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Jeffrey P

Big Brook, New Jersey unknown object

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Jeffrey P

Found this rather odd looking object in an upper tributary of Big Brook today. I have no idea if this is a fossil or not and if so what kind. Never found anything like this before. Big Brook is in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Any ID help would be very appreciated. Thank you. 

image1 (223).JPG

image1 (222).JPG

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caldigger

It looks to have bone texture, perhaps something fishy?

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old bones

It seems a bit big for, but reminds me of those spiky things under the skin of a blowfish... forget the proper name right now.

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KimTexan

I have no idea what period or fossils you find in that area, but could it be part of an antler or something like that?

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Ropterus

Nice find! Pretty rare from what I've read. Congrats!

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RickNC

Hybodus sp cephalic hook. Nice find!

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frankh8147
10 hours ago, josephstrizhak said:

It is a hybodont cephalic clasper.

Agreed! Nice find! They are pretty rare there.

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RJB

A cephalic clasper?  Never heard of that before. Just read up on that.  cool.

 

RB

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Jeffrey P
12 hours ago, josephstrizhak said:

It is a hybodont cephalic clasper.

Thanks a bunch for the ID help. That piece really did mystify me.

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JohnBrewer
5 hours ago, RJB said:

A cephalic clasper?  Never heard of that before. Just read up on that.  cool.

 

RB

Me too. :)

 

heres a previous thread

 

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RickNC

I have a site where they can be found with some regularity but definitely not common. So far I've found the teeth to be even more scarce. 

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PyritizeMe

Definitely, reminds me of bone material, most likely something fish. 

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Shamalama

Oooo, that is something different Jeffrey. Nice find!

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sixgill pete
3 hours ago, PyritizeMe said:

Definitely, reminds me of bone material, most likely something fish. 

 

it is the cephalic hook oh the shark Meristodonoides c.f.. novojerseyensis as previously stated. A Hybontontiforme shark.

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Carl
16 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

I think these are now I.D.'d as Meristodonoides cf novojerseyensis 

 

It is a Hybodontiforme. The place RickNC refered to here they are relatively common. I often find 5 or 6 hooks / parts of hooks on a trip. Teeth are a little more scarce, but not uncommon.

That is so odd... Only the males had these and no more than 4 per individual, whereas, males and females could each produce maybe 20,000 teeth in a lifetime. What taphonomic wonder could account for a site being richer in hooks than teeth? Amazing!

 

I may find a hook for every 20 hybodont teeth in NJ.

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Al Dente

Here a hybodont model from the American Museum of Natural History that shows these claspers.

20141102_141659.jpg

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josephstrizhak
1 hour ago, Carl said:

That is so odd... Only the males had these and no more than 4 per individual, whereas, males and females could each produce maybe 20,000 teeth in a lifetime. What taphonomic wonder could account for a site being richer in hooks than teeth? Amazing!

 

I may find a hook for every 20 hybodont teeth in NJ.

I'm not entirely sure, but maybe the teeth are destroyed more easily when being fossilized due to their composition. But it would also make sense that the claspers should be more abraded because of their larger size and more fragile structure. I guess it could also depend on the things present in the soil that could dissolve certain minerals.

I would guess that in New Jersey the ratio between claspers and teeth is a bit high as well, considering how many teeth there should have been for 1 clasper. I think that in New Jersey the fossilization of the teeth is better than the other site, but I guess that overall Meristodonoides was more common at the other site because more claspers are found.

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westcoast
26 minutes ago, josephstrizhak said:

I'm not entirely sure, but maybe the teeth are destroyed more easily when being fossilized due to their composition. But it would also make sense that the claspers should be more abraded because of their larger size and more fragile structure. I guess it could also depend on the things present in the soil that could dissolve certain minerals.

I would guess that in New Jersey the ratio between claspers and teeth is a bit high as well, considering how many teeth there should have been for 1 clasper. I think that in New Jersey the fossilization of the teeth is better than the other site, but I guess that overall Meristodonoides was more common at the other site because more claspers are found.

I don't know the area at all but could size/shape sorting be a factor in the unusual relative distribution?

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josephstrizhak
1 minute ago, westcoast said:

I don't know the area at all but could size/shape sorting be a factor in the unusual relative distribution?

I guess it could possibly be a factor, but it is likely that people in the area use a finer screen in order to catch the smaller items.

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non-remanié

Size sorting in high energy lags is a very real phenomenon, but it is often quite difficult to quantify due to isolated outcrops and exposures.   Carl, just consider the faunal differences at your research site and the one I donated all that material from.  It's the same lag; the same high energy stratigraphic level.  But localized environmental differences during the lag's genesis can lead to very different lag characteristics.  

5 hours ago, Carl said:

That is so odd... Only the males had these and no more than 4 per individual, whereas, males and females could each produce maybe 20,000 teeth in a lifetime. What taphonomic wonder could account for a site being richer in hooks than teeth? Amazing!

 

I may find a hook for every 20 hybodont teeth in NJ.

 

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Carl
22 hours ago, non-remanié said:

Size sorting in high energy lags is a very real phenomenon, but it is often quite difficult to quantify due to isolated outcrops and exposures.   Carl, just consider the faunal differences at your research site and the one I donated all that material from.  It's the same lag; the same high energy stratigraphic level.  But localized environmental differences during the lag's genesis can lead to very different lag characteristics.  

 

Oh I know. But it always just seems so magical.

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non-remanié

Absolutely agree.  It's fascinating and makes interpretations interesting, to say the least!   

 

 

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