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HoJoon


        My story will be a bit(could be too much) long, so I put this report separately from @Kane's report. I'm not sure I can do this or not 'cause this is my first time to write same topic from others'. If I should not do this, I apologize administrator for making bothersome:(

 

 
        Before I start my story, I convey my profound and huge gratitude to @crinus for taking me quarries(these travels were my very first visiting to not only quarries, but also Ontario's fossil site!) and giving a lot of nice fossils to me what he found, and to @Northern Sharks for giving a nice specimen to me what he found as well from Brechin quarry and organizing Bowmanville journey(I didn't know that until seeing from @Kane's report. I'm not sure that you set the all plans), and to @Malcolmt for giving a complete crinoid to me, which is my first complete crinoid possessing arms and stems, and finally to everyone that I've met on this travel for welcoming me:dinothumb::dinothumb::D
        *Plus - My report will be incomplete 'cause I don't know that much about Ontario's geological information and some species' scientific names. So, I'll appreciate greatly if you guys tell me about right information and help me to correct it:trilowalk:
                   I revised this post a loooot of times 'cause I realized that it was not report, but a proper diary(Too Much Information.. and still, it's like a diary..)

 

 

        Well.. Now then, I'll begin my long story with some pictures though I couldn't make to take that many pictures of quarries and people. As for the Brechin quarry, I forgot to take my phone and there was no time to take DSLR out from my bag. And as for the Bowmanville quarry, I was so concentrating to find fossils that I forgot to take pictures:hammer01::D

 

 

*Date : Oct.21&22.2017

*Location : Brechin quarry & Bowmanville quarry

 

*Records of formation : Brechin quarry -   D     -----> Upper Verulam Formation(There was a "cluster" of fauna that I think it's different from below one. Color was bright grey and somewhat yellowish)

                                                                        DD    -----> Middle Verulam Formation(Bluish and grey rocks with vurnerable condition)

                                                                        DDD   -----> Lower Verulam Formation(Brown and grey rocks)

                                                                        DDDD -----> Upper Bobcaygeon Formation(Alternates between sublithogenic and medium calcarenitic limestone, but also includes some brown lithographic limestone and bluish fine-grained limestone in minor thicknesses)[*]

                                                                        [Buried under the ground] Middle Bobcaygeon Formation(Grey and brown, very fine grained to sublithogenic, sparsely fossiliferous limestone, with some fine-grained limestone in the upper part)[*]

                                                                        [Buried under the ground] Lower Bobcaygeon Formation(Brownish grey, fine- and medium-grained limestone)[*]

     (Reference - [*] Bobcaygeon formation - Weblex Canada. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://weblex.nrcan.gc.ca/html/001000/GSCC00053001579.html

                             @Northern Sharks informed me! Thank you! ;))

 

             Bowmanville quarry -     D          -----> Blue Mountain Formation (I couldn't get there.)

                                                       DD  Upper Lindsay formation

                                                                         DDD   Level 2 (?)

                                                       DDDD    Level 3(?)

                                                             -   Lower  Lindsay formation (Below as well. The quarry was so biiiiiig!!)

                                                             -

                                                                                  -

 

*Geological Age - Middle Ordovician

       

 

       These all rocks are what I took. Maybe I took a lot of fossils even if it is only a small part of trilobites. I just so excited that I found Ontario's trilobites directly, not through internet store or pictures! Well.. Now I'm worried the weight.. Could I take these whole fossils?... I should have considered about it, not just collect unnecessary things by my instinct. It was not a clever move..:(

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                                That crinoid(at 11 O'clock-wise) is not what I found these quarries. I found it from Scarbourough bluffers park before.20171025_081829.thumb.jpg.e663d49b1afe133bea038eb83a2a0968.jpg

 

 

        To begin, the beginning of the day(Oct.21) I've met @crinus first at the very early morning of the day(For me. 'cause I'm not the early bird type:D).

