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Greg.Wood

Lake Ontario finds, Whitby ON

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Greg.Wood

Some recent finds from Lake Ontario, East of Toronto.

 

Unknown

_16C6437.thumb.JPG.b47a488591663403cc77fac03dc94499.JPG

 

Graptolites

5a0d0c330a84e_diplograptussp..thumb.JPG.4ad5d13a7d4c015c31fe3b0dc033fb3c.JPG

 

Lots of fragments

_16C6432.thumb.JPG.5687381abba70e0f3724cc3b783d5aef.JPG

 

Bivalve

_16C6428.thumb.JPG.a936aa79ed8e01933ece95dc39ff2722.JPG

Edited by Greg.Wood

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Foozil

Nice finds! 

@piranha might be able to help with the first one :) 

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Kane

Pic 1: trilobite pygidum. Scott (@piranha)? I'm close to ID'ing this but would feel more comfortable with your say-so. I'm thinking Ordovician here. A Flexi, maybe?

Pic 2: graptoilites (Ordovician rock?)

Pic 3: nautiloid, Ordovician age likely

Pic 4: Brachiopod, likely Ordovician. 

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WhodamanHD

Nice finds!

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Greg.Wood
8 hours ago, Kane said:

Pic 1: trilobite pygidum. Scott (@piranha)? I'm close to ID'ing this but would feel more comfortable with your say-so. I'm thinking Ordovician here. A Flexi, maybe?

Pic 2: graptoilites (Ordovician rock?)

Pic 3: nautiloid, Ordovician age likely

Pic 4: Brachiopod, likely Ordovician. 

@KaneYou are right, everything should be Ordovician here. There's an interesting black shale that washes up on the shore on the beach which smells like oil when split. I've found some pyritized trilobite fragments so hopefully one day I'll find a nice one.

 

Also, just wondering what makes you say brach over bivalve for #4?

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Fossildude19
3 hours ago, Greg.Wood said:

Also, just wondering what makes you say brach over bivalve for #4?

Greg, 

The latitudinal ribbing point more to brachiopod than bivalve, to me. 

Bivalves tend to have stronger longitudinal ribbing. ;) 

Regards,

 

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Greg.Wood
1 hour ago, Fossildude19 said:

Greg, 

The latitudinal ribbing point more to brachiopod than bivalve, to me. 

Bivalves tend to have stronger longitudinal ribbing. ;) 

Regards,

 

I read brachiopod top and bottom shells are usually assymetrical where bivalve shell halves are usually more symmetrical. Good to know about the ridge direction differences for cases like this!

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Monica

Hi there!

 

Could the "lots of fragments" picture be a conulariid rather than an orthoconic nautiloid?

 

Excellent finds, by the way - I am :envy:!!!

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

Monica

 

 

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Greg.Wood

@Monica conulariid does appear to fit. The crease down the middle makes it look like a flattened out pyramid shape.

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Arion

Some nice stuff here Greg.  A few thoughts on identification based on fossils I've found in the Collingwood area (the Ordovician Whitby Formation runs kind of north-south from Georgian Bay to Lake Ontario).

 

Tentatively, I'd suggest the trilobite pygidium is Flexicalymene senaria, but I'm sure @piranha can give you a more confident ID.

 

The graptolites are probably a species of either Climacograptus or Diplograptus.  I'm not sure precisely how to differentiate them at the species level, so I'll leave it at that.

 

The conularid looks different from the conularids I've seen from the Whitby Formation, much more elongate.  The other fragments are mostly from the trilobite Triarthrus, with a nice (albeit incomplete) example of a cephalon on the bottom right corner of the image.  From my experience near Collingwood, Triarthrus seems to be found mostly in one particular layer, where they occur in great quantities (usually disarticulated) and sometimes in conjunction with the brachiopod Lingula.  Above the Triarthrus on the right is what looks like a Pseudogygites librigena in, I'm guessing, ventral view; you can see the semicircular outline where it bordered the eye.

 

The brachiopod looks like Rafinesquina deltoidea; similar to Leptaena, but with a more convex anterior pedicle valve.

 

EDIT: Just thought of this, Harish Verma's 'Geology and Fossils of the Craigleith area' (http://www.geologyontario.mndmf.gov.on.ca/mndmfiles/pub/data/imaging/GB07/GB07.pdf) is a good starting point for ID'ing the more common stuff from the Whitby Formation (though it's good to confirm the taxonomy, as a couple species have been reassigned since it was published in 1979).

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subsonicdrone

i was out in pickering last weekend and found some of the same shale

might have to get some gear to prep the pieces and bring them home without splitting

so easy to damage once split and also the slitting process breaks nice pieces in half sometimes.

IMG_7130.JPG

IMG_7133.JPG

IMG_7144.JPG

IMG_7154.JPG

IMG_7160.JPG

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Kane

A nice pyritized and plump orthocone nautiloid there! Not to mention some neat fragments of the trilobites Pseudogygites latimarginatus and Triarthrus sp. It pays to be a picker out in Pickering. :D 

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subsonicdrone

:)

a google search for Triarthrus  turned up a beautifully prepped one on the forum here

 

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Kane
Just now, subsonicdrone said:

:)

a google search for Triarthrus  turned up a beautifully prepped one on the forum here

 

Here's one from my album, came out as-is: 

 

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