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Mystery Ontario crinoid


Northern Sharks

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Northern Sharks

I've posted this on FB, but a certain expert is rarely on there. This was the crinoid I found a few weeks ago that had everyone stumped at the time. Now, after my preliminary prep and then an hour or so of Malcolm's magic, none of us are any the wiser as to what it is. It's from Ontario's Ordovician Bobcaygeon formation and doesn't match anything in the local reference book. It seems as though the plates at the bottom are fairly distinctive so does anyone have any clue as to a possible identification????

23434847_1037210569754521_5708028077251309421_n.jpg

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Very cool find Kevin. The plates are nicely ornamented around the sides.  I'm sure @crinus will know.

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I was thinking of crinus too, but I'm pretty sure you've already asked him. Have you tried Bill Hessin? Looks great by the way!

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Northern Sharks

Bill has seen it on FB,but no input as far as ID. Crinus seems to be missing in action, but he's been tagged here, on FB and received a personal email from yours truly. He saw it when it was found and had no idea, I don't know if the finished product will provide a Eureka moment or not.

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Try another Bill, the leading expert on Paleozoic crinoids.  He is always happy to assist:  LINK

 

 

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Northern Sharks

@FossilDAWG Periglyptocrinus was the closest that Malcolm and I could come up with, but it still doesn't seem to match. I have to change the eyepieces in my scope for a better look, but at 10X magnification, the arms look uniserial to me. Periglyptocrinus has biserial arms.

@piranha Thanks for the link. I'll send off a pic to him and see what he thinks

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Did not think the arms attached correctly to be Periglyptocrinus, the arms are definately uniserial and the attachment of the stem to the calyx just seems wrong.

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wow, goregeous. Exciting...was it from a split shale, did you prep it, or did it reveal itself in all that resplendant glory without much cleanup. 

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Yes, crinus was missing.  Been cutting down trees and chipping away all the branches.  Boy am I sore.  Can use a couple days of rest.

 

Crinus is very much leaning towards Glyptocrinus.  The stem is right. The calyx is crushed but appears to be Glyptocrinus.  Malcolm says that the arms are uniserial which would mean Glyptocrinus.  Both Periglyptocrinus and Archaeocrinus have biserial arms.  The only thing I don't see is a branching of the arms.  Periglyptocrinus does not branch and Archaeocrinus branching will depend on the species.  Glyptocrinus should branch once but the branching can be broken off. 

 

Even so, I will forward this photo to "Bill" the expert.  As some of you know, Bill, two of his former students and I have been working for the past three years on the crinoids of the Brechin area.  So far two manuscripts have been submitted and accepted with two more coming soon.  Archaeocrinus was covered in one of the accepted manuscripts and the two species from the Brechin will have new species names assigned.  Glyptocrinus and Periglyptocrinus will be covered in one of the up coming manuscripts. 

 

Joe

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Northern Sharks

Assuming this is all the same Bill we're talking about now, I heard back from him this morning with his response being Diabolocrinus. This ID was also suggested by L.Cole. Not that I'm doubting the guru of Brechin area crinoids- Glyptocrinus is somewhat common and Diabolocrinus would be VERY rare, but this is an enigma I'd like to have resolved.

@dalmayshun It was found on a rock that had naturally split. I did some prep work and Malcolm did a lot more detailed prep under his scope. The before pic can be seen in this topic

 

 

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Interesting.  Yes, we are talking the same Bill and Lena.  I will have to contact Lena and ask for an explanation.  The crinoid I was calling Diabolocrinus, she changed to a new genus. But that doesn't matter because yours looks nothing like it.  If I was to look at something different from all the genera that we know occur at Brechin, I would have gone with Pararchaeocrinus.  That appears to be a better match.  However, the Diabolocrinus id will work also.  Either way, it appears to be something that is not in any of the upcoming publications. Unfortunately, the manuscript that would have included "Diabolocrinus" is one of the completed/ accepted ones.  It would have been nice to include another genus.  You should have found this last year. 

Joe

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Starting to look like the November Invertebrate Fossil of The Month. This beastie just keeps getting Cooler and Cooler

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  • 6 months later...

And the winner is:

Parachaeocrinus kiddi n.sp.

 

Congratulations. 

 

Will be published sometime in 2018 (hopefully). 

Joe

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More than extra cool! Congrats!!

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On 6/14/2018 at 12:35 PM, crinus said:

And the winner is:

Parachaeocrinus kiddi n.sp.

 

Congratulations. 

 

Will be published sometime in 2018 (hopefully). 

Joe

So, just for those that are not so familiar with crinoids-- Is that a new species?:headscratch:

 

Awesome find either way.

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What a lovely crinoid - congrats all round! :)

 

Every time I see one of these it reminds me about some Middle Ord ones from Wales that I need to write up. So many fossils, so little time... We tend to get relatives of US ones, so I might have to ask on here if anyone has seen the same...

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Northern Sharks

I never saw the recent replies until now, but since the word is out now -WOOOHOOO!!!!! Crinus had told me about the name in a private email, but I was waiting until it was published before announcing it here. For those who don't know, it is a new species and named after me. 

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Paciphacops
On 6/19/2018 at 4:48 AM, Northern Sharks said:

For those who don't know, it is a new species and named after me.

 

That's really awesome! :envy:

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5 hours ago, Northern Sharks said:

I never saw the recent replies until now, but since the word is out now -WOOOHOOO!!!!! Crinus had told me about the name in a private email, but I was waiting until it was published before announcing it here. For those who don't know, it is a new species and named after me. 

I asked Lena about posting the new names and she said it was ok.  I updated my web page to reflect some of the new names.  Couldn't add this one to it because I do not have a decent picture of it.  I will get one soon and I hope you don't mind if I add it to my web page.  Obviously I do not have one of my own.

Joe

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Northern Sharks
1 hour ago, crinus said:

I asked Lena about posting the new names and she said it was ok.  I updated my web page to reflect some of the new names.  Couldn't add this one to it because I do not have a decent picture of it.  I will get one soon and I hope you don't mind if I add it to my web page.  Obviously I do not have one of my own.

Joe

I'd consider it an honour (and yes, that's how we spell it up north).

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