Actually, we met from Ebay. I won his two auction and I asked him that would you wait for me until I get to Canada in order to reduce shipping cost. Then, he offered me to go to quarries with him!:dinothumb:

    Anyway, we arrived there around at 8:30 AM and there were 4 or more people had already arrived. I've met @Malcolmt and two other people(Sorry, I can't remember the name. My poor memory..) on near the greenish and bluish pond in the quarry. After handshaking, @crinus and I went to the piles of rocks, which is near the pond. We climbed up the piles of rocks and met @Northern Sharks on there. He found one complete Calyptaulax sp. and dropped it from his hand while we were greeting each other(yet, fortunately, the trilobite was alive with small crack on the pygidium(if my memory is correct)):)

        After the greeting, @crinus and @Northern Sharks went to another place and I remained there, which was that @Northern Sharks found a trilobite, and looked for trilobites with hammering big rocks. I found a horn coral, which is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843, the cephalon part of Ceraurus sp. , and a loooot of brachiopods and so on:hammer01:

      

     It came from lower Verulam formation. This one is Lambeophyllum profundum Conrad, 1843( @Northern Sharks and @FossilDAWG informed me! Thank you! ;))

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       Ceraurus globulobatus?

    I don't know the exact name of this specimen.. This one maybe came from the middle Verulam formation because of its color. Though I found this from the lower Verulam formation area.

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HoJoon

        I don't remember how much time that I looked for trilobites at the same place. Meanwhile, @crinus called me to see the perfect cystoid that someone found. I went down from the piles and @Malcolmt gave me a complete crinoid! I appreciate him for giving a nice specimen to me. That is my first complete crinoid!:wub:

 

          @Malcolmt must have found this specimen from Bobcaygeon formation. I'm sure where it came from, but I don't know the scientific name of this specimen.. If somebody knows the name, please let me know...:(

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        After getting this crinoid, @crinus and I went to see nice complete cystoid that someone(maybe a couple) found. It was really nice specimen, though, unfortunately, I couldn't take picture that I didn't have camera(Actually, I took DSLR, but I forgot about it:(:wacko:...

       Anyway, after seeing that, @crinus and I looked for some fossils near there and he found nice(maybe just for me. Because no one wanted to take it. So, I took it at the very last moment of this quarry) Isotelus. @crinus took it with his saw from the parent rocks for me.. That's why we couldn't make to take "Family picture". I'm feeling deeply sorry about it... I really don't know how to express my appreciation:dinothumb::dinothumb:

 

     It's somewhat bigger than 1". This one just had some damage on the left side of the thorax and cephalon with no eyes. But, I'm able to find some features of Isotelus from this specimen.

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    On the way to take it out from the parent rock, it came out of the rock by overtly thin layer! It had some damage, but became way much easier to take! The weight reduced Extremely with small damage!!:D

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        We crept up the piles of rocks again and I repeated wandering and hitting rocks again and again, meanwhile he went to another place. I can't remember which specimens that I found that place, but I found a lot.

      I found this Raymondites ingalli from the lower Verulam formation area.

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        And I found this pygidium part of Isotelus gigas from the lower Verulam formation.

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        These rolled one and pygidium part of Isotelus?(I'm not sure 'cause it's anterior margin is somewhat round) gigas  is the another finding from the same area. 
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         After 30 mins? or 1 hour? @crinus offered me to go to another place, which is near the cliff in the opposite direction, from where I looked for fossils. Of course I told him that I would follow him after took my stuff(some findings and hammers) from the rock hill. He waited for me near my backpack and we went there after I put findings there. We walked along the cliff side up to near another pond, which was almost the end of the cliff side, and @crinus found a huge praspora grandis cluster while I found some small specimens of Flexi and incomplete trilobites:trilo::hammer01:

        Then, we went to his car in order to get his saw:trilowalk:

   

         I saw that @crinus already put those specimens' pics up on another report, but I put them up again  here. It's big!!

 

 

 

    He also gave below one specimen to me! It's not that small one I'm able to observe its feature! Thank you!!:D

But I'm not sure where it came from. This one came from lower Verulam formation.

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  These two Flexicalymene senaria Conrad, 1841 (@Northern Sharks informed me to correct it! Thank you! ;)) are that I found from the near cliff side while he was cutting the rocks with his saw. The color of parent rock seems the lower Verulam formation or possibly the middle Verulam formation slipped from the upper cliff(@crinus guessed it) long time ago.

