Jump to content
Fossildude19

November 2017 Finds of the Month

Recommended Posts

Fossildude19

As we leave behind autumns' golds, reds, and oranges, and brace for the upcoming winter, we usually give thanks this time of year for a bountiful harvest. 

As fossil collectors, based on the finds so far this year, it has indeed been a bountiful fossil harvest. :) 

Yet, we still have another month  in which to find fossils here in the Northeast USA, while some people are just gearing up for their hunting season in other parts of the country/world. That said, it is time,  once again, to find something amazing, and post it here for all to view on the FOTM Contest. 

 

 

***********************************

 

Remember...PLEASE carefully read the rules below, ... make sure you include all the required information, and submit your fossil! 

If you have a question about a possible entry, please send me a PM. 

Please pay special attention to Rule #5: Before and After Preparation photos must be submitted for Prepped specimens not found during the Month of the Contest. In addition to keeping the contest fair, this new qualification will encourage better documentation of our spectacular past finds. Best of success to all, and good hunting!

Entries will be taken until midnight on November 30th.

 

 Please let us know if you have any questions, and thanks for sharing more of your fossils and research this month.

To view the Winning Fossils from past contests visit the Find Of The Month Winner's Gallery.


***********************************

Rules for The Fossil Forum's Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month Contests

1. You find a great Vertebrate Fossil or Invertebrate/Plant Fossil! Only fossils found by you. NO PURCHASED FOSSILS.

2. Post your entry in the Find of the Month topic. Use a separate post for each entry. (Only two entries per contest category.)

3. Your Fossil must have been found during the Month of the Contest, or most of the significant Preparation of your Fossil must have been completed during the Month of the Contest.

4. You must include the Date of your Discovery (when found in the contest month); or the Date of Preparation Completion and Discovery date (if not found in the contest month).

5. Before and After Preparation photos must be submitted for prepped specimens not found during the Month of the Contest.

6. You must include the common or scientific name.

7. You must include the Geologic Age or Geologic Formation where the Fossil was found.

8. You must include the State, Province, or region where the Fossil was found.

9. Play fair and honest. No bought fossils. No false claims.

Shortly after the end of the Month, separate Polls will be created for the Vertebrate and Invertebrate/Plant Find of the Month.

 

In addition to the fun of a contest, we also want to learn more about the fossils. 

So, only entries posted with a CLEAR photo and that meet the other guidelines will be placed into the Poll. 


*******Please use the following format for the required information:*******

 

Date of discovery

Scientific or Common name

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation

State, Province, or Region found

Photos (if prepped, before and after photos, please.)

 

Photos of the winning specimens may be posted to TFF's Facebook page.

Once the Contest Submission period has ended, after all the votes are tallied, and the Polls for both categories are closed, we will know the two winning Finds of the Month for NOVEMBER - 2017 !  

 

Now, go find your fossil, do your research, and make an entry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
belemniten

I again want to participate this month with a Temnodontosaurus tooth from Holzmaden.

The tooth is about 2 cm long (2.2 cm) and 1 cm wide, so its one of my biggest tooth I have ever found.

Temnodontosaurus is a large Ichthyosaur, which mainly hunted ammonites.

In the "Schlacke" (a specific layer) you can sometimes find smaller teeth but such big teeth in a good condition are very rare.

Because of that I am really happy about this find !
 
Date of discovery: November 5th, 2017, the prep work took about 4 hours.
Scientific or Common name: Temnodontosaurus tooth
Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Lower Jurassic, "Schlacke"
State, Province, or Region found: Germany, Holzmaden, quarry Kromer

 

IMG_0137.thumb.JPG.69f9d9b8807545e732fc6302dd99fdbf.JPG

 

IMG_0141.thumb.JPG.114a60ce3a16eef32fef55db9688aa1c.JPG

 

IMG_0171.thumb.JPG.ce9a6c15e05b34c43be2070b4d7a282a.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ludwigia

:blink: Thus far, I'd say that you've both won here. I refuse to choose just one of them :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kasia

Hi, 

I'm new to the forum and I would like to participate in the contest with the Devonian trilobites from Poland :)

I found them on October 20th, but I had to send it to a professional for preparation - and I picked them up from him last week, so I enclose the "before" and "after" pictures.

 

Date of discovery: October 20th

Date of preparation completion: November 8th

Scientific or Common name: Trimerocephalus chopinii

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Devonian

State, Province, or Region found: Poland, Kowala quarry

 

 

before.JPG

IMG_20171113_171919.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Foozil

Nice finds so far. :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBMugu

After 2 years of digging for shark teeth hoping to find a big Meg, I finally found one. It is over 5 inches long and in very good condition. I am posting photos of the tooth still in the layer/matrix in which it fossilized and after I cleaned it.

 

Date of discovery: Nov 10, 2017

Scientific or Common name: Carcharocles megalodon (a.k.a. Megalodon or Meg).

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Miocene Age, Round Mountain Silt Formation

State, Province, or Region found: Ernst Quarries, Bakersfield, California, USA.

