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what is this fossil


Mahogany

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Looks like cone in cone deposit. Or it could be an alge.

Do You have a side view?

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I don't think this is cone-in-cone. Looks quite different. I think it might be a calcitic cave formation. Or less likely, a stromatolite.

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Hello all. Now i think they are calcite precipitations around an rod like fossile. It might reworked on the shore by tide, wind, waves and time by time it get bigger as a snowball around the central fossile body. Tomorrow i'll plan to took side photos for new insights.

 

Edited by Mahogany
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To tell if it is a cave calcite You can take a small piece (from the edge) and crush it. Then put some vinegar on it to see of it fizzes.

 

I agree that it is not cone in cone, I should have looked closer.:blush:

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Was it found in an area with hot springs? It looks like a concretionary structure with concentric growths formed by precipitated mineral like calcium carbonate.

 

Pamukkale-26-757x505.jpg.f25287c786922f4d4b6b0140f376128a.jpg

Pamukkale

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The UO geologist agrees with this assessment:

 

37 minutes ago, piranha said:

 

 

"These are concretions, from episodic cementation, perhaps annual by calcite in groundwater.

These look like the ones from the Cretaceous of Morocco, which I have seen in the field."

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Some travertines can be classified as stromatolites. It would be necessary to identify thin algal or cyanobacterial layers  between the concentric mineral layers.

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I revisited the field, Surprisingly i could't find it. I took more photos of neighbouring rocks/fossiles which are conformable layers these may give new ideas about the deposition environment. 

IMG_2668.thumb.JPG.79dea2965993cbd2095752ca749e0968.JPG

IMG_2661.JPG

Edited by Mahogany
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The region that im currently visiting at the aegen sea coasts of asia minor where these areas, has heat anomaly but this heat anomaly is a recent phenomenon. These rocks are known as miocene. If these peculiarites are related to geothermal activity, the heat anomaly started while these rocks deposited or more recently before uplifting the rocks might be affected by geothermal activity. 

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4 hours ago, Mahogany said:

more photos from the succession rocks

Please upload the pictures directly here as links tend to disappear and some TFF users do not like to follow links to look at the pictures.

Thank You,

Tony

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  • 4 months later...

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