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        There are some tubercles on its cephalon.

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        I found Isotelus gigas's tale-shield from the near cliff side, in the meantime @crinus was sawing prasopora.

     The color of parent rock seems that it came from the lower Verulam formation.

IMG_6594.thumb.JPG.c64355eb6a4f7a9b35122cc186d2b5fb.JPG

 

   @FossilDAWG informed me! Thank you! ;)!!:trilowalk: 

This one is Eobronteus lunatus Billings.

     I found this one near the cliff side. Its parent rock looks like from the lower or middle Verulam formation. 

   I heard that this one is rare in this quarry:wub:  And @FossilDAWG told me this one is REALLY "RARE"! I'm so happy to find it! Thank you for telling me this, @FossilDAWG!:dinothumb::)
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    I found this Isotelus gigas's pygidium from the near cliff side too, while @crinus was sawing. Its origin seems the lower Verulam formation.

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HoJoon

     I found this Flexicalymene senaria Conrad, 1841 and Isotelus gigas from near the pond where it was near the @crinus's prasopora cluster.

  There is a cephalopod? on this plate. I had doubted that it was Platyostoma, but it is not that flat on the edge part(last chamber?).IMG_6586.thumb.JPG.be110ae1047fb03326fc0d0159d565a6.JPG

 

         After taking out @crinus's prasopora, we went to the upper formation, which is the middle Verulam formation that I heard someone found a lot of rolled Flexicalymene from there.

@Northern Sharks already was there and found something, though I can't remember what they was.. Before we went together to high incline of rocks, @crinus and I walked around the cliff sides of the Verulam formation. However, we couldn't find anything 'cause the rocks were so dirty(literally there were layers of dusts).

 

        After getting to the piles of rocks, @crinus and @Northern Sharks climbed up there up to the other side, while I just remained to find trilobites.

Eventually, I found some bryozoa and parts of trilobite.

     StenoporaIMG_6604.thumb.JPG.9fb5ab7ce5d3eb723966c50d31cef6bc.JPG

 

      Maybe Raymondites? ingalli's part of free cheek.  This one has some tubercles.

  I'm not sure because Raymondites don't have any tubercles on anterior border, do they?

Please let me know if you know about this specimen..:(

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   I found these from the Verulam formation except a prasopora and Thaleops laurentiana(@Northern Sharks informed me the name of trilobite! Thank you! ;))

As for the Prasopora, I found it from the lower Verulam formation.

And in respect to Thaleops laurentiana, @Northern Sharks gave below the plate to me!:dinothumb::D

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        @Northern Sharks gave this plate to me, too. He found this from piles of rocks in the middle Verulam formation. I really appreciate him for giving me this nice plate!:dinothumb:

This one has a lot of parts of trilobites. It has more than 4 Flexicalymene's cephalon with some pygidia and one trilobite's both sides of free cheeks, which is Achatella achates Billings, 1860(@Northern Sharks and @FossilDAWG informed me the name of trilobite! Thank you! ;))

These two free cheeks have its compound EYE LENSES(Schizochroal eyes)!:wub::wub:

  @FossilDAWG told me that this one is really rare becuase of its rarity and its eye preservation! I deeply appreciate @Northern Sharks!!:dinothumb:

 

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EYE LENSES!
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EYE LENSES!!:wub:
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      As you know, I forgot to take my phone, so @crinus took this picture for me! Thank you!:dinothumb:

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    The quarry was bigger than my expectation. It was much easier to access than natural fossil site!:o

If this kind of quarry, which is able to find fossils, were in my country, it would have been great and probably I would have been there frequently. But I don't think that it will happen or someone will make it.:(

 

      @crinus took my picture, too! Thank you so much!:dinothumb:
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HoJoon

 

 

 

        After leaving Brechin quarry, I felt somewhat tired. Maybe I should do some more exercise...

 

    The very next day, @crinus took me to the Bowmanville quarry, again!:dinothumb: I heard from @crinus and @Northern Sharks that I would find complete or nice trilobites from this quarry and it was true(though I couldn't find not exactly complete one)!