 

 

 

MEG_FF__9.jpg

MEG_FF__12.jpg

MEG_FF__82.jpg

MEG_FF__83.jpg

MEG_FF__85.jpg

MEG_FF__86.jpg

MEG_FF__139.jpg

MEG_FF__140.jpg

MEG_FF__91.jpg

MEG_FF__87.jpg

MEG_FF__76.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Foozil

Lots of teeth so far! Great stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shamalama

Love the red color of that Meg. *wub*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruitbat

I can just hear you excavating that megalodon tooth now!  "PLEASE be in one piece!  Please! Please! PLEASE!"  :ighappy:

 

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBMugu
4 hours ago, Fruitbat said:

I can just hear you excavating that megalodon tooth now!  "PLEASE be in one piece!  Please! Please! PLEASE!"  :ighappy:

 

-Joe

That's exactly what we were saying!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruitbat

Been there...done that...got the T-Shirt...only mine wasn't a megalodon tooth!  Mine was with a rhinoceros mandible from the Pliocene of Northwest Texas (which WAS in one piece)!

 

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Has that mandible been pictured on TFF before? If not, I'd love to see it (in a topic of its own).

 

BTW: Stellar finds so far and the month is just halfway complete.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jesuslover340

Rather serendipitously, this Pallimnarchus croc jaw was found while we were taking a break from fossil hunting and went fishing instead on a property we already searched (and had permission to go on). Silly us. There are no breaks from fossil hunting!

Posting this a few days later after the initial discovery because we ( @Ash and I) wanted to clean and stabilize it. Had to scrub off a lot of algae. Then we took it to the museum just the other day; found out it is likely the most complete and best preserved jaw of Pallimnarchus pollens found to date! We'll be taking it back to get it CT scanned, but that's our update for now :)

 

Date of discovery: November 12th, 2017

Scientific or Common name: Pallimnarchus pollens jaw

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Plio-Pleistocene

State, Province, or Region found: Australia

Photos:

Screenshot_20171117-054146.thumb.jpg.5092c89151e0b5ce9b048c6505519114.jpg

20171117_054425.thumb.png.a59f16bac94943c16a26c486b5c786e4.png

Screenshot_20171117-054052.thumb.jpg.01bff3b30e647b44bf0d533cd4d97328.jpg

Screenshot_20171117-053746.thumb.jpg.53bbb66d8cf1f565bd71ed7c6e8fcc83.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

WOW! That is one sweet find @Jesuslover340.

Congratulations to You and Ash!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ash

To add it's also the only one known with essentially all its teeth and will fill in some knowledge gaps for the species after the CT scanning. So that's handy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Nice croc!

 

Glad the local museum is getting a chance to have a look at this if it is more complete than other specimens. Good on ya.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilized6s

@Jesuslover340 you and @Ash find the coolest stuff!!! That thing is just killer! Congratulations, guys. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro
15 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Rather serendipitously, this Pallimnarchus croc jaw was found while we were taking a break from fossil hunting and went fishing instead on a property we already searched (and had permission to go on). Silly us. There are no breaks from fossil hunting!

Posting this a few days later after the initial discovery because we ( @Ash and I) wanted to clean and stabilize it. Had to scrub off a lot of algae. Then we took it to the museum just the other day; found out it is likely the most complete and best preserved jaw of Pallimnarchus pollens found to date! We'll be taking it back to get it CT scanned, but that's our update for now :)

 

Date of discovery: November 12th, 2017

Scientific or Common name: Pallimnarchus pollens jaw

Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Plio-Pleistocene

State, Province, or Region found: Australia

Photos:

Screenshot_20171117-054146.thumb.jpg.5092c89151e0b5ce9b048c6505519114.jpg

20171117_054425.thumb.png.a59f16bac94943c16a26c486b5c786e4.png

Screenshot_20171117-054052.thumb.jpg.01bff3b30e647b44bf0d533cd4d97328.jpg

Screenshot_20171117-053746.thumb.jpg.53bbb66d8cf1f565bd71ed7c6e8fcc83.jpg

Awesome find!!! Doesn't get any better than that. Aussie croc fossils are very rare so little is known about them. Considering the amount of crocs that are around here today I think more finds like these need to be made to get a better picture of the history of crocs in Australia. Surely they have always been a large part of the ecosystem even tho there isn't all that much in the fossil record. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shamalama
On 11/16/2017 at 3:17 PM, Jesuslover340 said:

 

Screenshot_20171117-053746.thumb.jpg.53bbb66d8cf1f565bd71ed7c6e8fcc83.jpg

I love the emerging teeth in the jaw. Nice find!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruitbat

digit...

 

No...unfortunately I no longer have the rhino mandible due to unforeseen circumstances (it's a LONG story that I really don't want to get into).  It was a gem!  Teleoceras...complete right mandible with all teeth (including a very large incisor) in place (though slightly freeze-damaged). :(

 

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Northern Sharks

I guess I should enter my crinoid while I still have it. It was found October 21st and the last prep work done Nov. 11 (thanks again Malcolm). It's from the Ordovician Bobcaygeon formation in Ontario and will soon be on it's way to the Smithsonian to be described. Everyone there when I found it was stumped as to ID and after a lot of emailing and messaging, the result is, at the very least, a genus unreported from Ontario and possibly a new species.

23434847_1037210569754521_5708028077251309421_n.jpg

20171021_115052.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×