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Bess

What's inside this rock?

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Bess

My brother found this rock in a small area full of rocks near Miry Run in Hamilton NO. The rocck in this area is mostly form the Triassic and Cretacious with a small bit of rock from the Cambrian. Inside the rock, there is a circle that has 2 "prongs" coming of of it. My brother thinks that it is a vertebra. Here is a picture.

The 2 prongs are on the bottom. I hope you can identify this. Thank you in advance.:)

 

 

 

1510237842159923029630.thumb.jpg.5fef46f318cf56d7d922a8d9d2e796d6.jpg

 

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ynot

Can We see pictures from other angles?  Front, back, top, bottom and sides, please.

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Fossildude19

Cropped the image. 

 

1510237842159923029630.jpg.c26dc052eba1b80f11a77337817d6159.jpg

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Bess

1510240138840575213581.thumb.jpg.0df11256b2e994aa2e4757ab1a0e377d.jpgSide15102401026481217523890.thumb.jpg.b0bc2ae31ef5b3af26f035e6b2bfe51f.jpgBottom15102400046341369661911.thumb.jpg.3ce137618c0374ae4ca9639b78ccc01d.jpgTop

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Tidgy's Dad

Looks like bits of brachiopod to me. 

Possibly bivalve. 

 

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ynot

Yeah, it is not a vertebrae.

It could be a bivalve, but hard to be sure with the amount of erosion on it. Definitely looks like shell of some type.

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Bess

I LIKE TRILOBITES...thanks for your replies.:trilo:

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Kane

I think @FossilDAWG may have it. You can also make out the impression of the tubercles on the glabella. 

 

To better confirm, you might be able to remove some of the overlying matrix (particularly between glabella and eye). 

 

If this is a phacopid (and it may be, for as much of the eye we can see), you may need to have a closer look at where this was collected from as it would not be Cambrian, Triassic, nor Cretaceous, and so most likely Devonian. To confirm, you may want to go back and collect a few more samples of the rock - and I assume you will want to anyway if there are trilobites to be found. :) :hammer01::trilo:

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FossilDAWG

By the way, where is Hamilton NO?  There is no state with an abbreviation NO.

 

Don

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GeschWhat

I think it is New Jersey...with a bit of an accent. :D

 

Were their trilos in the Triassic & Cretaceous?

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Bess
1 hour ago, FossilDAWG said:

By the way, where is Hamilton NO?  There is no state with an abbreviation NO.

 

Don

That was a mistake. Oops. I meant NJ.:D

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FossilDAWG

Paleozoic fossils are not uncommon in stream and glacially transported pebbles and cobbles in New Jersey.  I have some confidence that your specimen originated in Devonian rocks in northern New Jersey (where the Coeymans Limestone, the Mahantango Formation, and the Marcellis Formation occur) or further north/northwest in Pennsylvannia or New York.

 

Don

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Bess

Thanks for the reply.:trilo::D

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Bess

I am thinking about making a small Trilobite "exhibit". Is it possible that you can identify the genus or family that it is from (if it is a trilobite)? Thanks.:D

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Bess

Here's a picture of one of the eyes. Thanks again for your replies.:)

151027516986236161112.thumb.jpg.e6a0f6c4e832dd6981c6f187a56ca0bc.jpg

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Douvilleiceras
9 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

Were their trilos in the Triassic & Cretaceous?

The last trilobites were wiped out in the Permian Extinction. By the time of their demise, only a few genera of the Order Proetida still survived, marking a major decline from the dozens of families and many more genera alive during pre-Carboniferous times.

 

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