 

      On this day, I took my phone that I could take some pictures! :) 
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        This was my second trip to the quarry and I was REALLY startled again because of its size! It was really vast and profound, even than the Brechin quarry!

And @crinus told me that more huge quarry is in the Michigan, even people cannot see the end of the quarry from one side! I can't even imagine...:trilosurprise:
 


      Anyway, to begin, we went to a level as like other people, at first.

  I wandered piles of rocks about 2 hours with any findings. When I was about to decide to move to another location, there was a nice Isotelus mafritzae!:wub::wub:

Although it doesn't have its eyes and no shells on the head, its thorax and tale-shield are pretty good condition and I can see its hypostome!:wub:

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       There is hypostome!:D
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    Mold part of Isotelus mafritzae is good, too!:)
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        I also found this Illaenidae(Nanillaenus?). Even if it is only part of cephalon, I heard from @crinus that these species are rare in Lindsay formation.

  Please! let me know the exact name of it if you know:( I really would like to know the exact name of this species!!:wacko:

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HoJoon

    After about 2 hours, @crinus took me to the Level 2.

And as soon as we got there, he found GREAT CLUSTER of TRILOBITES!:envy:

There were 9 Pseudogygites latimarginatus!!

Can you believe it? WOW! A Cluster of trilobites!:trilosurprise:
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       He was going to take 7 trilobites from here, but a plate, which had 2 trilobites on it, cracked.. I tried to take them out from parent rock and it was really difficult!..

The issue about them was somewhat sad, but he gave me one of them!!:dinothumb: It's gorgeous!! It has genal spine, head and thorax and tale, too!:wub::wub: 

     I really appreciate @crinus!! :dinothumb:

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:wub::wub:

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:wub::wub::wub:

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    Next one is a hypostome of Isotelus? sp.

I found several hypostoma, but I took only this one. There were abundant, but good one was rare.

Maybe this one belongs Isotelus sp.IMG_6620.thumb.JPG.e58a6f7e8f7aff4ebe1616a4e1ac25cf.JPG

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HoJoon

        I found this too from the same location.

   Maybe this one is some parts of Isotelus gigas. It has a part of cephalon and nice pygidium.
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        Leviceraurus mammilloides?

   I found this from same level, while @crinus was cutting his majestic trilobites. I found the information from 'fossil museum', but I'm not sure.

  Even so, the genus name "Leviceraurus" for sure.

  It doesn't have its cephalon and another pygidial spine, but it still has a nice pygidial spine and some pleura!:wub::wub:

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       This one is Pseudogygites latimarginatus.

   I found this too in the same location. I wish its head-shield is buried under the rock, but I think the possibility is low..

  Maybe this one doesn't have its cephalon, though its thorax and pygidium is so nice!:D

     Probably this one is one of my today's finding!:wub:
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        Maybe this one is Isotelus mafritzae. 

  I took this because of its eye. I expected that I could observe its eye lenses.

 However, this one maybe was eroded so much that I could not observe its lens even with 40 magnitude eyepiece.:(

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        And @crinus found this roller from the other piles of rocks, but still level 2, and gave it to me!!:dinothumb:

  This one is splendid as like Pseudogygites! I think this one is Isotelus mafritzae because of its round pygydium margin.

  Though its shell had damaged, it has complete thorax and pygidium:wub::wub::wub:     I hope it has its cephalon(but probably it doesn't have..)
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        This one is one of my today's finding!!:D

   Although it doesn't have its eyes, some membranes and one pygidial spine(only mold part) has preserved pretty nice condition!(For me:blush:)

  It has cephalon, thorax with the pleura, and tale-shield with pygidial spine!:wub::wub::wub:

          Maybe this one is Ceraurus globulobatus
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       I found this Flexi's tale from the other side of Ceraurus's parent rock:)IMG_6635.thumb.JPG.ccf31bac45f55d00c87e97c43e665777.JPG

 

        I found this one at the same location(level 2), just a few feet apart from Ceraurus. 

