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Mtneerwv

Need help identifying fossil found in WV?

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Mtneerwv

I found this fossil around 4 years ago in a creek in West Virginia. I'm curious to know if it is possible to determine the time period when this fossil might have formed, the possible creature it might have been, and just more about it in general. 

The fossil is composed of a very deeply embedded scale pattern that is about 2.5 inches in diameter. Only about 1/2 of the fossil is very visible, and the fossil is in a layered black rock. The fossil appears as though it is long, like a snake would have been, but unfortunately I only have a small portion of the original fossil, so it's hard to tell.AA7D6BE5-B06E-44B2-8A06-70ADA28C1852.thumb.jpeg.394aad632110ad36582fa58fe5f8c5d2.jpegB5449FF1-6A04-4D44-B42A-EC589852CC30.thumb.jpeg.d11dbe6ffc33e2157c35ad7d4c6726c8.jpeg 

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated! 

Edited by Mtneerwv

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Adam86cucv

Welcome to the forum.  It might help to have a rough idea of where it was found to help narrow down what formation it is from.  Also a ruler or measuring tape for a scale helps, coins are not as handy since we have quite a few international members. 

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Adam86cucv

I don't think the fossil you have is a snake or an animal either I think it is plant(s). I definitely don't claim to know plant fossils very well but I made the assumption that it is Carboniferous since WV has a lot of coal.  I searched Google images for Carboniferous plant fossils and I think it looks similar to some type clubmoss.  There seems to be different varieties, hopefully someone with more expertise will be able to narrow down yours.

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FossilDAWG

This fossil is a piece of the lycopod plant Lepidodendron.  The triangular scales are structures where the leaves were attached to the stem.

 

Don

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EMP
On 10/30/2017 at 8:30 PM, Mtneerwv said:

I found this fossil around 4 years ago in a creek in West Virginia. I'm curious to know if it is possible to determine the time period when this fossil might have formed, the possible creature it might have been, and just more about it in general. 

The fossil is composed of a very deeply embedded scale pattern that is about 2.5 inches in diameter. Only about 1/2 of the fossil is very visible, and the fossil is in a layered black rock. The fossil appears as though it is long, like a snake would have been, but unfortunately I only have a small portion of the original fossil, so it's hard to tell.AA7D6BE5-B06E-44B2-8A06-70ADA28C1852.thumb.jpeg.394aad632110ad36582fa58fe5f8c5d2.jpegB5449FF1-6A04-4D44-B42A-EC589852CC30.thumb.jpeg.d11dbe6ffc33e2157c35ad7d4c6726c8.jpeg 

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated! 

 

It's hard to make any positive ID on this specimen due to it's poor preservation and small size, but I'd agree with Lepidodendron sp. as an ID. 

 

As for it's age it's very likely mid-late Pennsylvanian, so late Carboniferous. 

 

If I had to make a guess as to the formation I'd go with the Allegheny or Monongahela Group. It would help to know roughly where in WV as the geology of the state is roughly youngest west to east. 

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Reese the Rockhound

I have lots of WV plant fossils, and I'm almost sure that that is Sigillaria, not Lepidodendron.

sigillaria.jpg

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Mark Kmiecik

I agree -- Sigillaria. I can't believe nobody caught this until now. The plant guys must have been asleep! Good catch, Reese.

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