaps not very evident in my original photos but the proximal end of the claw core is damaged...  broken off approximately at the red line below.

I'll take some clear pictures multiple views and post them in the ID section later this week.  In the meantime if anyone can point me to a diagnostic dimensional study that might help identify species or genus I'd appreciate it.  I've not found much beyond terms like " more curved" or "laterally flattened" which aren't really very helpful. 

Darrow

 

Shellseaker it looks like your's in missing the sheath.

 

Darrow,

Thanks for the update,  I have actually seen sloth claws that have less curved proximal ends. Also I have found 5 sloth claws, none of which have any vestige of a sheath.. I have found 3 Jeffersons, 1 Harlan, and 1 very small Megalonyx leptostomus

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ynot
1 hour ago, darrow said:

it looks like your's in missing the sheath.

It is very rare for keratin to fossilize, so no claw sheaths.

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darrow

Yes, of course I wasn't referring to the keratin nail itself...    the "sheath" being the boney pocket at the proximal end that supports the base of the keratin nail or claw and from which the keratin grows in life.   Although from personal experience I'd expect keratin in fact originates from the entire surface claw core including from within the "pocket". 

"In life the bony core would have been covered with a toenail growing out of the pocket or sheath at the wide end." http://slothcentral.com/archives/2505

 

Quote above and illustration below from... Walk Like a Sloth: lessons in ground sloth locomotion by David J. Brenzel   The Tarkio Valley Sloth Project 

 

clawlabels-1024x600.jpg

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darrow

Some quick views of the ventral tuberosity, articular concavities, nutrient foramin, and partial "sheath" with missing section drawn in red.  You can also see where the dorsal process is broken off my example...

 

 

FullSizeRender3.jpg

IMG_2436.JPG

IMG_2433.JPG

IMG_2435.JPG

IMG_2437.JPG

IMG_2438.JPG

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RJB

Very interesting thread.  Nice fossil too!

 

RB

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ynot
On 11/2/2017 at 5:43 AM, darrow said:

  the "sheath" being the boney pocket at the proximal end that supports the base of the keratin nail or claw and from which the keratin grows in life. 

Did not know that, Thanks.

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Stagmooser

Awesome claw core that is a special find indeed - congrats!

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hxmendoza

Fantastic find! Would make for a great Fossil of the Month! Can it still be applied for November even though found so late in October?

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Kane
1 minute ago, hxmendoza said:

Fantastic find! Would make for a great Fossil of the Month! Can it still be applied for November even though found so late in October?

If the majority of the prep is done in the month in which it is entered, it would be eligible. :) 

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Jesuslover340

Sweet find!

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RyanNREMTP

I would love to find one of those, especially for my wife.  She is a zookeeper and have two sloths where she works at. 

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