  The eye is huuuge! I expected to see the eye lenses as well, but it seems not preserved at all.

  Maybe it has preserved just only its eye facet and eroded too much.

Although it doesn't have its eye lenses, I love this one! The BIG eye!:wub::wub:
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     This time somebody took my picture(sorry, I can't remember his name..).

   As for the two fossil hunting trips, it was really great experience for me! You know, this is my 7 and 8th time to visit the fossil site and 1st and 2nd time to visit the proper fossiliferous quarries(And BIG). I'll never forget about this travels!

    Finally, I deeply appreciate @crinus for taking me some quarries and giving some presents to me. Even I can't overstate this appreciation.20171022_151101.thumb.jpg.bae4de2789327919fb937f249fc6efc8.jpg

 

 

 

 

     Thank you for reading this looong and diary-like report! And I look forward to receiving some information if you know!:D

 

 

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Kane

Wow, @HoJoon, I had no idea you were on TFF! I saw you with Crinus, but didn't put two and two together. Kept meaning to talk to you, but everything was so busy! I'm siure - or hoping - you'll be on our next trips. It would be great to chat with you as we break rock. :) Judging by this pics, you did remarkably well! Bravo, sir!

 

This is a fantastic, detailed report, by the way. You broke rock with us, and you are more than entitled to tell your tale. :) These photos are fantastic.

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Northern Sharks

Hi HoJoon, it was nice to have met you. Your coral is Lambeophyllum profundum. At that quarry, it is almost all Verulam formation. The Bobcaygeon formation starts about 6-10 feet above the floor of the bottom pit. Anything found on top of the pile where we first met would be Verulam. The Flexicalymene trilobites from this site are all F. senaria, not croneisi. The loose cephalon I gave you was from Thaleops laurentiana and the mystery cephalon on the plate I gave you is from Achatella achates.

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FossilDAWG

Hi HoJoon,

 

It looks like you had an excellent introduction to Ontario's Ordovician fossils!

The solitary (horn) coral might be a Lambeophyllum profundum.  It is not possible to be certain without seeing a cross section, but the ridges on the outside (which correspond to the septa internally) are more typical of Lambeophyllum than Streptelasma profundum, the other common Bobcaygeon coral.  

 

The "rare" trilobite pygidium is an Eobronteus lunatus (Billings), and it is indeed very rare.  I was never able to collect even a fragment of that species when I lived in Ontario.  That is a very special fossil.

 

The trilobite with the high conical eye in the last couple of photos is most likely an Achatella achates (Billings).  This is an uncommon species, and it is rare to find one with the eyes intact as they stick up and so are usually broken off.  This is another great find.

 

The free cheek with tubercles looks like a Flexicalymene to me.  I think Raymondites does not have tubercles.

 

Again congratulations on some rare finds!

 

Don

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HoJoon

I'll reply after finish my dinner! This report took really enormous time! Please wait a minute.. Thank you! :D

 

 

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Kane

The  Eobronteus lunatus pygidium does make me jealous, but on that day I found my fragment of Amphilichas ottawensis so feel less bad. :P That is an incredible find. 

 

That Ceraurus is lovely, by the way.

 

As for the Isotelus roller you have there, I wonder if that was the same one I encountered with the orange marking tape. It was where on the same level you and Crinus were, and I was curious if the saw was used to get that one out as I would love to see if that one was complete, despite the thoracic damage from blasting. 

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HoJoon

Thank you for waiting! I just finished my dinner!

 

18 minutes ago, Kane said:

Wow, @HoJoon, I had no idea you were on TFF! I saw you with Crinus, but didn't put two and two together. Kept meaning to talk to you, but everything was so busy! I'm siure - or hoping - you'll be on our next trips. It would be great to chat with you as we break rock. :) Judging by this pics, you did remarkably well! Bravo, sir!

 

This is a fantastic, detailed report, by the way. You broke rock with us, and you are more than entitled to tell your tale. :) These photos are fantastic.

         Hi Kane!

   Thank you so much for saying so! This report took really a lot of time:D

    Actually, it's not been much time after I joined here. I put my name just last June :)

    I'm happy to talk with people who met this travel again as well!:)

   I really hope to join with your next hunting, but, unfortunately, I need to go back to Korea to get a Visa on this December 2nd and I'm going to go to Vermont on next January. If I had a car(and accepted to enter the quarry), I definitely would have been the quarry again:(

    Anyway, as for my tale, I was going to deal with more personal one, such as chatting, my feeling, joking or moving somewhere, etc. But, you know, if I did that, it was maybe too much information contained :)

So, I decided to cut small scale event..

   Thanks for everyone, I could have really unforgettable time that days!

    Thank you so much and I look forward to talk you again! :)

 

16 minutes ago, Northern Sharks said:

Hi HoJoon, it was nice to have met you. Your coral is Lambeophyllum profundum. At that quarry, it is almost all Verulam formation. The Bobcaygeon formation starts about 6-10 feet above the floor of the bottom pit. Anything found on top of the pile where we first met would be Verulam. The Flexicalymene trilobites from this site are all F. senaria, not croneisi. The loose cephalon I gave you was from Thaleops laurentiana and the mystery cephalon on the plate I gave you is from Achatella achates.

   Hi Northern sharks, again! :)

Wow, I wrote a lot of wrong information.. I'll change it until today!

  I though that lowest one and the piles of rock were Bobcaygeon formation.

  And I deeply appreciate you for giving a lot of information to me!!:dinothumb::dinothumb:

It was really wondering for me.. Now my head is getting clear! :D

 

 

 

15 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

Hi HoJoon,

 

It looks like you had an excellent introduction to Ontario's Ordovician fossils!

The solitary (horn) coral might be a Lambeophyllum profundum.  It is not possible to be certain without seeing a cross section, but the ridges on the outside (which correspond to the septa internally) are more typical of Lambeophyllum than Streptelasma profundum, the other common Bobcaygeon coral.  

 

The "rare" trilobite pygidium is an Eobronteus lunatus (Billings), and it is indeed very rare.  I was never able to collect even a fragment of that species when I lived in Ontario.  That is a very special fossil.

 

The trilobite with the high conical eye in the last couple of photos is most likely an Achatella achates (Billings).  This is an uncommon species, and it is rare to find one with the eyes intact as they stick up and so are usually broken off.  This is another great find.

 

The free cheek with tubercles looks like a Flexicalymene to me.  I think Raymondites does not have tubercles.

 

Again congratulations on some rare finds!

 

Don

    Hi FossilDAWG!

 

   I deeply appreciate you for giving information to me! I really wondered about it! :D

   I'm so glad to hear that not only the name of the specimen, but also its rarity or other information!:dinothumb::trilowalk:

   I really should appreciate @Northern Sharks for giving that "rare" free cheeks with great eyes!:dinothumb:

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HoJoon
51 minutes ago, Kane said:

The  Eobronteus lunatus pygidium does make me jealous, but on that day I found my fragment of Amphilichas ottawensis so feel less bad. :P That is an incredible find. 

 

That Ceraurus is lovely, by the way.

 

As for the Isotelus roller you have there, I wonder if that was the same one I encountered with the orange marking tape. It was where on the same level you and Crinus were, and I was curious if the saw was used to get that one out as I would love to see if that one was complete, despite the thoracic damage from blasting. 

    That was really lucky to find! Maybe that one was my Today's finding! :D

    Though I found that one, the others also found really great things for me! Even someone found complete one, and you found Amphilichas ottawensis! I really surprised after seeing it! :)

  In addtion, I saw your complete Pseudogygites! And you went to Arcona and found great things a lot! I envy you :envy::D

 

   As for the Ceraurus, though it doesn't have its eyes, but other detail is good! I love it!:wub:

 

   In regard to Isotelus, yes. This one is what you mentioned before on your report. @crinus found it and gave it to me!:dinothumb: I can't see something like black layer on its cutting-edge. Hopefully, it buried way more under than cutting-edge, but, as you know, I think it's possibility is low..

3 minutes ago, HoJoon said:

    That was really lucky to find! Maybe that one was my Today's finding! :D

    Though I found that one, the others also found really great things for me! Even someone found complete one, and you found Amphilichas ottawensis! I really surprised after seeing it! :)

 

   As for the Ceraurus, though it doesn't have its eyes, but other detail is good! I love it!:wub:

 

   In regard to Isotelus, yes. This one is what you mentioned before on your report. @crinus found it and gave it to me!:dinothumb: I can't see something like black layer on its cutting-edge. Hopefully, it buried way more under than cutting-edge, but, as you know, I think it's possibility is low..

   If you want, I'll put some pictures of its cutting-edge surface?(sliced surface?) for you :)

 

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Peat Burns

Wow.  Great report!  Felt like I was there.  Congrats on many great finds and acquisitions. 

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ynot

Nice report, nice pictures and wonderful finds!

Thanks for sharing Your enthusiasum for fossil hunting!

Good luck on the rest of Your trip.

Tony

 

PS You can always send some of Your finds home by mail.

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HoJoon
2 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

Hi HoJoon,

 

It looks like you had an excellent introduction to Ontario's Ordovician fossils!

The solitary (horn) coral might be a Lambeophyllum profundum.  It is not possible to be certain without seeing a cross section, but the ridges on the outside (which correspond to the septa internally) are more typical of Lambeophyllum than Streptelasma profundum, the other common Bobcaygeon coral.  

 

The "rare" trilobite pygidium is an Eobronteus lunatus (Billings), and it is indeed very rare.  I was never able to collect even a fragment of that species when I lived in Ontario.  That is a very special fossil.

 

The trilobite with the high conical eye in the last couple of photos is most likely an Achatella achates (Billings).  This is an uncommon species, and it is rare to find one with the eyes intact as they stick up and so are usually broken off.  This is another great find.

 

The free cheek with tubercles looks like a Flexicalymene to me.  I think Raymondites does not have tubercles.

 

Again congratulations on some rare finds!

 

Don

    Hi Don,

 

 As for the free cheek with tubercles, however, I think it's different from Flexicalymene 'cause that one's genal spine is not that long. But thank you for telling me. I will keep finding! Thank you! :D

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HoJoon
47 minutes ago, Peat Burns said:

Wow.  Great report!  Felt like I was there.  Congrats on many great finds and acquisitions. 

   Thank you for saying so! I'm so glad to hear that!:D

 

 

46 minutes ago, ynot said:

Nice report, nice pictures and wonderful finds!

Thanks for sharing Your enthusiasum for fossil hunting!

Good luck on the rest of Your trip.

Tony

 

PS You can always send some of Your finds home by mail.

   Hi Tony,

     That's a great idea! :)  Actually, I thought that, but I hesitated by fear of using it. Because, you know, I've never used the international postal service before. But, maybe I should go to the airport in advance to check the weight. After that, if thw weight is too heavy, then I should send some fossils to home via mail!

   Thank you so much for saying about my journey, too! :D

 

HoJoon

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HoJoon
2 hours ago, Northern Sharks said:

Hi HoJoon, it was nice to have met you. Your coral is Lambeophyllum profundum. At that quarry, it is almost all Verulam formation. The Bobcaygeon formation starts about 6-10 feet above the floor of the bottom pit. Anything found on top of the pile where we first met would be Verulam. The Flexicalymene trilobites from this site are all F. senaria, not croneisi. The loose cephalon I gave you was from Thaleops laurentiana and the mystery cephalon on the plate I gave you is from Achatella achates.

Oh, I forgot to tell you that it was really nice to meet you and nice to talk with you again! :D

:dinothumb:

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HoJoon

       Actually, I found this plate from the upper Verulam formation. This one is harder than that of the middle Verulam formation and its color is different. Moreover, its deposit environment could be guessed that it was faster burial than that of the middle Verulam formation because of its congregation phase(more closer and more abundant) of animal(but still it was slow burial, not extremely slow). And maybe the middle Verulam formation was not extremely slow burial environment nut slower than its upper one due to its congregation phase.

 

I found this one on the way of getting @crinus's saw from his car. As we got to 1 of 4th of the way to go to down, he forgot to take fuels to generate his saw. So, he went back to his car and in the meantime, I climbed up to the cliff side which is located near the entrance. There were a lot of sow bugs-like insects in the slab. So, I gave up to take it out, but I found some plates placed on the ground(still cliff).

 

   However, I'm considering not taking this one 'cause this one doesn't have rare species or complete one and heavy. If it were not heavy, I definitely would have decided to take it.

 

   This one has a huge amount of animals including crinoids, bryozoa, brachiopods, gastropods, and even some trilobites.

IMG_6605.thumb.JPG.eb3132da90c4874451626d11b710f66f.JPG

 

     Flexicalymene senaria's cephalon. This one is about 1".

IMG_6606.thumb.JPG.8ba7d3337856d3d7fc01737e090d5640.JPG

 

    This one is Ceraurus? sp.

 I don't know this one is Ceraurus or other something Ceraurus.

IMG_6607.thumb.JPG.8a04f3bf8df8f81f0ae3ae59013dcbf6.JPG

IMG_6608.JPG.7f0a8b2604a524d469f8227a77f55fef.JPG

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Northern Sharks

Yes, that hash plate holds the glabella of a Ceraurus sp.

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Monica

Wow, @HoJoon - what a wonderful trip report!  I smiled the entire time I was reading your report - your excitement re: finding trilobites came through as clear as day :)

 

When do you go back to Korea?  Will you be in Ontario for a while so you can collect even more trilobites (hopefully!) while you're here?

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and feelings as you explored Brechin and Bowmanville - it was a really nice read for me!

 

Monica

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HoJoon

 

3 hours ago, Northern Sharks said:

Yes, that hash plate holds the glabella of a Ceraurus sp.

     Thank you!:dinothumb: I'll erase '?' very soon! :D

 

 

2 hours ago, Monica said:

Wow, @HoJoon - what a wonderful trip report!  I smiled the entire time I was reading your report - your excitement re: finding trilobites came through as clear as day :)

 

When do you go back to Korea?  Will you be in Ontario for a while so you can collect even more trilobites (hopefully!) while you're here?

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and feelings as you explored Brechin and Bowmanville - it was a really nice read for me!

 

Monica

   Hi @Monica

    It's nice to talk with you again! :)

I'm so glad to hear that you enjoyed my long and diary-like report! Thank you for saying so!:D

    I'm going to leave Toronto on this December 2nd(Sat). I would like to see some more trilobites, but I'm not sure. I'll try to find on Mimico creek or Etobicoke creek 2 weeks later and Niagara falls on middle of November. Hopefully find something :D

     Again, I appreciate you for enjoying my report! It was worth writing this one though it took really a lot of time!:dinothumb:

    Hopefully find more and post more here in the near future!

 

HoJoon

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WhodamanHD

Some very nice finds! I love those isotelus trilos!

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crinus

HoJoon,

It was a pleasure to introduce you to Ontario fossil collecting and in particular to the worlds best Ordovician collecting area, aka Brechin.  It was also a pleasure to introduce you to a lot of really great fossil collectors.  They make lifelong friends.  You also introduced me to a Korean culture (the bbq was interesting) and to a Toronto I was not aware of.  I had never been in an actual Toronto neighborhood and that was an eye opener.  Sorry Torontonians but I could not live like that.  Houses a foot apart!  Maybe 2 feet. Not for me. I need lots of space.

 

We will have to try and figure out a way to get you up there again while you are going to school in Burlington, Vermont.  Like I told you, car rentals in the US are cheap.

 

Here is a link to the world's largest quarry in Roger City Michigan. http://www.greatlakesgazette.com/2013/06/01/wolds-largest-limestone-quarry-is-pure-michigan/  They do come bigger than Bowmanville and that place is not small. 

 

Just want clarify the area where I was cutting the Prasopora was all Verulam.  I don't think the Prosopora is found in the Bobcaygeon (at least I don't have one from the Bobcaygeon). 

 

Sorry for cutting you off last night, but it was our fossil group meeting night and I couldn't have Khazad Doom coming on every few seconds.

Joe

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Nimravis

Great trip report and pictures. Congrats on all of your finds and I especially like the hash plates.

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